Overclock.net › Forums › Software, Programming and Coding › Coding and Programming › Words of Wisdom to new Developers.
New Posts  All Forums:Forum Nav:

Words of Wisdom to new Developers. - Page 3

post #21 of 32
Learn how the compiler works. Write your own compiler. That far and away is the biggest thing to go from black box to white box. Most people write code without any idea of why that stuff actually does what it does. It's an exercise in coincidence. "Try that". "No ok try that". It's a whole different world when you understand the underlying bits of why that text does what it does.

Likewise, learn assembly and how the hardware actually works. Always be conscious of the machine code that is going to happen from the code you just wrote. Be ever critical of everything you just wrote and always look for a better approach - there usually is.

It's like those who understand how the engine and transmission actually work are always better drivers. It amazes me how few people know about engine braking. wink.gif
stable again
(25 items)
 
  
CPUCPUMotherboardGraphics
E5-2687W E5-2687W ASUS Z9PED8-WS EVGA GTX 570 (Linux host) 
GraphicsRAMHard DriveHard Drive
EVGA GTX 970 FTW (win7 guest) 64GB G.SKILL 2133 2x Crucial M4 256GB raid1 4x 3TB raid 10 
CoolingCoolingCoolingCooling
2x Apogee HD  2x RX 480 2x MCP 655 RP-452x2 rev2 (new) 
CoolingCoolingOSOS
16x Cougar Turbine CFT12SB4 (new) EK FC 580 Gentoo (host) Gentoo (x23 guests) 
OSMonitorMonitorPower
windows 7 (guest w/ vfio-pci) Viewsonic 23" 1080P Viewsonic 19" Antec HCP Platinum 1000 (new) 
CaseOtherOther
Case Labs TH10 (still the best ever) 2x Lamptron FC-5 IOGEAR 2 way DVI KVM Switch 
  hide details  
Reply
stable again
(25 items)
 
  
CPUCPUMotherboardGraphics
E5-2687W E5-2687W ASUS Z9PED8-WS EVGA GTX 570 (Linux host) 
GraphicsRAMHard DriveHard Drive
EVGA GTX 970 FTW (win7 guest) 64GB G.SKILL 2133 2x Crucial M4 256GB raid1 4x 3TB raid 10 
CoolingCoolingCoolingCooling
2x Apogee HD  2x RX 480 2x MCP 655 RP-452x2 rev2 (new) 
CoolingCoolingOSOS
16x Cougar Turbine CFT12SB4 (new) EK FC 580 Gentoo (host) Gentoo (x23 guests) 
OSMonitorMonitorPower
windows 7 (guest w/ vfio-pci) Viewsonic 23" 1080P Viewsonic 19" Antec HCP Platinum 1000 (new) 
CaseOtherOther
Case Labs TH10 (still the best ever) 2x Lamptron FC-5 IOGEAR 2 way DVI KVM Switch 
  hide details  
Reply
post #22 of 32
Thread Starter 
Quote:
Originally Posted by lloyd mcclendon View Post

Learn how the compiler works. Write your own compiler. That far and away is the biggest thing to go from black box to white box. Most people write code without any idea of why that stuff actually does what it does. It's an exercise in coincidence. "Try that". "No ok try that". It's a whole different world when you understand the underlying bits of why that text does what it does.

Likewise, learn assembly and how the hardware actually works. Always be conscious of the machine code that is going to happen from the code you just wrote. Be ever critical of everything you just wrote and always look for a better approach - there usually is.

It's like those who understand how the engine and transmission actually work are always better drivers. It amazes me how few people know about engine braking. wink.gif

I kinda disagree... I have not written a compiler, the thought of it actually scares me as well. I spent only a day or 2 looking at assembly, and noooooooo that's not for me. I will agree with your statement when you start diving deeper into coding. I actually learn best from a Trial and Error sort of approach. When i started to learn Python, I just dove head first into a complicated script. Modifying values here and there, I was able to slowly understand what it was doing. I slowly learned the libraries that way. When i came across something I didnt know i would google it. I'd find an example for a solution and massage it until it eventually worked. I like taking an object approach to learning where i learn whats needed to solve my problem.

