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[Build Log] - IRONBEAST - A fully water cooled, X99, Quad GPU, 900D build - Page 90

post #891 of 1313
mate I'll always be checking back for the updates. This one has me intrigued thumb.gif
post #892 of 1313
Thread Starter 
Small update:

The stainless steel tubing for the reservoir sleeves is here.


Two 500mm sections waiting to be trimmed down to size and have their windows cut, before being polished up to a respectable appearance. I’ve decided to go with a brushed finish rather than the completely polished look. It’s easier to achieve, matches the grills I have for the 140 fans, and better compliments the matt silver of the light bars on the RAM memory. Most of all however it works with the silver/chrome paint that I’ve been trying out for the fans, pump tops, etc. Against a genuine polished metal surface (like the fittings) it’s very conspicuous that it’s paint, and from what I’ve read a true mirror finish (as they appear in the renders) is going to be extremely difficult on a shape as complex as a fan. However next to brushed metal the effect is really very close, and with decent surface perpetration, primer and a gloss-black undercoat I hope it will do the job passably well - if not quite as shiny and flawless as I would have liked.


The black pad shown in the picture is for sound deadening the pumps, but by luck I have found another valuable use for it. The stainless steel tube is 70mm OD with a 1.5mm wall, so it’s about 3.5mm clearance around the reservoir. (The next size down, 2.5”, would have given a 0.25mm all-around clearance – i.e. interference fit – which I decided was a little too close for comfort. It would have been perfect, provided the reservoir is exactly 60mm OD - which, being plastic, is almost certainly isn’t.) The 200mm wide pad fits just perfectly, which will help cushion and protect the reservoir nice and snugly plus eliminate the risk of scratches from the metal. Unfortunatly the pad I have for the pumps, as shown in the photo, is 10mm - which is too thick. However I’ve already ordered some of the thinner 5mm pad, which should work superbly.

The damping foam will also do a very good job of making the inside of the sleeves black. The reservoir lighting experiments (if anyone can remember that far back) showed a great effect with a black background when the tube had bubbles in it, whilst silver was better when it didn’t. Testing of the top mounted split-return idea showed it does indeed work as intended; the two jets that are produced create a lovely swirl of bubbles in the reservoir (and a very nice sound). So, a black interior it shall be - and without having to paint anything.


In other news all the pieces of the test frame have now been waterproofed. However for some reason the laminate stuff has taken on a slightly brown tinge in a few places (seemingly in no predictable pattern) so I’m looking into that before I reassemble the frame. Still waiting on the metal strips for the brackets (which are taking an unusually long time to get here), the kit for cutting and bending the acrylic tube, plus a few other bits and pieces.
Edited by OCDesign - 2/15/16 at 1:38pm
post #893 of 1313
drool.gif
post #894 of 1313
Thread Starter 
Another little update:

In my last post I showed you the 500mm stainless steel tubes I have got for making the reservoir sleeves, and a little while back I mentioned that I was hoping to use some of the excess to make some neater, sleeker, matching brackets to replace the ugly plastic stock ones. Well here are a few pictures of what I’ve got in mind.


This is an exploded view of the bracket design (yes, I know, yet more CAD work - somebody stop me). As you can hopefully see the idea is to cut a thin 10mm ring of stainless steel from the spare bits of tube, make a cut through it, then fold out the two adjacent quarters of the circumference to produce a U-shape. Two slots would then be made in the flattened sections and the whole thing polished up to match the sleeve itself. Then a small 10mm thick piece of black acrylic (of which I have plenty spare, from back when I was foolishly attempting to fabricate the Neopixel backlighting spacers by hand) will be used to create the second half of the bracket. A semicircle cutout will be made and six screw holes drilled; four to fix the bracket together and two more to mount it.


The result should look something like this. This design should help hold the reservoir firmly in place, whilst the use of the foam pad that I mentioned previously will cushion it from being damaged. To help with this the screw and slot arrangement will give an easy way to tweak of the tightness of the bracket.


The main reservoir assembly would consist of: the Cape Fuzion Core itself, the stainless steel sleeve, a 5mm foam pad rolled into a cylinder (with half the window profile cut from each open end) wedged in place between them, two of the brackets as described above, and two finishing rings cut from stainless steel plate to neatly cap the exposed ends.

If I can get this to work, the overall result should look something like this:


Full assembly, plus the fittings, gold stop caps (to match the compression fittings, though I may need to change those for vent valves) and the ends of the eight fibre optic strands that will be used for the lighting. A little different from the version in the original CAD models (which had contrast brackets rather than matching the sleeve finish), but all in all it looks a rather promising idea don’t you think?
post #895 of 1313
Quote:
yes, I know, yet more CAD work - somebody stop me)
Cad isn't always a bad thing, I think its a good thing and its professional. It works for you dosen't it?

The fancy resivorir thumb.gif
NOS bottle like looking
post #896 of 1313
Thread Starter 
Quote:
Originally Posted by Iwamotto Tetsuz View Post

Cad isn't always a bad thing, I think its a good thing and its professional. It works for you dosen't it?

