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post #11 of 23
Kudos for tinkering and fixing as I have always supported that and will continue to do so.

BUT, when it comes to PSUs, I would in 9 cases out of 10 just replace the whole unit. That 1 case being if it was extremely expensive so maybe I could save some money up if it's an easy fix.
    
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post #12 of 23
Thread Starter 
Thanks for the comments, everyone!
Quote:
Originally Posted by Redzo View Post

Kudos for tinkering and fixing as I have always supported that and will continue to do so.

BUT, when it comes to PSUs, I would in 9 cases out of 10 just replace the whole unit. That 1 case being if it was extremely expensive so maybe I could save some money up if it's an easy fix.

Pretty much. If it was an expensive unit, I would have just sent it back for a warranty repair or replacement. But because it was such a cheap unit and the problem wasn't serious, I figured it couldn't hurt to tinker.
 
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Wild eyes (2015)
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post #13 of 23
Quote:
Originally Posted by XanderTheGoober View Post

Quote:
Originally Posted by PsYcHo29388 View Post

And my college class is teaching me that PSUs are FRUs (Field-replaceable units) as in you never try to repair one, it must be replaced.

Thanks for proving that statement wrong smile.gif
in a professional environment power supplies are just field replaceable units. It would take far more time to tear one down and try to repair it with a higher risk of electrocution than it would to just replace the unit. Not to mention clients would rather not pay someone an hours labor at $100+ an hour to repair a unit, compared with buying a unit for $50 and 15 minutes of labor to swap it out.
Yeah I know, its just that my class stresses that you CANNOT repair one at all like it is some well-known fact. My point was: Can you repair one? Yes, absolutely. Is repairing one the best course of action in the field? Not at all.
post #14 of 23
Quote:
Originally Posted by PsYcHo29388 View Post

Yeah I know, its just that my class stresses that you CANNOT repair one at all like it is some well-known fact. My point was: Can you repair one? Yes, absolutely. Is repairing one the best course of action in the field? Not at all.

Anything can be repaired with the proper skill set, tools, and parts. a lot of people are under the impression that smartphones are not repairable, yet a lot of people buy parts phones and fix them. Not rocket science but to some it is just beyond their way of thinking.
post #15 of 23
Quote:
Originally Posted by XanderTheGoober View Post

Anything can be repaired with the proper skill set, tools, and parts. a lot of people are under the impression that smartphones are not repairable, yet a lot of people buy parts phones and fix them. Not rocket science but to some it is just beyond their way of thinking.

^This.

I had a buddy that was a pretty heavy gamer and was really rough on his controllers. He would buy a new XBox 360 controller when the left thumbstick went out on him - so ~$60 each time. I went online and saw that replacement thumbsticks were 4 for $8 with free shipping. I got a cheap soldering iron, solder, and desoldering braid from good ol' Radio Shack and started repairing them myself. I spent about $25-30 at Radio Shack. Funny note, I replaced one thumbstick and it still works. I guess the replacement was better than the stock one. biggrin.gif

Also fixed my completely bricked LG G3 after an official Android update messed up my custom firmware and flash to a different carrier - thanks goes to a dumb co-worker for installing that update. Some people enjoy tinkering, others don't even want to mess with it. But pretty much anything is able to be repaired with the right skills and tools, or ability to "MacGuyver" things. biggrin.gif
post #16 of 23
the problem with those CX430's are the cheap junk capacitors. CapXon caps are junk. They upgraded the primary cap to United Chem-Con in V2.3 due to failures so you can keep that one. they still use those CrapXon caps on the secondary. a junk cap might have caused the transistor to fail. If you don't upgrade the caps the transistor is going to fry again. at least upgrade the 12v rail cap which I think is a 3300uF. I've bought several of these PSU's that have been running for years without a hiccup because I upgraded the caps before plugging them in
post #17 of 23
The CX430 PSUs I've bought during the past few years, including one I got this July, had Samxon capacitors (green) on the secondary side, which are supposed to be better than CapXon -- I don't see how anything can be worse than CapXon, which sometimes rots just in storage (Antec 500W BasiQ but not the 550W, made by a different company).
post #18 of 23
Quote:
Originally Posted by MrLinky View Post

Here's the thing: shipping this unit to Corsair for RMA costs more than buying a new one.

Then you're using the wrong carrier.

Could cost $10 to $12 to ship from Oregon to California via FedEx Ground.

But you've already voided the warranty, so I guess that's out the window now too. wink.gif Consider it a "pro tip" for the future. A lot of people assume USPS and UPS are the cheapest, but they tend to be stupidly expensive.

Good job on finding the problem, by the way. I was going to say that replacing the fan wouldn't fix anything since it would still be controlled by the same fan controller. I wish everyone had your level of patience (with electronics, that is). wink.gif
post #19 of 23
Quote:
Originally Posted by BassXtreme View Post

the problem with those CX430's are the cheap junk capacitors.

Actually. No. That's not the problem with them at all. I work at Corsair now. I've been in technical marketing for just over a year and a product manager since the beginning of this year. That's why I no longer do reviews. Of all of the CX series PSUs I've seen returned (which is an RMA rate that's around 2%, believe it or not. Lower than all of the other Corsair PSUs primarily because of less parts, therefore less parts to fail) swollen/vented secondary caps makes up for almost ZERO. And typically we would see that on a unit that ALSO had the fan fail, so it's likely that the caps overheated causing them to fail.
Quote:
Originally Posted by BassXtreme View Post

They upgraded the primary cap to United Chem-Con in V2.3 due to failures so you can keep that one. they still use those CrapXon caps on the secondary.

See above. Because they hardly ever fail. Ever. At least not in the CX series.

Biggest failure? Fan or fan controller. And up until they changed the primary cap, it was actually the primary cap that would vent. Typically these were seen in countries with bad mains. Third most common failure was primary switcher. Again: Typically seen in countries with really bad mains. This was addressed with the newest version of the CX Series. So the newest series has a Japanese primary, more robust primary switching and... oh shucks... Still has Chinese secondary caps. wink.gif
post #20 of 23
United Chem-Con are good caps. The secondary Capxon caps are junk and got changed out before I connect anything to the psu. I changed all the caps to Nichicon and the psu hasn't even burped after 3 years. I even changed the primary UC cap to Nichicon because I don't trust Corsair. The UC cap might be fake. The CX430 was $14 after rebate and the caps were $10. the fan is still going strong. still a great deal.
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