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[Sky News] Two Workers Killed At LG's TV Screen Factory

post #1 of 38
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At least two workers have died at LG's display factory in South Korea following a nitrogen leak.

One of the workers died at the scene and the other died on the way to hospital.

At least five more staff and contractors have been injured and one is in a critical condition.

frown.gif You wouldn't think these guys are dying making TV screens. I suppose it shows how dangerous these factories can be, even with gases like nitrogen, which I wouldn't have thought of being a dangerous gas. Just shows any gas in a confined space can be fatal. frown.gif
post #2 of 38
Quote:
Originally Posted by latelesley View Post

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frown.gif You wouldn't think these guys are dying making TV screens. I suppose it shows how dangerous these factories can be, even with gases like nitrogen, which I wouldn't have thought of being a dangerous gas. Just shows any gas in a confined space can be fatal. frown.gif

Liquid Nitrogen evaporation can damage you (and possibly kill you as well). Every gas "heavier" than oxygen will damage you and possibly kill you.
I don't remember exactly the % when you can start to feel something, and the % that will possibly kill you so if anyone have these numbers I would gladly appreciate it.

Nothing wrong with LG Factory, a leak can happen, even in the most controlled environment. Still sad for those 2 mans. Hopefully LG will send a few peeps checking all the pipes and connection.
post #3 of 38
this is why we have OSHA
post #4 of 38
Quote:
Originally Posted by tSgt View Post

Liquid Nitrogen evaporation can damage you (and possibly kill you as well). Every gas "heavier" than oxygen will damage you and possibly kill you.
I don't remember exactly the % when you can start to feel something, and the % that will possibly kill you so if anyone have these numbers I would gladly appreciate it.

Nothing wrong with LG Factory, a leak can happen, even in the most controlled environment. Still sad for those 2 mans. Hopefully LG will send a few peeps checking all the pipes and connection.
Nitrogen replaces oxygen in air so it doesn't even have to be low temperatures to do damage. Actually when working in a glovebox under nitrogen/argon atmosphere a leak would not perse be a huge deal but you rather not have them.

If you get slow it is time to leave and cycle the room then check for leaks.
post #5 of 38
if it ecounter hot surface in a closed or semi closed place it can expend so fast that it create overpressure and then the enclosure can blow too , it what happen to the lhc with helium , moved blast proof door and thing like that . You can also have oxygen pumping with liquid helium which can be fire hazard. but with nitrogen the main thing is oxygen displacement, aldo for this to happen in a industrial environement is suprising usually there is more then enough ventilation or the gas reserve are stored outside.
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post #6 of 38

They are talking about LN2. Our LN2. Yikes.

 

I didn't see Nitrogen "Gas only" mentioned in the article. Only speculation that a valve might have been opened by one of the workers by mistake.

 

In our terms we are talking "potentially" the same LN2 Overclockers use. I cannot even imagine the scene where LN2 came in contact with 7 people and two dying. That means it was all over. For you that Cryo your benches..., for 2 people to be killed and 5 others hospitalized, one still in critical condition. What the hell could have happened?

 

It's a factory so who knows if it was a large canister of LN2 that leaked or got into the air or a pressurized valve. Either case it sucks. 

 

Quote: BBC News
 

For laboratory personnel in particular, there is also the risk of asphyxiation if liquid nitrogen - which is colourless, odourless and tasteless - is used or spilled in a confined space. Lab worker James Graham died from asphyxiation in 1999.

Liquid nitrogen also has a large expansion ratio on evaporation - one litre of liquid nitrogen can result in about 700 litres of gas - so only a relatively small volume of liquid nitrogen has to evaporate within a room to result in an oxygen deficient atmosphere. Pressure can build up in a sealed container due to the boil-off of nitrogen gas, so insulated vacuum-jacketed pressure containters are used to store it.


Edited by Ghoxt - 1/12/15 at 5:19am
post #7 of 38
Quote:
Originally Posted by Ghoxt View Post

They are talking about LN2. Our LN2. Yikes.

I didn't see Nitrogen "Gas only" mentioned in the article. Only speculation that a valve might have been opened by one of the workers by mistake.

In our terms we are talking "potentially" the same LN2 Overclockers use. I cannot even imagine the scene where LN2 came in contact with 7 people and two dying. That means it was all over. For you that Cryo your benches..., for 2 people to be killed and 5 others hospitalized, one still in critical condition. What the hell could have happened?

It's a factory so who knows if it was a large canister of LN2 that leaked or got into the air or a pressurized valve. Either case it sucks. 

If you leak liquid nitrogen, it very rapidly turns into gas. That gas then displaces the oxygen in the room starting with the floor and works its way up. By the time you realize something's wrong, you're a few seconds away from passing out, and unless someone manages to cycle the entire room in time you're pretty much done.

The quantity of LN2 matters, though. You open a valve in a fabrication plant, you could have a very large release. The amount of it most overclockers use is simply not enough to cause a problem.

I suspect that it wasn't liquid nitrogen, though. They don't have a reason to use cryogenics during TV fabrication. They do, however, have very good reasons to use pressurized dry nitrogen gas in an environment sensitive to ESD. It's used in cleaning procedures as a pressurized gas source that doesn't have water in it or other contaminants. Open one of the even relatively small 6' tall tanks you'd strap to a wall, and you can easily get enough of a release to cause the situation described in the article.

Pressurized gas tanks are not to be trifled with. There are a lot of ways they can kill you if handled improperly.
post #8 of 38
Quote:
Originally Posted by Mand12 View Post

If you leak liquid nitrogen, it very rapidly turns into gas. That gas then displaces the oxygen in the room starting with the floor and works its way up. By the time you realize something's wrong, you're a few seconds away from passing out, and unless someone manages to cycle the entire room in time you're pretty much done.

The quantity of LN2 matters, though. You open a valve in a fabrication plant, you could have a very large release. The amount of it most overclockers use is simply not enough to cause a problem.

I suspect that it wasn't liquid nitrogen, though. They don't have a reason to use cryogenics during TV fabrication. They do, however, have very good reasons to use pressurized dry nitrogen gas in an environment sensitive to ESD. It's used in cleaning procedures as a pressurized gas source that doesn't have water in it or other contaminants. Open one of the even relatively small 6' tall tanks you'd strap to a wall, and you can easily get enough of a release to cause the situation described in the article.

Pressurized gas tanks are not to be trifled with. There are a lot of ways they can kill you if handled improperly.
I can't even imagine I mean the risk with gloveboxes is small as there is only so much that you will realize something is going terribly wrong and leave the room asap. In a well ventilated room a argon/nitrogen leak may even go undetected until you realize the glovebox has higher ppm water and oxygen than should be.
post #9 of 38
Quote:
Originally Posted by Mand12 View Post

Pressurized gas tanks are not to be trifled with. There are a lot of ways they can kill you if handled improperly.
Yup.... see videos of scuba tanks with a valve experiencing catastrophic failure.

There's a LOT of force and volume of gas in tanks.
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post #10 of 38
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Originally Posted by maarten12100 View Post

I can't even imagine I mean the risk with gloveboxes is small as there is only so much that you will realize something is going terribly wrong and leave the room asap. In a well ventilated room a argon/nitrogen leak may even go undetected until you realize the glovebox has higher ppm water and oxygen than should be.

More dangerous situation for gloveboxes is loss of N2 atmosphere and haveing the content react with air or in some cases water:)
imagine Na stored in glove box that suddenly gets flooded... seen that happen - lab didnt look that nice nomore:)

And you would have to use a fully open N2 gas tank to observe any situation similar to that in the factory - air moves and small leaks of N2 will be compensated by it. No biggie.
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