I have no idea how a bunch of 1's and 0's can make my display light up with billions of colors.
Zev's Comp
(15 items)
 
  
CPUMotherboardGraphicsRAM
Intel Core i5-2500K Sandy Bridge 3.3GHz GIGABYTE GA-Z68X-UD3H-B3 LGA 1155 Intel Z68 HDM... GeForce GTX 750 Ti G.SKILL Ripjaws X Series 8GB 
Hard DriveHard DriveHard DrivePower
1TB HDD 64GB SSD (Used for SRT) 500 GB. Antec BP550 Plus 550W Continuous Power ATX12V V... 
Case
COOLER MASTER ELITE 335 RC-335-KKN1-GP Black S... 
  hide details  
Reply
Zev's Comp
(15 items)
 
  
CPUMotherboardGraphicsRAM
Intel Core i5-2500K Sandy Bridge 3.3GHz GIGABYTE GA-Z68X-UD3H-B3 LGA 1155 Intel Z68 HDM... GeForce GTX 750 Ti G.SKILL Ripjaws X Series 8GB 
Hard DriveHard DriveHard DrivePower
1TB HDD 64GB SSD (Used for SRT) 500 GB. Antec BP550 Plus 550W Continuous Power ATX12V V... 
Case
COOLER MASTER ELITE 335 RC-335-KKN1-GP Black S... 
  hide details  
Reply
post #23 of 32
So you just screw around in python until it sort of works and your brain isn't capable of learning assembly.

Great advice for new developers right here, hope we are all taking notes.


thumb.gifthumb.gif
Edited by lloyd mcclendon - 11/2/15 at 7:10pm
stable again
(25 items)
 
  
CPUCPUMotherboardGraphics
E5-2687W E5-2687W ASUS Z9PED8-WS EVGA GTX 570 (Linux host) 
GraphicsRAMHard DriveHard Drive
EVGA GTX 970 FTW (win7 guest) 64GB G.SKILL 2133 2x Crucial M4 256GB raid1 4x 3TB raid 10 
CoolingCoolingCoolingCooling
2x Apogee HD  2x RX 480 2x MCP 655 RP-452x2 rev2 (new) 
CoolingCoolingOSOS
16x Cougar Turbine CFT12SB4 (new) EK FC 580 Gentoo (host) Gentoo (x23 guests) 
OSMonitorMonitorPower
windows 7 (guest w/ vfio-pci) Viewsonic 23" 1080P Viewsonic 19" Antec HCP Platinum 1000 (new) 
CaseOtherOther
Case Labs TH10 (still the best ever) 2x Lamptron FC-5 IOGEAR 2 way DVI KVM Switch 
  hide details  
Reply
stable again
(25 items)
 
  
CPUCPUMotherboardGraphics
E5-2687W E5-2687W ASUS Z9PED8-WS EVGA GTX 570 (Linux host) 
GraphicsRAMHard DriveHard Drive
EVGA GTX 970 FTW (win7 guest) 64GB G.SKILL 2133 2x Crucial M4 256GB raid1 4x 3TB raid 10 
CoolingCoolingCoolingCooling
2x Apogee HD  2x RX 480 2x MCP 655 RP-452x2 rev2 (new) 
CoolingCoolingOSOS
16x Cougar Turbine CFT12SB4 (new) EK FC 580 Gentoo (host) Gentoo (x23 guests) 
OSMonitorMonitorPower
windows 7 (guest w/ vfio-pci) Viewsonic 23" 1080P Viewsonic 19" Antec HCP Platinum 1000 (new) 
CaseOtherOther
Case Labs TH10 (still the best ever) 2x Lamptron FC-5 IOGEAR 2 way DVI KVM Switch 
  hide details  
Reply
post #24 of 32
It depends what you're doing. If you're a front end web developer it's unlikely that knowing x86 assembly will make you any more capable of debugging a DOM event handler than another who does not. You're about as far removed from the hardware as possible. You can't even anticipate what the assembly will look like because your application will run through at least three different JIT compilers that change from one version to the next (and that's ignoring the fact that some browsers have several JIT compilers).

