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New build

post #1 of 6
Thread Starter 
Started buying parts for my new build back in December, this month I finaly got money for the Intel i7-5960X and next month will be the final piece, Corsair Dominator DDR4 3200MHz.

I bought the cabinett from Mountain Mods and started with the water cooling parts 4 months or so ago. Been going slowly as the build is changing as I go and even though I had most parts for the W/C before I started there's always one or 2 more I need. As of now the W/C is finished except and extention to the tank (I want it as high as the highest point of the loop) and 1 90 degree svivel and 2 30 degree svivels.

My last build, 2 years back, was a complete mess and I had to rebuild it. The reason for the mess was mostly due to the cabinet beeing too small for everything I wanted inside it (DangerDen about twice the width of a tower cabinet). This time it's an Ascension CYO with more than enough room.

There are, as I said, modifications all the time, but I have the final setup of the loop now. There are 2 pressure meters in the loop, 1 at the resrvoir to meassure the water level (mostly for fun) and one on the filter, which will give me an alarm if theres clogging in the system. One of the things I learned from my last build is that a filter is a must so the CPU block don't get clogged.

The loop is: Out of reservoir, through pump 1 and 2 (temp sensor) to the flow meter, to the filter (with pressure meeter), to the CPU (temp sensor) to the GPU (temp sensor), to the MOSFET (temp sensor), to the X79 (temp sensor), to the bottom of the radiator and then back to the reservoir. I have drainage at the lowest point of the loop on the MB side, the bottom of the radiator and the bottom of the reservoir. There are fill points (airventing possibilities) on the top of the reservoir and at the exit of the filter, which is the highest point of the loop.

I'll post some pictures later today or tomorrow, those I have on the iPad are too old, as I said, things are changing along the road. smile.gif
post #2 of 6
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post #3 of 6
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post #4 of 6
Nice build SverreMunthe! That is one heck of a case too. Calling it a cabinet is very apropos!
So what did your old CPU block end up getting blocked with that you would want a filter in-line before it this time?
post #5 of 6
Thread Starter 
Quote:
Originally Posted by Osco View Post

Nice build SverreMunthe! That is one heck of a case too. Calling it a cabinet is very apropos!
So what did your old CPU block end up getting blocked with that you would want a filter in-line before it this time?

The filter is more of a precaution and together with the pressure meter it will tell me if anything has been cought, and of course, it's fun, whatever you put in there. A bit uncertain about turbulense at all the Q- and T-blocks, it migh be a nice place for air bubbles to hide and even be created, but wanting the loop to have mostly straight angles made it neccessary, and it shouldn't be much of a problem with 2 pumps. I had some "old" water coolers for my 2 internal HDD's (one of them gets extremely warm), but it didn't look good since I had to use black cardboard to cover the 2 slots, behind the tube that's suposed to be outside the case. Nice look, too much hassle.
post #6 of 6
Thread Starter 
Been doing a lot of small changes and modifications the last months, but finally things seems to be as I want them. It might not be an esthetic (spelling?) wonder, but as with my last build (first w/c PC) I've learnt a lot of stuff that I can take with me to the next build. Atm I'm hung up in calibrating and setting up the pressure/fill level/flow meters which is a pain in the ass. The water cooling looks good and everything is working. Think I'll "wash" the motherbaord etc., with some good old destilled water since there's been a couple of leaks. I know the fluid isn't electricaly conductive, but better safe than sorry. MB, GPU, CPU, RAM etc. has not been powered up yet and I really don't want the first thing that happends when I connect the power to be a bad smell of burnt out condensators. The hardest thing with building advanced computers in Norway (and the rest of Scandinavia) is that, the moment you want something out of the ordinary, you have to order from other countries (even ordinary molex connectors!). I finally found a supplier in Hong Kong that seems to have everything I need.


The first picture shows the rear of the Aquaero 6, there are also 2 PA's and a farbwerk as well as an Aquaero 5 XT converted to LT and running as slave (gives you 4 temp sensors and 4 fans).

The second picture shows the backside of the filter and the pressure meter that runs in paralell to it.

The third picture is the "water colling side" of the cabinet (the tank has a big ugly tape on it, showing different levels).

The fourth picture shows the MB side. Took me some time to decide on the colors of the cables (never, ever, ever try to go for the colors you find in the schematics of the ATX cables, a cable with violet, green, yellow, orange, light blue, grey, black, blue and red looks UGLY! smile.gif ). I've learnt a lot about sleeving, Believe me.

The bluish ligth are the led strips (4) connected to the Farbwerk. Not decided on how to use them yet, but probably not going for the "christmas tree" effect. smile.gif

Colors on cables are red/black for everything connected to the PSU, blue for Aquabus signal cables, white fir internal USB cables (probably only one, going to the Aquaero), red for tge switches and black for everything else. Some short cables (from one molex to the next, mostly) aren't sleeved because it wouldn't look very good.

The testing is done from a laptop, thus the insane amount of cables on the w/c side.
Edited by SverreMunthe - 11/14/15 at 5:55pm
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