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ASUS X99 Sabertooth Owners Thread - Page 68

post #671 of 1958
Though I'm not sure what that means, it sure sounds very nice, congratulations on your result!

I agree with you, X99 is a real performer.

drunken.gif
post #672 of 1958
Quote:
Originally Posted by Lykorian View Post

Attitude...

Don't call someone out based on attitude then deliver the same thing, you could of given that information better without being condescending and rude. If your reply is "well I'm tired of repeating myself" then don't repeat yourself. This forum is a place to learn and share passion for tech, not to correct someone and post the way you did.

I was thinking of joining this club but if you're the sort of person in here kicking off then I'd rather not bother and just teach myself the hard way. Thanks for the heads up on Asus' stress test, even if I did stop reading half way through due to how you explained it.
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post #673 of 1958
Just join mate.
post #674 of 1958
As you see Benjiw, I joined this community only 4 days ago, maybe I do understand where your reluctance to join in comes from.

Otherwise, If you expect, in a thread dedicated to a motherboard that focuses on overclock and stability, to get a snotty

Quote:
Originally Posted by mus1mus View Post

No way I'm killin 7 chips. doh.gif


... when you mention Prime95, OCCT or IBT, than you must have different expectations than I do.
I will tell you that I found that reply rather disturbing and downright bizarre.
(though yes, I am aware of the latest Prime95 version's "reputation" and the debates it has sparked, but that is another subject altogether).

We're talking about Prime95 for Cleopatra's sake, it's been used by the overclocking community since the dawn of the pyramids! medieval.gif
(I hope you get the premeditated humoristic ignorance in that and not interpret it as condescending attitude).


Anyway, it may have irritated me a bit too much, that's why I chose to calibrate my answer to that that kind of attitude by replying in a more elaborated manner (despite being slightly sarcastic).
Also, I trust that most users will take the best out of my well intended reply and ignore the childish shallow toxicity between me and mus1mus. cheers.gif

In the end I would like to add that my previous...previous post (the long one) does not advocate for the so called right way of testing for overclock stability, contrary to the so called wrong way (adopted by many users, namely ASUS Realbench ONLY - for a number of runs/hours ).
I am merely suggesting one of the many hard ways, certainly not the hardest, because in my experience and many others' it's more future proof.


What is "future proof" when it comes to overclocking stability ?
Very many of the people I know and are into overclocking, whenever they run into a problem after (let's say 6 months) they temporarily revert back to stock settings in order "to be sure"
and from then on a weird investigation begins, with coming back and forth from OC profile to stock in order to sniff the culprit (very unorthodox and time consuming).

Also, many of them end up giving up their overclocked settings altogether after 1 or 2 years - when usually more problems arise - and permanently revert back to stock values because "it's safer anyway but overclocking was fun, will do it again for the next computer, maybe I can get to 5Ghz with the next generation of CPUs."

That's exactly what "future proof" (aka STABLE) intends NOT to be.
Not getting BSODs for years and more likely ever, no matter what you throw at that particular machine.
(and yes, there is a VERY extensive array of things a PC computer can do, unlike an Apple).
- please, joke detected, no aggressive boxing3.gif

Why should one care? "I get an error, I go my friend google, find out what's causing it and fix it, EAZY!"
Some if not most users who are into overclocking (but not necessarily), don't really appreciate a sign of instability and the associate delay in their work it needs to get fixed.
Who doesn't appreciate a computer that is running flawlessly for years without a BSOD?
(besides Apple users but they're running stock so who gives a pyramid? upsidedwnsmiley.gif)

Unless one is building computers (or the other various derivatives) for a living, most users will not be permanently connected to the changes they did to the stock values,
hence the effort and discomfort they will experience after...let's say 2-3 years - when the first BSODs (plural) appear - is or will be major & severe.
Also, by that times some of the parts' warranties begin to expire or the vendor had disappeared (not everybody has the chance of buying from new newegg or Amazon and benefit of the true warranty certificate) and new kind of questions & doubts arise.

e.g. My ASUS X99 Sabertooth's warranty is 3 years (I can find vendors in my country that are "offering" only 2 years) whereas Newegg lists the same motherboard as having 5 years warranty
Can one imagine the variance of the warranty period across multiple parts and various continents & countries?
Some situations are simply appalling.
But I digress again.


Every time I start to post something I try my best to keep it short.
Obviously I've failed again as this post is again, gargantuan, so I will try to summarize what stable / "future proof" means to me.

