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i7 4770k adaptive voltage

post #1 of 10
Thread Starter 
Hi

After getting a stable overclock is it best to keep the voltage as is or switch it to adaptive? If not adaptive as ive read it can send the voltage way high, is there a better way to lower the voltage when idle?
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post #2 of 10
Do adaptive, the CPU will have lower idle temps and live longer while consuming less power. It will overvolt a lot in synthetic benchmarks but not in realworld use. You will be fine smile.gif Use AIDA 64 to validate your voltage, as it's one of the programs that do not allow the CPU to go over.
post #3 of 10
Quote:
Originally Posted by Buckers79 View Post

If not adaptive as ive read it can send the voltage way high, is there a better way to lower the voltage when idle?

The best way to lower the voltage and lower CPU power consumption when idle is to simply enable either the C6 or C7 core C State for Haswell. When a computer is idle at the desktop, individual cores can spend over 99% of the time in C6 or C7. In these states, the cores are disconnected from the voltage rail and will be getting virtually zero volts. The best Adaptive voltage setting is nowhere near that efficient. You can use the Windows High Performance profile with C States enabled and your idle core temperatures will be lower compared to using only adaptive voltage.

Haswell C States are significantly improved compared to previous generations. If your overclock is truly stable, you can enable the core C States without any issues. I leave the package C States disabled when overclocking. This program will show you what C States you have enabled.

RealTemp T|I Edition
https://www.sendspace.com/file/55yvry
post #4 of 10
Quote:
Originally Posted by unclewebb View Post

The best way to lower the voltage and lower CPU power consumption when idle is to simply enable either the C6 or C7 core C State for Haswell. When a computer is idle at the desktop, individual cores can spend over 99% of the time in C6 or C7. In these states, the cores are disconnected from the voltage rail and will be getting virtually zero volts. The best Adaptive voltage setting is nowhere near that efficient. You can use the Windows High Performance profile with C States enabled and your idle core temperatures will be lower compared to using only adaptive voltage.

Haswell C States are significantly improved compared to previous generations. If your overclock is truly stable, you can enable the core C States without any issues. I leave the package C States disabled when overclocking. This program will show you what C States you have enabled.

RealTemp T|I Edition
https://www.sendspace.com/file/55yvry

Why do you leave the package C states disabled when you overclock?
post #5 of 10
Quote:
Originally Posted by kevindd992002 View Post

Why do you leave the package C states disabled when you overclock?

I think that "habit" was transferred from Sandy/Ivy bridge but thats just me. Disabling them technically gives more stability since the speed and voltage will remain constant..

..and so is our electric bill constantly asking us to pay more because of disabled C states!
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post #6 of 10
Quote:
Originally Posted by Dyaems View Post

I think that "habit" was transferred from Sandy/Ivy bridge but thats just me. Disabling them technically gives more stability since the speed and voltage will remain constant..

..and so is our electric bill constantly asking us to pay more because of disabled C states!

I understand. Although, unclewebb is an advocate of C states and I was just assuming that he keeps the C states enabled even with overclocking.
post #7 of 10
When overclocking, I found better light load stability when the package C States were disabled.

If you are overclocking and you are interested in saving power, you can try enabling both the core C states and the package C States. If you have any light load stability issues then I would leave the core C States enabled and I would disable the package C States. I think they are responsible for some light load BSOD problems when your CPU is significantly overclocked and living on the edge of stability.

Many people have a problem and they immediately disable all C States. That is usually not necessary. On most motherboards, you can choose to only disable the package C States.
post #8 of 10
Quote:
Originally Posted by unclewebb View Post

When overclocking, I found better light load stability when the package C States were disabled.

If you are overclocking and you are interested in saving power, you can try enabling both the core C states and the package C States. If you have any light load stability issues then I would leave the core C States enabled and I would disable the package C States. I think they are responsible for some light load BSOD problems when your CPU is significantly overclocked and living on the edge of stability.

Many people have a problem and they immediately disable all C States. That is usually not necessary. On most motherboards, you can choose to only disable the package C States.

Well, on my motherboard I only have options to disable C1E, C3 Report, and C6 Report. Which are the core C states and which are the package C states there?
post #9 of 10
It looks like your board does not allow you to toggle on and off the Package C States.

After you enable C3 Report and C6 Report, try running RealTemp T|I Edition (download link in post 3) and see if any of the package C States are enabled. Some motherboards decided to disable these because of stability issues. Many Asus ROG laptops had BSOD issues that were directly related to the Package C States so I wouldn't be surprised if these are disabled in your bios.
post #10 of 10
Quote:
Originally Posted by unclewebb View Post

It looks like your board does not allow you to toggle on and off the Package C States.

After you enable C3 Report and C6 Report, try running RealTemp T|I Edition (download link in post 3) and see if any of the package C States are enabled. Some motherboards decided to disable these because of stability issues. Many Asus ROG laptops had BSOD issues that were directly related to the Package C States so I wouldn't be surprised if these are disabled in your bios.

I just did that and it seems that the C2, C3, and C6 package states have values on them and I assume those are enabled then.
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