If you're hacking away at line-of-business winforms applications then knowing assembly probably won't help much either (although it may be helpful to understand what CIL code is generated by the compiler for similar reasons).
Edited by randomizer - 11/5/15 at 12:25am
    
CPUMotherboardGraphicsRAM
i7 920 D0 MSI X58 Pro-E Gigabyte GTX 970 (GV-N970IX-4GD) 3x2GB G.Skill DDR3-1333 9-9-9-24 
Hard DriveHard DriveOptical DriveOS
840 Pro Caviar Black LG BD-ROM Windows 8.1 Pro x64 
MonitorMonitorKeyboardPower
Dell U2713HM Dell U2311H Turbo-Trak (Google it :D) Corsair HX-520 
CaseMouseMouse PadAudio
CM690 Mionix Avior 7000 Everglide Titan AKG K 242 HD 
  hide details  
Reply
    
CPUMotherboardGraphicsRAM
i7 920 D0 MSI X58 Pro-E Gigabyte GTX 970 (GV-N970IX-4GD) 3x2GB G.Skill DDR3-1333 9-9-9-24 
Hard DriveHard DriveOptical DriveOS
840 Pro Caviar Black LG BD-ROM Windows 8.1 Pro x64 
MonitorMonitorKeyboardPower
Dell U2713HM Dell U2311H Turbo-Trak (Google it :D) Corsair HX-520 
CaseMouseMouse PadAudio
CM690 Mionix Avior 7000 Everglide Titan AKG K 242 HD 
  hide details  
Reply
post #25 of 32
Sure, some really great JS devs out there don't know a lick of assembly and that's fair. (JS is a whole different discussion - the easiest programming language to use, the hardest one to truly understand. What's that quote, the easiest language everyone knows how to misuse .. something like that).

Anyway, what x86 helped me understand was what the processor had to do when I wrote some high level code. Hmm that's going to require a lot more machine code than this. That was my point above. Knowing assembly is very far from a practical thing to use for a lot of devs absolutely, but it's the underlying mindset and concept to always keep in mind as you write code that was quite helpful in my experience.

I'd go back to the analogy of understanding how the engine and transmission work. Once I learned how the manual transmission actually worked, I suddenly knew how to drive it properly.


Ah, the quote is "JavaScript is the only language people feel like they don't need to learn to use." thumb.gif
stable again
(25 items)
 
  
CPUCPUMotherboardGraphics
E5-2687W E5-2687W ASUS Z9PED8-WS EVGA GTX 570 (Linux host) 
GraphicsRAMHard DriveHard Drive
EVGA GTX 970 FTW (win7 guest) 64GB G.SKILL 2133 2x Crucial M4 256GB raid1 4x 3TB raid 10 
CoolingCoolingCoolingCooling
2x Apogee HD  2x RX 480 2x MCP 655 RP-452x2 rev2 (new) 
CoolingCoolingOSOS
16x Cougar Turbine CFT12SB4 (new) EK FC 580 Gentoo (host) Gentoo (x23 guests) 
OSMonitorMonitorPower
windows 7 (guest w/ vfio-pci) Viewsonic 23" 1080P Viewsonic 19" Antec HCP Platinum 1000 (new) 
CaseOtherOther
Case Labs TH10 (still the best ever) 2x Lamptron FC-5 IOGEAR 2 way DVI KVM Switch 
  hide details  
Reply
stable again
(25 items)
 
