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[Build Log] - IRONBEAST - A fully water cooled, X99, Quad GPU, 900D build - Page 105

post #1041 of 1313
Wow I just found this thread after all this time. This is going to be amazing. Kudos to you for keeping up with the project after a year.
post #1042 of 1313
Thread Starter 
Quote:
Originally Posted by Barefooter View Post

The Phobya splitters only report the RPM signal from one fan, that's why it works.

The Mod my toys splitter reports RPMs from all fans, that's most likely why you are seeing the RPMs fluctuate. You can cut the RPM circuit on the back side of the splitter, all except one, and they should still work.

Here's a picture someone else posted of the back side.


I came to the same conclusion, though I hadn’t considered physically modifying the hubs’ PCBs - that’s a really good thought. That single rank 5-way three-pin hub (which is what I currently use for the front and offside fans) looks like it would be easy enough. The twin rank 8-way four-pin PWM hubs are a bit more complex in their layout, though not massively so - a similar single cut in the pin-3 path between headers one and two should do the same job.

Quote:
Originally Posted by RavageTheEarth View Post

Wow I just found this thread after all this time. This is going to be amazing. Kudos to you for keeping up with the project after a year.

Thanks, you’re too kind. It may have completely taken over my life, but I will see this finished.
post #1043 of 1313
I was under the impression that the original idea was to have copper (looking) tubing. Or am I mistaken? In any case.... whoa. Can't wait to see the finished product.
post #1044 of 1313
Thread Starter 
A quick update on the current state of play.

The reservoir sleeves, now in the aluminium, have been trimmed to size and the window cut outs have been successfully made in both. The raw edges just require to be smoothed off and deburred, the surface cleaned up, and then they will be ready for polishing. I have also acquired the black foam padding (of a thinner size than is used everywhere else in the build) which will go inside them, and that is ready for cutting to the profile as soon as the sleeves themselves are finished.

The last set of soft-tube compression fittings arrived a couple of days ago (alongside an eclectic mix of other bits and pieces) and as a result most of the subfloor pipework is now completed. Unfortunately I don’t have quite enough of the PVC to finish everything that needs it (the expansion lower port connections, plus the links through to the Aqauero waterblock) - and naturally I forgot to include some more of that in the last set of orders because I’m a total idiot who's not paying enough attention to what he’s doing.

Now about a week or so ago, in regards to the subject of its weight, I mentioned my assumption that the completed Ironbeast would probably need to be modified with a decent set of wheels. Now the easiest thing to do would be to simply screw a set of casters onto the bottom - but I really don’t want to do that because, in my humble opinion, it looks pig ugly. Instead I propose to make use of the cavity produced by the bottom of the frame to accommodate a set of concealed rollers (an idea that I first considered for a kind of independent base-stand back when I was still hoping to modify the 900D).

Something like this:


These would be made from a series of metal rods slotted in between the two bottom sidebars, and on which would be carried some appropriate washers and about twenty thin, free-running cylinders (probably wooden, though possibly rubber) grouped into two parallel ranks. Fatefully assuming I get this right it should only lift the total height of the build by a few mm, providing a much more stable base and distribution of loading than casters would. Differential rotation between the individual rollers should allow the rig some capacity to turn, and once the case panels go on the whole arrangement should be all-but invisible - save for a tiny gap between the base of the case and the floor.

As always, your opinions on the idea would be most welcome.

Quote:
Originally Posted by Exeed Orbit View Post

I was under the impression that the original idea was to have copper (looking) tubing. Or am I mistaken? In any case.... whoa. Can't wait to see the finished product.

I think you must be thinking of a different build there, as copper tubing is about the one material I didn’t consider using for this! (Although there was lots of sheet copper work proposed for my custom motherboard heatsink and bespoke GPU waterblock concept. I’m still a bit sad that none of that work will ever be realised.) If you look at the CAD renders they are all done with pipework sections in clear tubing. The idea was, and is, that I can see the water in the tubes - how clean it is, anywhere that is isn’t flowing where it should be, air pockets, residue, sedimentation, etc. However I did also consider stainless steel, chromed brass, and gloss black in keeping with the overall colour scheme.
post #1045 of 1313
Quote:
Originally Posted by OCDesign View Post

Now about a week or so ago, in regards to the subject of its weight, I mentioned my assumption that the completed Ironbeast would probably need to be modified with a decent set of wheels. Now the easiest thing to do would be to simply screw a set of casters onto the bottom - but I really don’t want to do that because, in my humble opinion, it looks pig ugly. Instead I propose to make use of the cavity produced by the bottom of the frame to accommodate a set of concealed rollers (an idea that I first considered for a kind of independent base-stand back when I was still hoping to modify the 900D).

Something like this:


These would be made from a series of metal rods slotted in between the two bottom sidebars, and on which would be carried some appropriate washers and about twenty thin, free-running cylinders (probably wooden, though possibly rubber) grouped into two parallel ranks. Fatefully assuming I get this right it should only lift the total height of the build by a few mm, providing a much more stable base and distribution of loading than casters would. Differential rotation between the individual rollers should allow the rig some capacity to turn, and once the case panels go on the whole arrangement should be all-but invisible - save for a tiny gap between the base of the case and the floor.

As always, your opinions on the idea would be most welcome.
Looks like an excellent idea. Was going to suggest two independent rows for easier turning, but after reading again I saw that you had already planned this (as always).

My only suggestion would be that you either implement some sort of locking mechanism for the rollers, or that you mount the side bars on some sort of taper so that you can raise and lower the rollers as needed.

