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I need to Reinstall Windows 7 on SSD. What's the procedure? - Page 2

post #11 of 16
Thread Starter 
Can someone tell me the best way to set up the user account for windows? I don't think I did it right last time. I've always just had it as "User", and I don't remember what kind of admin powers I gave it. Its been a while... I don't remember what I'm supposed to do lol. I'm even more confused by the fact that I've heard strong cases for both sides why the primary user account should and shouldn't have windows admin abilities. I think I remember hearing that if it does then you risk serious security threats that take advantage of it and if you don't then you constantly have to enable admin in order to do anything. *confused* I'm so tired, I'm not even sure if I'm making any sense. frown.gif Can someone help me with this?
Quote:
Originally Posted by Techie007 View Post

    To wipe a drive from your Windows installation disc:
  1. Boot your Windows installation disc, and choose to install Windows.
  2. At the drive selection screen, press [Shift]+[F10] to open a Command Prompt window.
  3. Type "diskpart" and press [Enter].
  4. Type "list disk" and press [Enter].
  5. In the list of disks that appear, identify the one that you wish to wipe.  Your main boot device should be Disk 0.  If it is not, you may not have your storage devices connected correctly, which could cause the bootloader to be installed on another disk when you actually install Windows.
  6. Type "select disk X", replacing "X" with the number of the drive you wish to erase.
  7. You have two wipe options:
    • Type "clean" and press [Enter]: A fast wipe that simply erases all the partition information from the drive.  It should take less than a few seconds to complete, and is adequate in most cases.  Think of it as one step more than a quick format.
    • Type "clean all" and press [Enter]: A full wipe that completely erases the drive, writing zeros end to end.  This could take several hours, and may be worth it if you're concerned about low-level viruses, or the health of the HDD.

That last step is where I am now. I used "clean all", but now its just sitting there. Is that normal? Will it working and will let me know when its done? Cause right now its just says:
Code:
DISKPART> clean all
_

with the "_" blinking. Do I just wait now? There's no indication anywhere that anything is happening. eh-smiley.gif
post #12 of 16
Thread Starter 
Ummmmmm... wait. It just finished. Wait, in 10 minutes? bigeyedsmiley.png That can't be right. I mean yeah, the drive was an 840 Pro SSD and was only 128GB.... but that was awfully quick for something that can take up to several hours. Is something wrong? If not, will doing it a few more times increase the effectiveness of wiping it to zero? Can I even do that, or will I risk damaging the drive? If so, how many times can I wipe an SSD with the "clean all" command without risking damage?
post #13 of 16
    That surprised me too, until I ran the math: 128,000,000,000 bytes / 300,000,000 bytes/second = 427 seconds / 60 = 7.1 minutes.  So your 10 minutes was just about right, if a bit slow.  Are you sure that the SSD is plugged into a SATAIII controller and not a SATAII controller?  The "several hours" disclaimer was for 500+GB HDDs.  I do wish diskpart gave more feedback while zeroing, though.
 
Edited by Techie007 - 1/9/15 at 3:35pm
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post #14 of 16
Thread Starter 
Well I just know it was somewhere within 10 minutes. It wasn't doing anything so I checked back in 10 and it was done. jealoussmiley.gif I'm very happy with how fast these drives are so I'm not worried.

So what about my other questions about multiple drive wipes?

Also, I'm very relieved you're still on this site and available to help me with that. *whew* I was worried you wouldn't be around after all this time. People come and go on these forums all the time. Its not uncommon for users to go missing as their interests or real life responsibilities change.
Edited by Drahadis - 1/9/15 at 1:38pm
post #15 of 16
    Regarding multiple drive wipes, each time you use the diskpart clean all command, you will go through as many writes as your drive capacity is large.  So, with this 128 GB drive, each time you wipe, it will go through another 128 GB of writes.  While this isn't a big deal since these better SSDs can handle petabytes of writes, it will gain you nothing from a security standpoint, and run though writes unnecessarily in the process.
  Bottom line: Zeroing once is enough is practically all cases.  The only exception would be if the drive had very sensitive data on it, in which case it would be better to use another tool that would write random data to the drive first, and finish by writing zeros with this command.
 
 
Quote:
Originally Posted by Drahadis View Post

Can someone tell me the best way to set up the user account for windows? I don't think I did it right last time. I've always just had it as "User", and I don't remember what kind of admin powers I gave it. Its been a while... I don't remember what I'm supposed to do lol. I'm even more confused by the fact that I've heard strong cases for both sides why the primary user account should and shouldn't have windows admin abilities. I think I remember hearing that if it does then you risk serious security threats that take advantage of it and if you don't then you constantly have to enable admin in order to do anything. *confused* I'm so tired, I'm not even sure if I'm making any sense. frown.gif Can someone help me with this?

    Yes, it is safer to have the primary user account not have administrative privileges.  However, starting with Windows Vista, Windows now has UAC which provides the same level of protection as a limited account on administrative accounts.  With UAC enabled, an administrative account behaves just like a limited account, with the option that applications can request permission from the user to elevate to administrative privileges.  Since this provides the same level of security while being much more convenient for the user, I recommend using an administrative account with UAC enabled.  After installation, when Windows prompts you for user names, just enter yours (or a pseudonym), and you're done.  By default, the primary account is created with administrative privileges, and UAC is enabled.
    The only exceptions to my recommendation above would be computers still running XP (which doesn't have UAC), and users who are not savvy (or responsible) and would just click the [Yes] button to the UAC elevation dialog, letting malware into the computer.
 
Edited by Techie007 - 1/9/15 at 4:03pm
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Kingston SV300S3 WesternDigital WD10EZEX Samsung HD154UI Windows 7 Ultimate SP1 x64 
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post #16 of 16
Thread Starter 
Sorry! I'm really really tired and making a lot of mistakes in my posts. I meant to say drive wipes, not questions in my last post in here. I fixed it above. tiredsmiley.gif Ugh... I feel like total crap.

Thanks for the info though. smile.gif
Edited by Drahadis - 1/11/15 at 4:29pm
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