Overclock.net › Forums › Industry News › Software News › [Wired] AVG can sell your browsing and search history to advertisers
New Posts  All Forums:Forum Nav:

[Wired] AVG can sell your browsing and search history to advertisers - Page 14

post #131 of 191
Quote:
Originally Posted by BeerPowered View Post

That's like saying you don't need car insurance if you as long as you drive carefully or you don't need health insurance because you never get sick.

All it takes in 1 time and you are screwed. Screwed much more than if you had the insurance in the first place. AV is the same way, it could have prevented the connection or blocked the dirty USB stick.

Stuff happens unexpectedly. Being careful is not good enough. You need AV just like you need Insurance. You may not ever see the need until it happens.

thumb.gifthumb.gif
post #132 of 191
Quote:
Originally Posted by BeerPowered View Post

That's like saying you don't need car insurance if you as long as you drive carefully or you don't need health insurance because you never get sick.

All it takes in 1 time and you are screwed. Screwed much more than if you had the insurance in the first place. AV is the same way, it could have prevented the connection or blocked the dirty USB stick.


Stuff happens unexpectedly. Being careful is not good enough. You need AV just like you need Insurance. You may not ever see the need until it happens.

pretty much unless mandated by law. aint paying those leaches more then i have to, rather throw that money else where that matters like a savings account.

these bunch of leaches welcomes your cash but you have to beat the crap out of them like pinata for them to give anything out. 99% of the time they find the next legal scapehole to jump out of their legal obligation.

..... well thats the way it works down this place......

i rather believe in myself and my own financial independence / control, if i get sick or at fault in an accident then i should be paying for it and not someone else and besides there is compulsory 3rd party insurance.

ether way regarding AV i dont believe in that crap. im just careful enough venturing only trusted sites and i've not gotten a virus in since win98 days. if im ever going down the darkweb into risky sites i've a sacrificial computer that is not networked and i can wipe as needed and thats the only machine that needs AV to scan drives before they are plugged into my clean computers
post #133 of 191
Quote:
Originally Posted by pnoozi View Post

It's not an idiotic move. You use an anti-virus because it makes you feel safe. There are many other folks out there who only want to use an anti-virus if it actually makes them safe, and more generally, only want to install and use a piece of software if it actually is useful. I can hardly call that idiotic.

It is indeed foolish, as has been said a billion times now, you are sacrificing a layer of security. Then you become completely dependant on human elements, which is next to useless from the increasing use of social engineering.

You would be shocked to learn how programmatically simple the majority of malware in the wild actually are.

You would be appalled to learn how easy it is for such malware to completely bypass the "human AV system".
Quote:
Originally Posted by pnoozi View Post

Considering that anti-virus programs (1) use resources, (2) are made by companies we have no particular reason to trust, and (3) introduce another possible layer of complication, conflict and potential troubleshooting on your PC, it is your job to convince everyone else that today's threat of malware is significant enough to warrant using them. The "burden of proof" so to speak is on you. In my opinion, I see an argument based mostly on assumptions, with few real-world examples to back it up. For example, malvertising. Demonstrate that your anti-virus of choice has protected you from an infected advertisement.

I have given an example already; do not attack me because you did not bother to read!
Quote:
Originally Posted by Colonel Gerdauf View Post

There are quite a number of cases where malware was injected into actual, legitimate web-pages. For example, a website I was working on for a small company has suffered from a DNS redirection scheme. There was nothing I could have done to stop the attack, as no notice was given, but I monitored the server for when the next attempt was being made. Also, there is the issue of stealth PUPs, where tricky malware gets installed along with all of your favourite programs. Whether it was posted as closed-source or open-source alone does not affect the potency of this issue.

The AV I am using, a mere basic MS Security Essentials/Defender, has saved me from the many cases where malware was stealth-injected into websites I frequent such as Blizzard and Oracle (of all places), it has saved me from several DNS redirection tricks where I have provided an example above, and it has saved my skin in downloading the seemingly innocent files in cases of download manages such as SourceForge.

