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Quick Disconnects - Page 2

post #11 of 23
Thread Starter 
Quote:
Originally Posted by tsm106 View Post

Dual rotary
http://www.performance-pcs.com/bitspower-g-1-4-matte-black-dual-rotary-90-degree-ig-1-4-adapter.html
Single
http://www.performance-pcs.com/fittings-connectors/bitspower-g-1-4-matte-black-rotary-90-degree-ig-1-4-adapter.html
The dual rotary is a large radius bend vs no radius on the single rotary. Generally you want to avoid fittings on the pump outlet and if you do have to use one, avoid using one with an extreme bend. Also you should NEVER use a sponge on a DDC, especially one as powerful as a 35x, let alone a dual one. DDC pumps exhaust heat thru the pump case which is obviously an incredibly inefficient method. This led to the DDC pump heatsink market. I prefer the whole pump case heatsink style btw.

As far as a drain, I don't drain typically. I pull the inlet to the pump (qdc or ball valve). Then attach my big oil change funnel/hose to the pump inlet, fill it up with distilled, and pump it till I've replaced the fluid completely, then I repeat it till I've mixed in my new coolant. In my experience drains never work very well. There is always fluid stuck in the loop, so I don't bother.

Well considering i have already purchased all of the fittings (but not the dual rotary) would a koolance ball valve be okay straight off the pump? or would the flow so close to the pump be too much for the valve to keep back? Next time i have some money i will buy some dual rotarys, but what is the downside to using the ones i have on the pump now? As i have been running them for 2 years now and have not seen any problems.
As for the sponge, i had a little leak a while ago, and i had to lift up the pump to wipe up, so the glue on the bottom of the pump does not work as well now and it vibrates without the foam. I will remove that when i sort it all out next week.
post #12 of 23
Quote:
Originally Posted by Xotic View Post

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Quote:
Originally Posted by tsm106 View Post

Dual rotary
http://www.performance-pcs.com/bitspower-g-1-4-matte-black-dual-rotary-90-degree-ig-1-4-adapter.html
Single
http://www.performance-pcs.com/fittings-connectors/bitspower-g-1-4-matte-black-rotary-90-degree-ig-1-4-adapter.html
The dual rotary is a large radius bend vs no radius on the single rotary. Generally you want to avoid fittings on the pump outlet and if you do have to use one, avoid using one with an extreme bend. Also you should NEVER use a sponge on a DDC, especially one as powerful as a 35x, let alone a dual one. DDC pumps exhaust heat thru the pump case which is obviously an incredibly inefficient method. This led to the DDC pump heatsink market. I prefer the whole pump case heatsink style btw.

As far as a drain, I don't drain typically. I pull the inlet to the pump (qdc or ball valve). Then attach my big oil change funnel/hose to the pump inlet, fill it up with distilled, and pump it till I've replaced the fluid completely, then I repeat it till I've mixed in my new coolant. In my experience drains never work very well. There is always fluid stuck in the loop, so I don't bother.

Well considering i have already purchased all of the fittings (but not the dual rotary) would a koolance ball valve be okay straight off the pump? or would the flow so close to the pump be too much for the valve to keep back? Next time i have some money i will buy some dual rotarys, but what is the downside to using the ones i have on the pump now? As i have been running them for 2 years now and have not seen any problems.
As for the sponge, i had a little leak a while ago, and i had to lift up the pump to wipe up, so the glue on the bottom of the pump does not work as well now and it vibrates without the foam. I will remove that when i sort it all out next week.


You don't want any restriction straight off the pump. Other than that there are ideal ways to do things and there are compromises, shrugs. Yea, you can run a ball valve off the pump but why? I'm not sure why you want to open the loop at the pump. The pump runs so fast you will run out of liquid there so fast it will run dry that much faster.
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post #13 of 23
Thread Starter 
Quote:
Originally Posted by tsm106 View Post

You don't want any restriction straight off the pump. Other than that there are ideal ways to do things and there are compromises, shrugs. Yea, you can run a ball valve off the pump but why? I'm not sure why you want to open the loop at the pump. The pump runs so fast you will run out of liquid there so fast it will run dry that much faster.