  
CPUCPUMotherboardGraphics
E5-2687W E5-2687W ASUS Z9PED8-WS EVGA GTX 570 (Linux host) 
GraphicsRAMHard DriveHard Drive
EVGA GTX 970 FTW (win7 guest) 64GB G.SKILL 2133 2x Crucial M4 256GB raid1 4x 3TB raid 10 
CoolingCoolingCoolingCooling
2x Apogee HD  2x RX 480 2x MCP 655 RP-452x2 rev2 (new) 
CoolingCoolingOSOS
16x Cougar Turbine CFT12SB4 (new) EK FC 580 Gentoo (host) Gentoo (x23 guests) 
OSMonitorMonitorPower
windows 7 (guest w/ vfio-pci) Viewsonic 23" 1080P Viewsonic 19" Antec HCP Platinum 1000 (new) 
CaseOtherOther
Case Labs TH10 (still the best ever) 2x Lamptron FC-5 IOGEAR 2 way DVI KVM Switch 
  hide details  
Reply
post #26 of 32
I think that is primarily useful when you have a complex performance problem or you're deploying in a very resource-constrained environment. Normally you'd want to get the code working to spec before being concerned about performance, and write tests to enable refactoring later if necessary. Following that you'd want to go for the low hanging fruit and ensure that really slow operations aren't getting in the way of a smooth experience. Nobody will notice a few wasted microseconds when you are spending 100ms writing to disk and blocking the UI thread!

Worrying about the machine code on your first pass is almost always wasting time IMO. That sort of pedantry gives rise to questions like "is it faster to increment or decrement a loop counter?". Always profile before trying to guess what is slowing you down. If you can't measure the problem then it's not a problem. If you can measure it and you didn't write unit tests then you have two problems. smile.gif

Now I'm not arguing against knowing how things work at a lower level. However, most performance problems can be identified at a much higher level than the assembly code. One does not need to know what assembly instructions are executed in order to understand why excessive string concatenation is slow in some languages.

And yes, JS is very poorly understood. That's largely the result of the many awful tutorials around the net.
Edited by randomizer - 11/6/15 at 12:40am
    
CPUMotherboardGraphicsRAM
i7 920 D0 MSI X58 Pro-E Gigabyte GTX 970 (GV-N970IX-4GD) 3x2GB G.Skill DDR3-1333 9-9-9-24 
Hard DriveHard DriveOptical DriveOS
840 Pro Caviar Black LG BD-ROM Windows 8.1 Pro x64 
MonitorMonitorKeyboardPower
Dell U2713HM Dell U2311H Turbo-Trak (Google it :D) Corsair HX-520 
CaseMouseMouse PadAudio
CM690 Mionix Avior 7000 Everglide Titan AKG K 242 HD 
  hide details  
Reply
    
CPUMotherboardGraphicsRAM
i7 920 D0 MSI X58 Pro-E Gigabyte GTX 970 (GV-N970IX-4GD) 3x2GB G.Skill DDR3-1333 9-9-9-24 
Hard DriveHard DriveOptical DriveOS
840 Pro Caviar Black LG BD-ROM Windows 8.1 Pro x64 
MonitorMonitorKeyboardPower
Dell U2713HM Dell U2311H Turbo-Trak (Google it :D) Corsair HX-520 
CaseMouseMouse PadAudio
CM690 Mionix Avior 7000 Everglide Titan AKG K 242 HD 
  hide details  
Reply
post #27 of 32
Thread Starter 
Quote:
Originally Posted by lloyd mcclendon View Post

So you just screw around in python until it sort of works and your brain isn't capable of learning assembly.

Great advice for new developers right here, hope we are all taking notes.
thumb.gifthumb.gif

I needed to write some code into a PRU inside a Beaglebone's ARM Cortex-A8 to check the GPIO pins and when a bit is set, to write the timestamp in a memory slow, then have the ARM processor have a process thats waiting for that value to be set to get the time of the action. I was doing this in hopes to get ~5ns worth of precision from the device. I had already done this in C++ no problem, but doing this in assembly when you need to know the registers for everything and how to pass from one thing to another... was a headache I didnt want to deal with. I found some other problems with the device we were using so i never ended up having to do that.

Learning assembly doesnt teach you anything about OOP, recursion, types... so what do you get from it? What knowledge can you take from Assembly and use for any other language?