Also, one thing you need to consider; why is it that every single person in IT and anybody that understands computer and electronic security demand that you put at least something for an AV? I talk to computer scientists, computer engineers and electrical engineers, all with at least a masters degree on their belt, and they all chuckle at the idea that you can use your wits in place of externally provided tools. Your wits are supposed to compliment the tools in use, not completely replace them. At this point, you are squabbling with the people who know what they are doing.

Also, about the AV software being malware/spyware, while that may be true in some cases, especially with freeware, that is a very broad generalization to make. There are a number of AV solutions out there that are not spyware nor nagware; again, I had already provided the examples.
Edited by Colonel Gerdauf - 9/21/15 at 8:19am
My PC
(14 items)
 
  
CPUMotherboardGraphicsRAM
Intel Core i5 6600K Gigabyte Z170MX-Gaming 5  Gigabyte GeForce GTX 1070 - G1 Gaming Corsair Vengeance LPX 
Hard DriveHard DriveCoolingOS
Samsung 850 Evo - 2.5" Seagate Desktop Swiftech H240-X Windows 10 Pro 
MonitorKeyboardPowerCase
Samsung S22D390H Gamdias HERMES Ultimate Seasonic 660W 80-Plus Platinum xp2 Corsair 350D 
MouseAudio
Logitech G502 Proteus Spectrum Beyerdynamic Custom One Pro Plus 
  hide details  
Reply
My PC
(14 items)
 
  
CPUMotherboardGraphicsRAM
Intel Core i5 6600K Gigabyte Z170MX-Gaming 5  Gigabyte GeForce GTX 1070 - G1 Gaming Corsair Vengeance LPX 
Hard DriveHard DriveCoolingOS
Samsung 850 Evo - 2.5" Seagate Desktop Swiftech H240-X Windows 10 Pro 
MonitorKeyboardPowerCase
Samsung S22D390H Gamdias HERMES Ultimate Seasonic 660W 80-Plus Platinum xp2 Corsair 350D 
MouseAudio
Logitech G502 Proteus Spectrum Beyerdynamic Custom One Pro Plus 
  hide details  
Reply
post #134 of 191
Quote:
Originally Posted by xenophobe View Post

[SNIP]

Yeah, guess we're just discussing semantics at this point. At least it doesn't seem that we disagree on much though. thumb.gif
pretty much my line of thinking also.

Quote:
Originally Posted by Fossil View Post

There is nothing "extremist" about stating the obvious. The second you plug that ethernet cord in or enable wireless to the internet, your PC is data mined. Your IP gives away literally everything. I'm not even sure why you're arguing with this, it is common sense. Just having a Windows OS ruins anything to do with privacy. Any major OS is well grounded these days. You think just because people are starting to actually realize what M$ is doing with W10 these days means your PC has been safe before hand? lol no

Also, paying cash while grocery shopping voids privacy concerns. But I shouldn't have to state the obvious...

common sense = MYTH.

no your ISP doesn't give away literally anything because they have hardly anything to give. since it's erroneous to make a sweeping generalization; mine (cox) requires a court order to release my name and physical address associated to my ip address; they do monitor what ip addresses and ports i connect to and keep a log of that activity for up to 6 months.

here read what is required for that:
http://www.scribd.com/doc/98463535/cox-spy

nothing in there about content on your PC.

have you at least called your isp and asked them? read the fine print in your contract? do they have the infrastructure, human resources and budget to handle all that data you're claiming they have?

let em guess - you saw a few click bait headlines and started making assumptions . . .tin foil brigade - FORWARD!


btw, have a store card to take advantage of those great sales? doesn't matter the form of payment; everytime you swipe it, a record of all the items on that transaction can be sold to a health insurance company so they can determine if your diet poses a "health risk" wink.gif

pretty obvious, huh?
loon 3.2
(18 items)
 