My personal experience & my reaction to past and near to far future eventual BSODs (or any other type of error for that matter):

1.drivers (most likely, they change alot in the course of a computer's lifespan, unlike BIOS revisions)
2.operating system (rare) (anyways, thanks Bill! thumb.gif)
3.independent of OC (aka not degradation) hardware failure (it should depend only on individual luck)

I don't get to blame the OC settings because if I end up doing that it means that I did a sloppy job.
Prime95 amongst other stress-testing software has helped me obtain this level of certainty about my OC profile.
(overclocking since 1999, I dread the days when Prime95 was not around)


Also, overclocking for many is the genuine desire and passion to bring their component's potential to its relative max and then....ENJOY it for the longest possible.
Well, if I expect the longest, than I should invest the longest, within reason.
(or get very lucky either with batches or settings, but that's rare as one can imagine, the higher one goes away from stock values).

That obviously takes time (weeks) and it's many times very frustrating but it certainly compensates
with the reward of having a computer you can trust when you need it the most.
This kind of a thorough approach also allows one to have a deeper and more significant understanding
of what they're doing and the effects of those particular modifications done to stock values.

The immediate consequence of that is a greater comprehension of the overall platform, its capacity and yes...its (safe/stable) limits.



P.S. regarding Prime95 usage

There are different "schools of thought" on this matter and the debates around this subject in the past 2 years have been anything but calm.
Despite the heat (ironic) that the debates around this topic dissipates, there is no general consensus of what Prime95 version should be used for stress-testing, be it for 10 minutes or 24h+
(some say v26.x, others v27.x, few say v28.5+)
When I bring up Prime95 (relative to Haswell-E generation), I'm only talking about v27.9 which is considered by some as the latest "safe" version of it.

And because words should be sustained with proof, here is the result of yesterday's test for the "summer profile".
Yes, I know it's low but it's what I need for that machine and it's also a 1st try on voltages for this particular result (1st try after spending weeks on much higher profiles bulb.gif)
Will try lower settings.

CPU & MEM: 4Ghz (125x32) - XMP (2666-13-14-14-39) - UNCORE/CACHE 4Ghz (125x32)

BIOS VOLTAGES:
Input Voltage=1.8
Core Voltage (adaptive): +0.125
VSSA (adaptive)=+0.300
UNCORE/CACHE (adaptive)=+0.300

BIOS SETTINGS
VRM Spread Spectrum=Enabled ---> CPU Power Phase=Optimized
LLC=Level 9
CPU Integrated VR Fault Management=Disabled
CPU SVID Support=Disabled
VRM Spread Spectrum=Disabled
C States and EIST Enabled (I like the CPU to rest when not under load, hence the adaptive on voltages too)

Room temp varying from 25.5 to 26.8 Celsius (no windows opened, no doors leading to outside opened, no AC running, yes, it matters)




IDLE in the same conditions as above:
- highest for 3 cores is 31 Celsius (#0,#1,#5)
- 2 cores at 30 Celsius (#2,#3)
- lowest for 1 core at 29 Celsius (#4)

Why the Prime95 (Blend, Small & Large FFT)?
Because if it runs Prime95 (Blend in my experience) for 24h+ it will run anything else for any amount of time.
Edited by Lykorian - 2/2/16 at 7:23pm
post #675 of 1958
Sorry, what is that again?

Prime 95 whut? I have no recollection mentioning that prior to this. So get another person to quote. buttkick.gif

post your sentiments here. You might win a few more audience.
post #676 of 1958
Ok guys, let's tone it down a bit here. Personal comments have no place in this thread.

If you want to debate certain aspects then let's do so in a respectful manner.

Thanks.
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post #677 of 1958
Guys I have a question for you X99 Sabertooth owners. Does ANYBODY here have 128GB of non-ECC DDR4 in their X99 Sabertooth? Especially if in conjunction with a 5820K.

Here is some background on me.

I am a longtime PC tweaker and builder and I work in the software industry. As of late my work is starting to involve photogrammetry software which requires large amounts of computational resources, so all the CPU and RAM and GPU that I can get will be beneficial to cranking out work units. It's not unlike Folding or other similar work.

So I've decided to use this as an excuse to upgrade my personal computer setup from Sandy Bridge 2500K and 16GB RAM, GTX 670 to:

i7 5820K
X99 Sabertooth
2 pairs of 2x16GB G.Skill Ripjaws V Series DDR4-2400

I'm going to cool this with a Noctua DH15. Overclocking will be attempted since this is my personal system but stability is paramount, so I will be conservative about it.