When I was trying to get these 2 radios to connect to each other, it was trial and error that made me realize that there was a pipe address that needed to match on both devices. I dont exactly know what it does, but i know it needed to be done in order to get those things to work. Granted, I could have spent days reading more and more about the devices to finally realize that small detail instead of trail and error, but that would have been a lot slower. I dont know what the pipe address actually does because it does not matter. I think it is like a key or something... perhaps acts as a filter for the radio maybe. I had 100 other things that needed to be done, and that was not important.
Quote:
Originally Posted by lloyd mcclendon View Post

Sure, some really great JS devs out there don't know a lick of assembly and that's fair. (JS is a whole different discussion - the easiest programming language to use, the hardest one to truly understand. What's that quote, the easiest language everyone knows how to misuse .. something like that).
Probably the best explanation of Javascript i have ever heard. Every time I think i know what I am doing, I learn something new and realize how bad of a developer I was before.
Quote:
Originally Posted by lloyd mcclendon View Post

Anyway, what x86 helped me understand was what the processor had to do when I wrote some high level code. Hmm that's going to require a lot more machine code than this. That was my point above. Knowing assembly is very far from a practical thing to use for a lot of devs absolutely, but it's the underlying mindset and concept to always keep in mind as you write code that was quite helpful in my experience.

I fully agree, but it is the concepts not the code that actually matters.

Learning assembly doesnt teach you anything about OOP, recursion, types... so what do you get from it? If you can understand what is happening from trial and error, you are learning which solves your problem. The thing to be weary of is best practices. In c++ you can use a bunch of GoTo's to write your code.... it will work... but its just bad practice. Over time you will fix those bad habits.

Some people (like me) can't pull themselves to read a book and follow a lesson plan because its too slow. I look , how you define a value, i see that its typed, so what are the types? I write a quick sample and the compile crashes.. Ohh Int's cant be null (Lesson learned). I need to write a function, k, how do i pass a variable in, how do i return a variable... ohhh, I cant return an array, but i can return and object with an array. Can I add to this array, or does it need to be a list or something? Is that thread safe? Some stuff you google, some stuff you trial and error. That's how i learn, but most people I know who are learning prefer the book way. Id rather make a game and figure stuff out along the way refactoring every time i learn something new.
Zev's Comp
(15 items)
 
  
CPUMotherboardGraphicsRAM
Intel Core i5-2500K Sandy Bridge 3.3GHz GIGABYTE GA-Z68X-UD3H-B3 LGA 1155 Intel Z68 HDM... GeForce GTX 750 Ti G.SKILL Ripjaws X Series 8GB 
Hard DriveHard DriveHard DrivePower
1TB HDD 64GB SSD (Used for SRT) 500 GB. Antec BP550 Plus 550W Continuous Power ATX12V V... 
Case
COOLER MASTER ELITE 335 RC-335-KKN1-GP Black S... 
  hide details  
Reply
Zev's Comp
(15 items)
 
  
CPUMotherboardGraphicsRAM
Intel Core i5-2500K Sandy Bridge 3.3GHz GIGABYTE GA-Z68X-UD3H-B3 LGA 1155 Intel Z68 HDM... GeForce GTX 750 Ti G.SKILL Ripjaws X Series 8GB 
Hard DriveHard DriveHard DrivePower
1TB HDD 64GB SSD (Used for SRT) 500 GB. Antec BP550 Plus 550W Continuous Power ATX12V V... 
Case
COOLER MASTER ELITE 335 RC-335-KKN1-GP Black S... 
  hide details  
Reply
post #28 of 32
Since you even admitted above that you have not (you even said COULD NOT...) learn assembly, how can you say that learning assembly teaches you nothing about recursion and OOP? Or whatever you listed. You're out of your element. If you have learned it you'd be qualified to speak on the subject, but since you admittedly haven't the brain power, how can you say you know what the experience yields or does not yield. rolleyes.gif

I haven't learned how to bake a cake but you don't see me running around saying learning how to bake a cake will or will not teach you to cook a steak. I don't know the first damn thing about it.
stable again
(25 items)
 