  
CPUMotherboardGraphicsRAM
i7-3770K Asus P8Z77-V Pro EVGA 980TI SC+ 16Gb PNY ddr3 1866 
Hard DriveHard DriveHard DriveOptical Drive
PNY 1311 240Gb 1 TB Seagate 3 TB WD Blue DVD DVDRW+/- 
CoolingCoolingOSMonitor
EKWB P280 kit EK-VGA supremacy Win X LG 24MC57HQ-P 
KeyboardPowerCaseMouse
Ducky Zero [blues] EVGA SuperNova 750 G2 Stryker M [hammered and drilled] corsair M65 
AudioAudio
SB Recon3D Klipsch ProMedia 2.1  
  hide details  
Reply
loon 3.2
(18 items)
 
  
CPUMotherboardGraphicsRAM
i7-3770K Asus P8Z77-V Pro EVGA 980TI SC+ 16Gb PNY ddr3 1866 
Hard DriveHard DriveHard DriveOptical Drive
PNY 1311 240Gb 1 TB Seagate 3 TB WD Blue DVD DVDRW+/- 
CoolingCoolingOSMonitor
EKWB P280 kit EK-VGA supremacy Win X LG 24MC57HQ-P 
KeyboardPowerCaseMouse
Ducky Zero [blues] EVGA SuperNova 750 G2 Stryker M [hammered and drilled] corsair M65 
AudioAudio
SB Recon3D Klipsch ProMedia 2.1  
  hide details  
Reply
post #135 of 191
Quote:
Originally Posted by looniam View Post

Warning: Spoiler! (Click to show)
pretty much my line of thinking also.
common sense = MYTH.

no your ISP doesn't give away literally anything because they have hardly anything to give. since it's erroneous to make a sweeping generalization; mine (cox) requires a court order to release my name and physical address associated to my ip address; they do monitor what ip addresses and ports i connect to and keep a log of that activity for up to 6 months.

here read what is required for that:
http://www.scribd.com/doc/98463535/cox-spy

nothing in there about content on your PC.

have you at least called your isp and asked them? read the fine print in your contract? do they have the infrastructure, human resources and budget to handle all that data you're claiming they have?

let em guess - you saw a few click bait headlines and started making assumptions . . .tin foil brigade - FORWARD!


btw, have a store card to take advantage of those great sales? doesn't matter the form of payment; everytime you swipe it, a record of all the items on that transaction can be sold to a health insurance company so they can determine if your diet poses a "health risk" wink.gif

pretty obvious, huh?

I really do not understand why you are so determined to fight against the core principles of networking.

Fossil is correct; internet connection is a two-way communication hub and you have absolutely no control of that factor. For what I classify as "petty criminals", you need at least a single layer of defence that is not reliant on human intuition, like I told the other guy. With that being said, you can put the most sophisticated defence system around your home, and the "spying" police will still get in by simply opening the front door.
My PC
(14 items)
 
  
CPUMotherboardGraphicsRAM
Intel Core i5 6600K Gigabyte Z170MX-Gaming 5  Gigabyte GeForce GTX 1070 - G1 Gaming Corsair Vengeance LPX 
Hard DriveHard DriveCoolingOS
Samsung 850 Evo - 2.5" Seagate Desktop Swiftech H240-X Windows 10 Pro 
MonitorKeyboardPowerCase
Samsung S22D390H Gamdias HERMES Ultimate Seasonic 660W 80-Plus Platinum xp2 Corsair 350D 
MouseAudio
Logitech G502 Proteus Spectrum Beyerdynamic Custom One Pro Plus 
  hide details  
Reply
My PC
(14 items)
 