I wanna be able to drain the loop dry, so i need to open it from the bottom right? the case is far too big and heavy to lift and tip, and when i fill the loop, shouldnt i be doing that with the pump off anyway? so having the drain on the pump when draining is not my concern, its when i am not draining. Would the pressure from the pump be too much for the ball valve?
post #14 of 23
You will never be able to drain a loop dry!
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post #15 of 23
Thread Starter 
Quote:
Originally Posted by tsm106 View Post

You will never be able to drain a loop dry!

oh.. so how am i going to be able to remove tubes and fittings without getting water on my stuff?
post #16 of 23
Quote:
Originally Posted by Xotic View Post

Quote:
Originally Posted by tsm106 View Post

You will never be able to drain a loop dry!

oh.. so how am i going to be able to remove tubes and fittings without getting water on my stuff?


headscratch.gif

Like everyone else? You drain as much as you can, then grab some paper towels/whatever to catch the drips when you start undoing your loop. Start at the bottom and work your way up.
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post #17 of 23
Thread Starter 
Quote:
Originally Posted by tsm106 View Post

headscratch.gif
Like everyone else? You drain as much as you can, then grab some paper towels/whatever to catch the drips when you start undoing your loop. Start at the bottom and work your way up.
but wouldnt draining as much as i can be easier from the lowest point in the loop? which in this case is that port on my pump? I dont really have any other ports to drain from without tipping my case upside down.
post #18 of 23
Flow is the same anywhere in the loop, so angled fitting introduces the same amount of restriction regardless of its placement. I can't see how putting angled fitting on the pump outlet is any worse than putting it anywhere else in the loop.

Besides, you need to actually try pretty hard to have enough restriction for it to become a problem.

For example, in my loop I have:

- CPU waterblock
- 4 GPU waterblocks in series
- 4 radiators
- 13 angle fittings (6 90 degree and 7 45 degree)
- 2 quick disconnects
- Lots of lengthy tubing

... all fed by a single D5 pump.

Yet the flow is decent and there are no issues with temperature.
post #19 of 23
Quote:
Originally Posted by Xotic View Post

Quote:
Originally Posted by tsm106 View Post

headscratch.gif
Like everyone else? You drain as much as you can, then grab some paper towels/whatever to catch the drips when you start undoing your loop. Start at the bottom and work your way up.
but wouldnt draining as much as i can be easier from the lowest point in the loop? which in this case is that port on my pump? I dont really have any other ports to drain from without tipping my case upside down.


On a basic level yes, but it still doesn't mean all liquid will come out. It's simply reality. There are a bazillion water channels in a rad, crevices in a block, gravity isn't going to draw the liquid out. And if the loop parts are not above any electrics it doesn't matter if it drips anyways as in the case of your rad/pump sandwich in the lower part of your case.

Quote:
Originally Posted by cmpxchg8b View Post

Flow is the same anywhere in the loop, so angled fitting introduces the same amount of restriction regardless of its placement. I can't see how putting angled fitting on the pump outlet is any worse than putting it anywhere else in the loop.

Besides, you need to actually try pretty hard to have enough restriction for it to become a problem.

For example, in my loop I have:

- CPU waterblock
- 4 GPU waterblocks in series
- 4 radiators
- 13 angle fittings (6 90 degree and 7 45 degree)
- 2 quick disconnects
- Lots of lengthy tubing

... all fed by a single D5 pump.

Yet the flow is decent and there are no issues with temperature.


Flow is not the same anywhere in the loop. You're probably confusing flow with water temperature which will equalize throughout the loop. Flow can be very different due to restriction of blocks, fittings, etc.

Wow, 5 blocks, four rads on a single D5? One might conclude that you're in denial about restriction.
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post #20 of 23
Quote:
Originally Posted by tsm106 View Post

On a basic level yes, but it still doesn't mean all liquid will come out. It's simply reality. There are a bazillion water channels in a rad, crevices in a block, gravity isn't going to draw the liquid out. And if the loop parts are not above any electrics it doesn't matter if it drips anyways as in the case of your rad/pump sandwich in the lower part of your case.
Flow is not the same anywhere in the loop. You're probably confusing flow with water temperature which will equalize throughout the loop. Flow can be very different due to restriction of blocks, fittings, etc.

Wow, 5 blocks, four rads on a single D5? One might conclude that you're in denial about restriction.

Yes and no. Flow rate will be the same everywhere - incompressible fluid. But the flow pattern will be different ie turbulence. It is good practice to have no sharp bends after pumps (and also fans in ducted systems) but in a PC watercooling environment I honestly can't imagine it making much difference.

Actually temperature could well be different in different parts of the loop, this only comes close to equalising because pumps are typically pretty oversized in terms of their flowrate.
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CoolingCoolingCoolingCooling
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