  
CPUCPUMotherboardGraphics
E5-2687W E5-2687W ASUS Z9PED8-WS EVGA GTX 570 (Linux host) 
GraphicsRAMHard DriveHard Drive
EVGA GTX 970 FTW (win7 guest) 64GB G.SKILL 2133 2x Crucial M4 256GB raid1 4x 3TB raid 10 
CoolingCoolingCoolingCooling
2x Apogee HD  2x RX 480 2x MCP 655 RP-452x2 rev2 (new) 
CoolingCoolingOSOS
16x Cougar Turbine CFT12SB4 (new) EK FC 580 Gentoo (host) Gentoo (x23 guests) 
OSMonitorMonitorPower
windows 7 (guest w/ vfio-pci) Viewsonic 23" 1080P Viewsonic 19" Antec HCP Platinum 1000 (new) 
CaseOtherOther
Case Labs TH10 (still the best ever) 2x Lamptron FC-5 IOGEAR 2 way DVI KVM Switch 
  hide details  
Reply
stable again
(25 items)
 
  
CPUCPUMotherboardGraphics
E5-2687W E5-2687W ASUS Z9PED8-WS EVGA GTX 570 (Linux host) 
GraphicsRAMHard DriveHard Drive
EVGA GTX 970 FTW (win7 guest) 64GB G.SKILL 2133 2x Crucial M4 256GB raid1 4x 3TB raid 10 
CoolingCoolingCoolingCooling
2x Apogee HD  2x RX 480 2x MCP 655 RP-452x2 rev2 (new) 
CoolingCoolingOSOS
16x Cougar Turbine CFT12SB4 (new) EK FC 580 Gentoo (host) Gentoo (x23 guests) 
OSMonitorMonitorPower
windows 7 (guest w/ vfio-pci) Viewsonic 23" 1080P Viewsonic 19" Antec HCP Platinum 1000 (new) 
CaseOtherOther
Case Labs TH10 (still the best ever) 2x Lamptron FC-5 IOGEAR 2 way DVI KVM Switch 
  hide details  
Reply
post #29 of 32
Thread Starter 
Quote:
Originally Posted by lloyd mcclendon View Post

Since you even admitted above that you have not (you even said COULD NOT...) learn assembly, how can you say that learning assembly teaches you nothing about recursion and OOP? Or whatever you listed. You're out of your element. If you have learned it you'd be qualified to speak on the subject, but since you admittedly haven't the brain power, how can you say you know what the experience yields or does not yield. rolleyes.gif

I haven't learned how to bake a cake but you don't see me running around saying learning how to bake a cake will or will not teach you to cook a steak. I don't know the first damn thing about it.

I read up a bit on it back then, the basics were simple and straight forward. The complexity that deterred me from using it, was how it interfaced with the GPIO pins and the CPU Memory, as well as doing something simple like asking the system for the time. Granted, if i learned how to do that, I would have a much deeper understanding of stuff, but still not much gained. I can bake a regular cake sure, i understand what a cake is, but it's not like I can cooking a Baked Alaska. If I were to dive deeper, I would have learned about the memory locations for a bunch of stuff. At the same time, I had to do that for a PIC microcontroller using C. I had to do sleeps and understand how the internal timer bits worked to set the right hex value in the register so that after X cycles which should be my 20ms or whatever, and then the register would overflow and the send some data.

If I am wrong, and you feel that there was something important about learning Assembly, please let us know what it is. I can care less who is right or wrong , I just care that everyone knows what the RIGHT answer is. So telling me that I dont know what I am talking about provides nothing useful outside of attempting to degrade my credibility, please correct me if I am wrong I don't want to keep giving wrong\bad advice. If you give me a compelling argument, i might even try learning it again.
Zev's Comp
(15 items)
 
  
CPUMotherboardGraphicsRAM
Intel Core i5-2500K Sandy Bridge 3.3GHz GIGABYTE GA-Z68X-UD3H-B3 LGA 1155 Intel Z68 HDM... GeForce GTX 750 Ti G.SKILL Ripjaws X Series 8GB 
Hard DriveHard DriveHard DrivePower
1TB HDD 64GB SSD (Used for SRT) 500 GB. Antec BP550 Plus 550W Continuous Power ATX12V V... 
Case
COOLER MASTER ELITE 335 RC-335-KKN1-GP Black S... 
  hide details  
Reply
Zev's Comp
(15 items)
 