  
CPUMotherboardGraphicsRAM
Intel Core i5 6600K Gigabyte Z170MX-Gaming 5  Gigabyte GeForce GTX 1070 - G1 Gaming Corsair Vengeance LPX 
Hard DriveHard DriveCoolingOS
Samsung 850 Evo - 2.5" Seagate Desktop Swiftech H240-X Windows 10 Pro 
MonitorKeyboardPowerCase
Samsung S22D390H Gamdias HERMES Ultimate Seasonic 660W 80-Plus Platinum xp2 Corsair 350D 
MouseAudio
Logitech G502 Proteus Spectrum Beyerdynamic Custom One Pro Plus 
  hide details  
Reply
post #136 of 191
What AVG does, the way things go and the way users don't care, is... natural... One can also read this very interesting , 1 year old report on what data antiviruses can send and do send and also indirectly, indicates that on authorities' demand, they can deliver you "special payload". Meaning, they can root your computer, through your antivirus and use it to own your PC and monitor you. And what better vessel to do that, than your antivirus itself... "Who guards the guardians?".

http://www.av-comparatives.org/wp-content/uploads/2014/04/avc_datasending_2014_en.pdf


Workaround to get rid of the ever more intrusive antiviruses, their adds, their registry tools and all the clutter they present as "features":

Use only an on demand scanner once every while. For the rest part, use anti-executables, sandboxes and such. Image your partition when clean. With a bit of experience, if you detect malware, restore a clean image. With few cases, it will wipe out everything, including any malware.

I have been without antivirus for many years now. Small list of "non antivirus" security programs:

- NoVirusThanks EXE Radar Pro
- Sandboxie
- VoodooShield
- AppGuard
- Zemana Antilogger
- Comodo Firewall with D+ enabled (serves as antiexecutable), at least versions 5.x and 6.x (haven't tried the newer ones).
- Shadow Defender
- Returnil
- Faronics antiexecutable
- Faronics DeepFreeze
- ToolWiz TimeFreeze
- Exewatch
- Secure Folders.

Useful On demand scanners:
- MBAM Free
- Emsisoft Emergency kit
- McAfee Stinger
- Hitman Pro (multiple engines).
(and many more if one does a little search).

Principles behind the functioning:

1) Antiexecutables: If it can't execute, it can't infect.
2) Virtualization: If it can't infect the real OS, upon reboot the malware is deleted together with the virtualized data.
3) Imaging: A clean image will always be malware free.

Problems:
1) Antiexecutables require non trigger happy users, basic knowledge of what's happening in Windows and above all, common sense.
2) Virtualization, when total, requires reboot before deleting everything and remember to save the stuff you want to preserve in the exluded folders or registry entries, otherwise is more dumb proof than antiexecutables.

Scanning "risky downloads" before instaling them, so one can avoid realtime antivirus:

- VirusTotal
https://www.virustotal.com/
- Anubis
https://anubis.iseclab.org/

^ A good combination of the above, allow you to have x1000 better security than running a resident antivirus and most security enthusiasts, either run without antivirus or at some point have ran without antivirus without ill effects, but return to antivirus due to a "security app syndrome", a sort of withdrawal reaction.

And you can wave their spyware, performance hit, adds, false positives, slowing down browsing http scanners, goodbye.
Edited by Undervolter - 9/21/15 at 9:43am
Main
(16 items)
 
Dedicated Encoder
(15 items)
 
 
CPUMotherboardGraphicsRAM
FX-8320@4Ghz Gigabyte 970 UD3P rev2.1 Gainward GTX 750Ti Corsair XMS3 1600Mhz 16GB (4x4GB) 
Hard DriveHard DriveOptical DriveOptical Drive
Crucial BX100 250GB Western Digital Green 2TB LiteOn Blu-Ray Burner IHBS 112-2 LG BH16NS55 Blu-Ray Burner 
CoolingOSMonitorKeyboard
Scythe Katana 3 Windows 7 Pro 64bit ASUS 22" VS228HR Microsoft Wired Keyboard 600 
PowerCaseMouseAudio
EVGA 430W Sharkoon VG4-V Logitech M90 Onboard 
CPUMotherboardGraphicsRAM
FX-8300 Asrock 970 Extreme3 HIS 6570 Silence Corsair XMS3 1600Mhz 8GB (2x4GB) CAS9 
Hard DriveHard DriveOptical DriveCooling
Plextor M6S 128GB Toshiba 2TB SATAIII LiteOn Blu Ray burner IHBS 112-2 Xigmatek Balder 
OSMonitorKeyboardPower
Windows 7 Pro 64bit Samsung S22B350H Microsoft Wired 600 Corsair VS350 
CaseMouseAudio
Lepa LPC 306 Logitech M90 Onboard 
  hide details  
Reply
Main
(16 items)
 
