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Per Core Overclocking Help

post #1 of 9
Thread Starter 
hey guys I'm a bit confused when I found out the max for my system stable at 4.7ghz with 1.31vcore anyway I'm trying to use Per Core method to push my
first 2 cores to 4.8ghz..... when I set in bios using Per Core I set at 4.8ghz 4.8ghz 4.7ghz 4.7ghz and hit save load into OS got to desktop... I ran
Cinebench and couple other stress test program and all my cores reads is 4.7ghz only 4.7ghz frown.gif why is that I had it set at 4.8 4.8 4.7 4.7ghz in bios
post #2 of 9
Thread Starter 
can anyone help me out please?? I'm a bit confused I started using Adaptive mode and it still reads 4.7ghz max I only set 1 core to 4.8ghz
only reading 4.7ghz on all cores its setup as 4.8 4.7 4.7 4.7ghz in bios with C states enabled... do I need more Vcore to push that 1 core 4.8ghz??
post #3 of 9
Thread Starter 
Dang did this Forum die or something cause nobody ever talks anymore thumbsdownsmileyanim.gif
post #4 of 9
"Per core" clock refers to the maximum frequency when that many cores are being used at any one time. What this means is, if you set:

4.8GHz for "one core" aka "1 core limit" - when the system is using ONLY one core, then the frequency will = 4.8GHz
4.8GHz for "two cores" aka "2 core limit" - when the system is using TWO cores, then the frequency will = 4.8GHz.
Now, we have set our "one core" and "two cores" frequencies. What happens when the system needs to use 3 cores?
The answer is, it will go back to using the default ratio of 4.7GHz for THREE or MORE cores, as you defined a maximum frequency for 3, 4 core limits as "4.7GHz" in your BIOS.

In Cinebench or other benchmarking programmes, the programmes ask the CPU: "give us lots of power, we need to do a LOT of work".
CPU responds by going: "OK, I'm going to give you ALL my cores".
CPU then refers to your max frequencies, and looks at them for the max core limit, "4 cores" in your case.
CPU sees that for "4 cores", the frequency has to be "4.7GHz".
So the CPU says "OK, all you cores go to 4.7GHz". Hence, 4.7GHz in benchmarks.

Now, in VLC media player for example, VLC says to the CPU: "hey CPU, I don't need all your power, only give me enough to render this video".
CPU goes: "OK, you only need two cores for this".
CPU looks at frequency table. CPU sets "4.8GHz" for "two cores" active.
post #5 of 9
Thread Starter 
Quote:
Originally Posted by Desolutional View Post

"Per core" clock refers to the maximum frequency when that many cores are being used at any one time. What this means is, if you set:

4.8GHz for "one core" aka "1 core limit" - when the system is using ONLY one core, then the frequency will = 4.8GHz
4.8GHz for "two cores" aka "2 core limit" - when the system is using TWO cores, then the frequency will = 4.8GHz.
Now, we have set our "one core" and "two cores" frequencies. What happens when the system needs to use 3 cores?
The answer is, it will go back to using the default ratio of 4.7GHz for THREE or MORE cores, as you defined a maximum frequency for 3, 4 core limits as "4.7GHz" in your BIOS.

In Cinebench or other benchmarking programmes, the programmes ask the CPU: "give us lots of power, we need to do a LOT of work".
CPU responds by going: "OK, I'm going to give you ALL my cores".
CPU then refers to your max frequencies, and looks at them for the max core limit, "4 cores" in your case.
CPU sees that for "4 cores", the frequency has to be "4.7GHz".
So the CPU says "OK, all you cores go to 4.7GHz". Hence, 4.7GHz in benchmarks.

Now, in VLC media player for example, VLC says to the CPU: "hey CPU, I don't need all your power, only give me enough to render this video".
CPU goes: "OK, you only need two cores for this".
CPU looks at frequency table. CPU sets "4.8GHz" for "two cores" active.

thanks for the info so even if I set 4.8ghz on 2 cores and the last 2 cores 4.7ghz is it still reading 4.8ghz?? cause I cant seem to figure it out
even playing High End movies like Thor 1080p all the cores locks at 4.7ghz some reason which is confusing... I aint seen a 4.8ghz all day ]
when stress testing and benchmarks and even VLC playing 1080p Thor movie :/
post #6 of 9
Windows is going to try to schedule tasks across all the cores as much as possible, so there may be enough load to keep it at the "more than 2" core setting all the time. Which is why pretty much no one uses per core overclocking.

It's really not worth the hassle, especially when you factor in that you don't know which cores will be active, so you don't know which cores will be at 4.8 - so all the cores need to be able to do 4.8 or you will be unstable. And if all cores can do 4.8 anyway, why not just set it to run them all that speed all the time. The only advantage to per core is a thermal benefit from running slower under heavier loads.
Edited by Forceman - 5/19/15 at 8:07pm
post #7 of 9
Thread Starter 
Quote:
Originally Posted by Forceman View Post

Windows is going to try to schedule tasks across all the cores as much as possible, so there may be enough load to keep it at the "more than 2" core setting all the time. Which is why pretty much no one uses per core overclocking.

It's really not worth the hassle, especially when you factor in that you don't know which cores will be active, so you don't know which cores will be at 4.8 - so all the cores need to be able to do 4.8 or you will be unstable. And if all cores can do 4.8 anyway, why not just set it to run them all that speed all the time. The only advantage to per core is a thermal benefit from running slower under heavier loads.

oh ya okay cause I would love to sync all cores at 4.8ghz but it was max vcore voltage of 1.4++vcore to keep it stable... I have found it stable at 4.7ghz at 1.31vcore
idk why 4.8ghz needs more then 1.45vcore :/ before on my overclocking this cpu on another motherboard MSI mobo i reached 4.9ghz stable 24/7 but on this Asus Rog mobo
I cant keep it stable at 4.8 or 4.9ghz anymore mad.gif

post #8 of 9
Thread Starter 
on my other motherboard it wasnt watercooled at besides the cpu itself but my new system build is all watercooling cpu,ram,mobo and I cant even reach 4.9ghz on this crappy mobo

post #9 of 9
Watercooling doesn't guarantee high clocks. To get high clocks, it is a combination of voltages and temperature, mainly voltages. If you can't reach 5GHz with less than 1.4 Vcore, then just stick with what you have. It isn't worth killing your chip over. That extra 0.3GHz won't even be useful in normal system operation - and will also cause temperatures to be much higher than needed. Your next step up in performance would be to try overclocking the cache or RAM.
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