  
CPUMotherboardGraphicsRAM
Intel Core i5-2500K Sandy Bridge 3.3GHz GIGABYTE GA-Z68X-UD3H-B3 LGA 1155 Intel Z68 HDM... GeForce GTX 750 Ti G.SKILL Ripjaws X Series 8GB 
Hard DriveHard DriveHard DrivePower
1TB HDD 64GB SSD (Used for SRT) 500 GB. Antec BP550 Plus 550W Continuous Power ATX12V V... 
Case
COOLER MASTER ELITE 335 RC-335-KKN1-GP Black S... 
  hide details  
Reply
post #30 of 32
Although I have been steadily working as a .NET Application Developer for 2 years now, I still feel very newbish but I can offer a few additional pointers from my own limited experiences so far.

For those of you who are still in school, pay attention and dig deep. Be sure you have a solid understanding of what you are learning. I say this because there is just some things they can't teach in school. It was a big shock in my first real job as a developer where the world of source code and the size of the solutions I was working with was very overwhelming.

You will really learn how to debug when you go from a 10 file school lab solution with a few hundred lines of code at best, to a 20,000+ file solution with thousands of lines of code. You think you know enough, but then the reality sinks in that you only barely scratched the surface in school. If you are fortunate, your first job will pair you with a good mentor to help you adjust to the reality of development. My first one was a 3 month contract position. I was thrown in with no mentor no nothing. It was sink or swim time. Then my next contract position was much better where I had other developers to mentor me. I've been here ever since (hired on full time).

This is not meant to scare you. But the reality is much different than you may think when you are in school learning. Make sure you are up for the challenge, because challenge it will be and the rewards well worth it.
The Beast
(17 items)
 
  
CPUMotherboardGraphicsRAM
Phenom IIX4 965 AM3 Black Denab Edition Asus Crosshair IV Formula 890FX Republic of Gamers XFX Radeon HD 5830 PCI Express 2.1 x16 G.Skill Ripjaws 16 GB (4 x 4GB) 
Hard DriveHard DriveHard DriveOptical Drive
SAMSUNG 830 Series 2.5-Inch SATA III MLC Intern... SAMSUNG 830 Series 2.5-Inch SATA III MLC Intern... Western Digital 7200 RPM SATA II 1TB LiteOn DVD-+RW Dual Layer/Lightscribe* 
OSMonitorMonitorMonitor
Windows 10 Pro (64bit) ASUS VK278Q 27-Inch Full-HD 2ms LED Monitor wit... Samsung 216BW 21.6" LCD  Dell 17-inch Flat Screen Monitor 
KeyboardPowerCaseMouse
Razer BlackWidow Ultimate Mechanical Cooler Master Real Pro 750w Cooler Master HAF 932 High Air Flow ATX Full Tower Razor Mamba 
  hide details  
Reply
The Beast
(17 items)
 
  
CPUMotherboardGraphicsRAM
Phenom IIX4 965 AM3 Black Denab Edition Asus Crosshair IV Formula 890FX Republic of Gamers XFX Radeon HD 5830 PCI Express 2.1 x16 G.Skill Ripjaws 16 GB (4 x 4GB) 
Hard DriveHard DriveHard DriveOptical Drive
SAMSUNG 830 Series 2.5-Inch SATA III MLC Intern... SAMSUNG 830 Series 2.5-Inch SATA III MLC Intern... Western Digital 7200 RPM SATA II 1TB LiteOn DVD-+RW Dual Layer/Lightscribe* 
OSMonitorMonitorMonitor
Windows 10 Pro (64bit) ASUS VK278Q 27-Inch Full-HD 2ms LED Monitor wit... Samsung 216BW 21.6" LCD  Dell 17-inch Flat Screen Monitor 
KeyboardPowerCaseMouse
Razer BlackWidow Ultimate Mechanical Cooler Master Real Pro 750w Cooler Master HAF 932 High Air Flow ATX Full Tower Razor Mamba 
  hide details  
Reply
New Posts  All Forums:Forum Nav:
  Return Home
  Back to Forum: Coding and Programming
Overclock.net › Forums › Software, Programming and Coding › Coding and Programming › Words of Wisdom to new Developers.