The fancy resivorir thumb.gif
NOS bottle like looking

Quite right, and it is true that it does work well for me. But I don’t think there's any doubting that it has become just a little bit of an obsession with this project.
post #897 of 1313
Quote:
Quote:
Originally Posted by Iwamotto Tetsuz View Post

Cad isn't always a bad thing, I think its a good thing and its professional. It works for you dosen't it?

The fancy resivorir thumb.gif
NOS bottle like looking

Quite right, and it is true that it does work well for me. But I don’t think there's any doubting that it has become just a little bit of an obsession with this project.


Proper Prior Planning Prevents Piss Poor Performance.
The Hermit Den
(18 items)
 
  
CPUMotherboardGraphicsRAM
I7-6800k (more info coming soon) EVGA Classified  EVGA FTW 1070 SCX 3.0 (more info coming soon) 16 gb Corsair Dominator (more info coming soon) 
Hard DriveOptical DriveCoolingCooling
OS: M2 Samsung 256 GB Asus Blu-Ray Combo DVD-Burner Corsair H110i Corsair H110i 
OSMonitorMonitorKeyboard
10 Pro Samsung CF791 34" 1800R Monitor 2x Viewsonic VA2719-smh 24" (one vert) Razer Black Widow 2016 Ultimate 
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The Hermit Den
(18 items)
 
  
CPUMotherboardGraphicsRAM
I7-6800k (more info coming soon) EVGA Classified  EVGA FTW 1070 SCX 3.0 (more info coming soon) 16 gb Corsair Dominator (more info coming soon) 
Hard DriveOptical DriveCoolingCooling
OS: M2 Samsung 256 GB Asus Blu-Ray Combo DVD-Burner Corsair H110i Corsair H110i 
OSMonitorMonitorKeyboard
10 Pro Samsung CF791 34" 1800R Monitor 2x Viewsonic VA2719-smh 24" (one vert) Razer Black Widow 2016 Ultimate 
PowerCaseMouseMouse Pad
EVGA Supernova 1000 NZXT Phantom White Razer Naga Chroma none 
AudioAudio
Razer Man-o-War (temp) Razer Man-o-War (temp) 
  hide details  
Reply
post #898 of 1313
Thread Starter 
Small update on this week’s progress:

The specifications for cutting the reservoir sleeves were sent off this afternoon. They can be trimmed to size easily enough, but I’m told the window may well need to be laser cut if I want it done neatly. We’ll hopefully get an ETA on those sometime next week.

The drawings for the remaining test frame parts are also finished and will be submitted for production tomorrow. I’ve made a few modifications to change the way the bottom radiators and fans are fitted. Instead of fixed mounting brackets screwed into the baseplate (as it appears in the renders) I’ve designed a kind of separate tray, rather like the one used for the PSU. If I’ve got this right it will allow the entire subfloor assembly (fans, radiators, pipework, sensors, lighting and cabling) to be disconnected and removed in one piece. Hopefully this should make the process of fitting much easier, as it can all be constructed independently and then simply slotted into place (one of the limitations with the original test frame design, the 900D, and indeed many other cases).

As I mentioned a while back the laminate stuff has been developing a somewhat uneven colour in places. I’ve been working on improving it, but I’m not really satisfied with the results so I’ve changed tack and decided to spray paint them instead. A black satin finish, so they should look exactly the same as before - just neater.

Also the experiments with the silver/chrome paint went really quite well, and after some trial and error we got a rather good finish on the last one. My father’s been helping out a lot with that; so - for the record - thanks dad! (That said he is retired now – and, as he won’t mind me saying, a total Luddite - so I might as well get him doing something useful whilst I sort out all the technical stuff. You know, complicated things - like ‘millimetres’). I was going to show you a comparison between the real metal and the painted plastic (the reservoir sleeve mocked up using a spare piece of drainpipe); but we then foolishly tried putting some protective lacquer on and somewhat ruined it (turned it all a dull pewter-looking matt grey). The silver paint was inclined to rub off slightly on your fingertips, but I think that’s just because the surface of the plastic wasn’t primed properly. I’m going to do another test, much more thoroughly this time, comparing the difference with and without a gloss black undercoat (though I am going have to order a new filter mask first). If all goes well, then fingers crossed I should have a sample silver fan for you to look at soon.

Quote:
Originally Posted by Angry-Hermit View Post

Proper Prior Planning Prevents Piss Poor Performance.

Ah, the alliterative mantra…you sound like one of my old university engineering lecturers! I certainly can’t dispute the truth of that one though!
post #899 of 1313
Even the test frame looks bananas. It's insane how much work, thought, effort, and patience you've put into this project. I commend you for that. I will live vicariously through you, as I would never even dream of taking on a project of this magnitude. The level of engineering that went into this is just awesome. I raise my glass, and I tip my hat to you. Bravo.
post #900 of 1313
Thread Starter 
Well there it is: March 2nd, 01:17 GMT - this build log is officially one year old.

My thanks to all of you who have been reading, commenting and advising for sticking with me and my mammoth, obsessive, preposterously over-designed and excessively CAD rendered vanity project! I’ve no doubt that I’d have given up on it long before now if it weren’t for you all. It really is much appreciated.

We will see this finished yet…


Edit: And this gets to be post #900. Don’t know why that’s so pleasing, but it somehow just is.
Edited by OCDesign - 3/1/16 at 5:26pm
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