Third suggestion would go very old school and just make a thin slices of wood that prevent the rollers for moving (same concept as a door stopper, but way more elegant). These would act as covers as well, hiding any gap from the floor/table.

I would definitely have some way of preventing it from moving when you have it where you want it.

On mobile now, but can draw up some sketches tomorrow.

Excellent as ever. Do you have an overhead crane to lift it up and down from your desk? biggrin.gif
post #1046 of 1313


Your idea reminds me of one of these, although it could do with a lot more chrome to match your rig.
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post #1047 of 1313
Quote:
Originally Posted by OCDesign View Post

However I did also consider stainless steel, chromed brass, and gloss black in keeping with the overall colour scheme.

Ah yes, Chromed Brass... that's it. I knew it was some metallic tubing, though my oversight led to my thinking it was copper (probably, like you mentioned, due to the fact that you had the copper waterblock design)
post #1048 of 1313
Thread Starter 
Reservoir sleeves:


Aluminium tubes trimmed to size, window sections removed, cut edges smoothed off and deburred. Surface cleaned and finished with a copper brush, 120 grit sandpaper, 240 grit sandpaper and wire wool. Not too bad I think, really quite pleased. I now have to get the foam pad cut (that one in the shot is actually the thicker 10mm type) and sort out matching rings to fill in the tops around the reservoir cap.

However, as recommended, I got some of the Meguiar’s metal polish. Here it is tested it out on one of the offcuts:


The test piece was divided in two. The right hand end shows the polish applied to the raw unfinished surface of the aluminium, as you have seen it in previous posts. The left hand end is what you get when it is applied to the finished surface as described above, and as you see on the sleeve next to it.

All I can say is this - damn you and your good ideas! It looks fantastic; very, very, close to silver of the Bitspower fittings and with almost no effort at all. But, as predicted, it makes the spray paint on all the plastic bits look distinctly second rate by comparison - at least to my eyes. This is most noticeable on the pump tops, mainly because the two surfaces are right next to each other. Interestingly it has also been tested on the stainless steel tube, out of curiosity, and that polishes up nowhere near as well; or at least would demand significantly more work in order to get it to do so. The aluminium was definitely the right call, but I now have to decide which finish to match it to; either the fittings (most visibly my GPU manifolds, remember those?) or to the painted pump tops, both of which are very prominent features of the build. The brushed finish is done, and it blends in better - but the polished finish is just so much nicer, and it is the way they were originally meant to look…

Quote:
Originally Posted by Exeed Orbit View Post

Ah yes, Chromed Brass... that's it. I knew it was some metallic tubing, though my oversight led to my thinking it was copper (probably, like you mentioned, due to the fact that you had the copper waterblock design)

I was still debating whether to use that (the Alphacool HardTube stuff), at least in part, right up until very recently. Metal-tube builds always look totally outstanding to me. Ah well, next time maybe...

Quote:
Originally Posted by donkidonki View Post



Your idea reminds me of one of these, although it could do with a lot more chrome to match your rig.

I know some people get some seriously sizable cases for the beastlier rigs, but I’m not sure anyone here has a PC that needs one of those to move it around. Or do they? Is there some kind of OCN elite, a multi-billion pound Supercomputer Builders Club that I don’t know about?

Quote:
Originally Posted by bkvamme View Post

Looks like an excellent idea. Was going to suggest two independent rows for easier turning, but after reading again I saw that you had already planned this (as always).

My only suggestion would be that you either implement some sort of locking mechanism for the rollers, or that you mount the side bars on some sort of taper so that you can raise and lower the rollers as needed.

Third suggestion would go very old school and just make a thin slices of wood that prevent the rollers for moving (same concept as a door stopper, but way more elegant). These would act as covers as well, hiding any gap from the floor/table.

I would definitely have some way of preventing it from moving when you have it where you want it.

On mobile now, but can draw up some sketches tomorrow.

Excellent as ever. Do you have an overhead crane to lift it up and down from your desk? biggrin.gif

A locking system for the rollers is a very good idea. It would certainly be helpful if the case could stay still, especially whilst I’m installing stuff! Some form of wedge-shaped door-stopper style solution is probably the easiest way of implementing that, especially if the rollers are free-running on the axles. Maybe conceal one on some form of sliding mount, perhaps sprung, that can be pushed into contact with the back rollers to stop them when required. Not too difficult a thing to create, but perhaps trickier to implement as a modification now that the frame is made. Another option would be to fix the rollers to the axles and have them rotate. One or two of them could then have a screw in the end, which when tightened pulls the end of the axle into hard contact with the frame and stops it moving. Problem with that would be how to conceal those screw heads whilst still keeping them accessible, and of course it would loose the differential rotation between the two ranks unless I create a split-axle. Something for me to think on.

Oh and as for the overhead crane, who ever said Ironbeast was going on my desk.

I have other plans...
post #1049 of 1313
Quote:
Originally Posted by OCDesign View Post


I have other plans...

That sounds evil... I like it. devil-smiley-019.gif
Edited by Exeed Orbit - 6/19/16 at 7:45pm
post #1050 of 1313
"I know some people get some seriously sizable cases for the beastlier rigs, but I’m not sure anyone here has a PC that needs one of those to move it around. Or do they? Is there some kind of OCN elite, a multi-billion pound Supercomputer Builders Club that I don’t know about? "

I'm not sure there's many rig's that need those things full size (though you never know on this forum), it did get me thinking about a scaled down version with nice rc alloy wheels. It would kinda match the engine theme, heck you could even stick some motors in and make it a really fast pc....
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