Dedicated Encoder
(15 items)
 
 
CPUMotherboardGraphicsRAM
FX-8320@4Ghz Gigabyte 970 UD3P rev2.1 Gainward GTX 750Ti Corsair XMS3 1600Mhz 16GB (4x4GB) 
Hard DriveHard DriveOptical DriveOptical Drive
Crucial BX100 250GB Western Digital Green 2TB LiteOn Blu-Ray Burner IHBS 112-2 LG BH16NS55 Blu-Ray Burner 
CoolingOSMonitorKeyboard
Scythe Katana 3 Windows 7 Pro 64bit ASUS 22" VS228HR Microsoft Wired Keyboard 600 
PowerCaseMouseAudio
EVGA 430W Sharkoon VG4-V Logitech M90 Onboard 
CPUMotherboardGraphicsRAM
FX-8300 Asrock 970 Extreme3 HIS 6570 Silence Corsair XMS3 1600Mhz 8GB (2x4GB) CAS9 
Hard DriveHard DriveOptical DriveCooling
Plextor M6S 128GB Toshiba 2TB SATAIII LiteOn Blu Ray burner IHBS 112-2 Xigmatek Balder 
OSMonitorKeyboardPower
Windows 7 Pro 64bit Samsung S22B350H Microsoft Wired 600 Corsair VS350 
CaseMouseAudio
Lepa LPC 306 Logitech M90 Onboard 
  hide details  
Reply
post #137 of 191
Quote:
Originally Posted by Colonel Gerdauf View Post

I really do not understand why you are so determined to fight against the core principles of networking.

Fossil is correct; internet connection is a two-way communication hub and you have absolutely no control of that factor. For what I classify as "petty criminals", you need at least a single layer of defence that is not reliant on human intuition, like I told the other guy. With that being said, you can put the most sophisticated defence system around your home, and the "spying" police will still get in by simply opening the front door.

maybe you need to re-read what i posted, there is nothing about core principles of networking nor anything about what CAN happen.

i am discussing what an ISP is ACTUALLY tracking and what data you have on your PC is NOT one of those as fossil stated:
Quote:
The second you plug that ethernet cord in or enable wireless to the internet, your PC is data mined. Your IP gives away literally everything.

funny thing is i have received a few DCMA notices that were passed along from my isp over the years and each time i asked if they could tell what device was conntected. the answer each time was:

NO

cheers.
loon 3.2
(18 items)
 
  
CPUMotherboardGraphicsRAM
i7-3770K Asus P8Z77-V Pro EVGA 980TI SC+ 16Gb PNY ddr3 1866 
Hard DriveHard DriveHard DriveOptical Drive
PNY 1311 240Gb 1 TB Seagate 3 TB WD Blue DVD DVDRW+/- 
CoolingCoolingOSMonitor
EKWB P280 kit EK-VGA supremacy Win X LG 24MC57HQ-P 
KeyboardPowerCaseMouse
Ducky Zero [blues] EVGA SuperNova 750 G2 Stryker M [hammered and drilled] corsair M65 
AudioAudio
SB Recon3D Klipsch ProMedia 2.1  
  hide details  
Reply
loon 3.2
(18 items)
 
  
CPUMotherboardGraphicsRAM
i7-3770K Asus P8Z77-V Pro EVGA 980TI SC+ 16Gb PNY ddr3 1866 
Hard DriveHard DriveHard DriveOptical Drive
PNY 1311 240Gb 1 TB Seagate 3 TB WD Blue DVD DVDRW+/- 
CoolingCoolingOSMonitor
EKWB P280 kit EK-VGA supremacy Win X LG 24MC57HQ-P 
KeyboardPowerCaseMouse
Ducky Zero [blues] EVGA SuperNova 750 G2 Stryker M [hammered and drilled] corsair M65 
AudioAudio
SB Recon3D Klipsch ProMedia 2.1  
  hide details  
Reply
post #138 of 191
It's all about defense in depth. Good cyber security comes in layers, and each successive layer should be able to step up if the previous layer fails.

