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Samsung Magician for Linux Not Recognizing Drive

post #1 of 6
Thread Starter 
I have been running a Samsung 840 SSD drive on my Slackware server since August of 2013 that gets heavy read/write use (sendmail/web/data collection) and I was curious how its health was doing so today I download “samsung_magician_dc-v1.0_rtm_p2.tar.gz” from the Samsung web site. When I ran “./magician –L” however it responds with “No Samsung SSD found!”. Both “Hard Disk Sentinel for LINUX console 0.08” and “smartctl 5.43 2012-06-30 r3573 [x86_64-linux-3.14.33]” find it just fine so I am at a loss as to why the Samsung magician utility cannot find it.

The drive is a Samsung SSD 840 Series, 120 GB with firmware DXT08B0Q.

Any idea why the magician does not recognize the drive?
post #2 of 6

I believe that the Linux software that Samsung provides is only for their business/data center grade SSD lineup, not their consumer line of SSDs.

post #3 of 6
Thread Starter 
Bummer. Considering I could find nothing else for Linux in their support area and no support contact information, I will assume I am fresh out of luck. A lesson learned. Check out the support BEFORE buying a product. I seriously doubt if I will be purchasing Samung SSD drives in the future for PCs or servers and now regret my past purchases, not that Sansung really cares I am sure. Thanks for taking the time to reply.
post #4 of 6

Basically it comes down to the fact that Linux isn't a very supported operating system. Most companies don't want to put the money into supporting what represents a tiny portion of the user market. The majority of people run Windows therefore they're going to support that platform the most.

 

Firmware updates can still be done via a bootable ISO file that you can either burn to a disk or write to a USB flash drive to run for those running an alternative OS such as Linux. Monitoring of the SSD can be done via S.M.A.R.T. utilities that often come as part of a standard Linux distribution so you can monitor the SSD with that.

 

Truth be told, the Samsung Magician software isn't really needed to be installed. I'm not saying that it isn't a nice thing to have but is it absolutely needed? Not at all. You can still run and use the SSD without the software installed. Some users don't even install it for they find it to be useless.

post #5 of 6
Thread Starter 
Quote:
Originally Posted by trparky View Post

Basically it comes down to the fact that Linux isn't a very supported operating system. Most companies don't want to put the money into supporting what represents a tiny portion of the user market. The majority of people run Windows therefore they're going to support that platform the most.


The proverbial case of which comes first, the chicken or the egg, and it has been discussed ad infinitum in regard to Linux. I do not think either of us wants to go down that road smile.gif
Quote:
Firmware updates can still be done via a bootable ISO file that you can either burn to a disk or write to a USB flash drive to run for those running an alternative OS such as Linux.


True, but that is not the ideal case for a working server that users depend on.

Quote:
Monitoring of the SSD can be done via S.M.A.R.T. utilities that often come as part of a standard Linux distribution so you can monitor the SSD with that.

Also true, and I have since found some information on the attributes in a Samsung white paper that provided more insight into what smartctl reports so I have the information I was looking for

Quote:
Truth be told, the Samsung Magician software isn't really needed to be installed. I'm not saying that it isn't a nice thing to have but is it absolutely needed? Not at all. You can still run and use the SSD without the software installed. Some users don't even install it for they find it to be useless.


That may be, but the fact that it is not even offered for Linux users prompted me to look at the Sandisk, OCZ, and other sites of SDD manufacturers and they all supported Linux, had manufacturer supported forums, and a form to fill out or email address to contact support. Sandisk even has live chat. Samsung as near as I can tell has no way of contacting support for help, no manufacturer supported forum and does not even mention Linux in regard to their standard line of SDD drives. To be frank, that is not a company I would consider doing business with in the future for Windows or Linux.
post #6 of 6

Yeah, Samsung isn't the most shall we say, open company when it comes to finding support for their products. They really do need to get better ways of getting support into play here. I'm not going to defend Samsung since they have done a lot of wrong lately regarding their SSD products and have just recent owned up and repaired their mistakes as best as they could. They shouldn't be defended, they screwed up, they need to own up to their issues.

 

Samsung isn't the only company to not support Linux. Both AMD's graphics department (formally known as ATi) and nVidia have all but written off the Linux operating system. Until Linux gains some ground in the desktop market that won't change. In order to do that... well, let's just say that that's a discussion that would take this thread way off topic and could stir up a hornet's nest the likes of which we've never seen before. I have my thoughts on the subject but I won't state them here.

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