I have not purchased a GPU yet but I am basically trying to figure out which 980Ti to get biggrin.gif

I really like the way the Sabertooth looks. Also it's got lots of features that ostensibly are geared toward stability and robustness, which I like. 5 year warranty helps there too. But there is much talk I see about ASUS RMA process being bad. This is making me nervous, but I look at other options available to me in the $300 X99 mobo range and I just don't see much that is better. Perhaps the EVGA EATX X99 mobos? They are 3 year warranty, even the Classified, which is pushing on $400. Anyways that's how I landed on Sabertooth.

Now back to my question about RAM, while 64GB is clearly already overkill for any kind of usual gaming or workstation workload, I will on occasion, desire to crunch datasets on the order of 100 gigabytes. So since today it already only costs <$400 to obtain 64GB of DDR4 (and even cheaper than this for DDR3, really) it is reasonable for me to ask the question of could I expect to be able to harness all 128GB of ram with a 5820K. A fun activity I imagine is to load up the majority of it as a RAM disk, and then run some game installers or straight up copy various resource files onto the RAM disk, say, from a nice and speedy solid state drive. This basically provides some unbeatable storage data throughput speeds. It can totally be useful.

So I have a few points I'm fuzzy on. Because I'm at some sort of bleeding edge, and reliable information is difficult to find this far away from the mainstream.


1. (This is hopefully easy to answer, and since I've ordered the stuff I'll find it out soon myself anyway) Can I expect 16GB density DDR4 sticks to work properly in the Sabertooth?

2. I'd like to try to find someone who's tested it themselves about whether Haswell-E in general or 5820K is actually physically able to address 128GB. At the time of the processor's release no 16GB density DIMMs existed. But they do now and I bought 4 16GB DIMMs for about the same price as 8 8GB DIMMs cost, so I am hoping that my no-brainer (less DIMMs is better than more DIMMs if they contain the same amount of bits!) will leave open the 128GB upgrade option. If not, no worries, maybe all I'm missing out on is some RAM overclockability. At least, I figured it was a no-brainer, but now I read the fine print where various components like my mobo and CPU state that max supported memory is 64GB.
Edited by unphased - 2/3/16 at 7:52pm
post #678 of 1958
Quote:
Originally Posted by unphased View Post



1. (This is hopefully easy to answer, and since I've ordered the stuff I'll find it out soon myself anyway) Can I expect 16GB density DDR4 sticks to work properly in the Sabertooth?

2. I'd like to try to find someone who's tested it themselves about whether Haswell-E in general or 5820K is actually physically able to address 128GB. At the time of the processor's release no 16GB density DIMMs existed. But they do now and I bought 4 16GB DIMMs for about the same price as 8 8GB DIMMs cost, so I am hoping that my no-brainer (less DIMMs is better than more DIMMs if they contain the same amount of bits!) will leave open the 128GB upgrade option. If not, no worries, maybe all I'm missing out on is some RAM overclockability. At least, I figured it was a no-brainer, but now I read the fine print where various components like my mobo and CPU state that max supported memory is 64GB.


I am in the same boat as you. My work simply needs loads of RAM, the more the merrier. I send most of my public work to local super computer cluster while using my PC for private sector work. Those Xeons have plenty of RAM to work with, 768GB as a matter of fact. For my PC I have to make do with just 32GB for now.

Answer to 1: Check post #507

Answer to 2: http://www.pcworld.com/article/2938855/hardcore-hardware-we-stuffed-this-pc-with-128gb-of-cutting-edge-ddr4-ram.html

Welcome to OCN, it's safer here.biggrin.gif
Edited by xkm1948 - 2/3/16 at 9:38pm
post #679 of 1958
Awesome, yeah it's a bit spendy but 64 is already enough for me to get my ramdisk game on, plus I can probably also justify skipping the complex experience of an NVMe SSD situation, and stick to swapping around SATA disks seeing as how I might also want to be booting back and forth into Linux and Windows.


Sent from my iPhone using Tapatalk
post #680 of 1958
I toyed with the idea of getting a PCIE 4x Intel SSD for a while. In the end I feel the overall increase in efficiency for my work will be less comparing to 128GB of speedy DDR4. 32GB is really bottle necking me a lot. Constant transferring of intermediate data from RAM to SSD and to my HDD takes more than half of the entire work time.rolleyes.gif
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