Overclock.net › Forums › Components › Monitors and Displays › Question about Screen calibration tools like the "Spyder"
New Posts  All Forums:Forum Nav:

Question about Screen calibration tools like the "Spyder"

post #1 of 4
Thread Starter 
Hey there!

I always used pro art series monitors for my "serious" work and actually never cared about calibrating my gaming monitors. Since I'll now eighter go for the
Acer Predator XB270HU or the ASUS RoG Swift I would like to get the most out of the monitor.

(I just have to get some answers on my open questions for the Acer one, then I'll definitly go with the IPS panel. Calibrating TN panels sound a bit meh to me biggrin.gif)

Could someone please explain to me how the calibration "exactly" works in terms of installing it.

I did hear that it will keep the room lighting in mind and that said it always changes. For example if it is sunny, cloudy or night with lamps.

I'm also interested in how to "install" them. I can't belive that I just had to put it into a USB port or via DP and then it can change setting for the pixels or w/e.

As you may allready guessed. I never used such a tool and can't really imagine how much it can improve something.
post #2 of 4
The out-of-box calibration for both those monitors should be okay. They may not be worth calibrating.

A Spyder or similar is just a sensor that talks to a computer via USB. It's a device you install drivers for, like anything else. You literally stick it on a monitor and then run the software. The software will cycle the monitor through different colors, with the hardware's sensor picking up the actual colors being displayed. The software can then figure out how off the actual measured value is from what it was supposed to be. Perhaps after some iterations and checking some different colors, it finishes. Out pops maybe a report and probably an ICC profile.

You are not changing the hardware capabilities of the monitor. Applying a fix via software is a kludge, one that might help, but it has its drawbacks, and many games ignore or are finicky with ICC profiles anyway. Higher-end professional monitors have more actual hardware color controls.

Basically the monitor is inaccurate for various colors by various amounts and the "fix" is just to send the wrong colors to the monitor so two wrongs cancel each other out and make a right. e.g. if it turns out that the monitor natively displays orange too reddish, the fix when orange needs to be displayed is to send the monitor color values slightly less red than the orange should be, so the output looks closer to the intended color. And so on for all colors.

A calibrator can help you figure out what you want to set for the monitor's settings in terms of brightness, contrast, gamma, RGB controls, etc. if you want to try to match some standard or get multiple displays looking more similar.

You can certainly calibrate any monitor you want, but you're not getting around hardware limitations. If a cheapo laptop TN panel can't display deep reds, there's no color combination you can send it that will make it do the impossible.

My limited understanding is that the Spyder family is not necessarily the best, and 3rd-party software calibration software is often better than the official stuff anyway, especially in affordable models.
post #3 of 4
Quote:
Originally Posted by Evoly View Post

I always used pro art series monitors for my "serious" work and actually never cared about calibrating my gaming monitors.
Calibration settings will not apply in 99.9% of games.
post #4 of 4
Quote:
Originally Posted by zalbard View Post

Calibration settings will not apply in 99.9% of games.

Spyder software will automatically apply saved calibration settings per-monitor if a game or program randomly resets the calibration settings.
New Posts  All Forums:Forum Nav:
  Return Home
  Back to Forum: Monitors and Displays
Overclock.net › Forums › Components › Monitors and Displays › Question about Screen calibration tools like the "Spyder"