Got good browsing habits? Good!
Got adblock/ghostery/noscript! Even better!
Got an actively-scanning AV program? Even better still!
All of the above, and you do all your browsing in a virtual machine? Fantastic!

There is also an element of security vs ease-of-use. Good browsing, adblock, and a scanning AV are very easy to use and all increase your security to some degree. There is virtually no downside. Browsing solely in a VM is totally feasible, but begins to infringe on ease-of-use.

I don't really understand the complaints about resource usage of AV programs. When do you use your AV? When browsing! I've never browsed hard enough that I missed that extra 5% CPU usage.

Frankly, gaming is the only thing I do that comes close to capping my CPU in a way that a few extra % of usage would be beneficial. Many AVs have a "gaming mode" which puts them on low usage in the background.

On topic, knowing this I will avoid AVG. I use Avira on my personal devices, but I will switch to Sophos Endpoint once I get my UTM up and running. The Endpoint AV ties into the UTM well and provides some nice features.
Edited by PsycoCarrot - 9/21/15 at 9:50am
post #139 of 191
Quote:
Originally Posted by PsycoCarrot View Post

It's all about defense in depth. Good cyber security comes in layers, and each successive layer should be able to step up if the previous layer fails.

Exactly.
Quote:
I don't really understand the complaints about resource usage of AV programs. When do you use your AV? When browsing! I've never browsed hard enough that I missed that extra 5% CPU usage.

Frankly, gaming is the only thing I do that comes close to capping my CPU in a way that a few extra % of usage would be beneficial. Many AVs have a "gaming mode" which puts them on low usage in the background.

On topic, knowing this I will avoid AVG. I use Avira on my personal devices, but I will switch to Sophos Endpoint once I get my UTM up and running. The Endpoint AV ties into the UTM.

You are right about CPU, although there are some particularly crappy engines that eat more than 5% CPU and every year antiviruses change and their performance hit is difference. ALL antiviruses introduce HDD lag and browsing lag, because they must first scan what you are about to open or browse. Most modern AVs, mitigate the HDD lag, by "remembering" in a database the already scanned files (although this also has a lag, the time to check the database). Browsing lag is inevitable, as the scanner must scan all page objects before you load them. Those with superb internet connection feel it less than those with worse connection.

Here performance tests :

http://www.av-comparatives.org/performance-tests/

There are also some antivirus engines, that introduce system lag, due to high i/o reads Usually second rate antiviruses do that, that don't "remember" what was scanned before.
Main
(16 items)
 
Dedicated Encoder
(15 items)
 
 
CPUMotherboardGraphicsRAM
FX-8320@4Ghz Gigabyte 970 UD3P rev2.1 Gainward GTX 750Ti Corsair XMS3 1600Mhz 16GB (4x4GB) 
Hard DriveHard DriveOptical DriveOptical Drive
Crucial BX100 250GB Western Digital Green 2TB LiteOn Blu-Ray Burner IHBS 112-2 LG BH16NS55 Blu-Ray Burner 
CoolingOSMonitorKeyboard
Scythe Katana 3 Windows 7 Pro 64bit ASUS 22" VS228HR Microsoft Wired Keyboard 600 
PowerCaseMouseAudio
EVGA 430W Sharkoon VG4-V Logitech M90 Onboard 
CPUMotherboardGraphicsRAM
FX-8300 Asrock 970 Extreme3 HIS 6570 Silence Corsair XMS3 1600Mhz 8GB (2x4GB) CAS9 
Hard DriveHard DriveOptical DriveCooling
Plextor M6S 128GB Toshiba 2TB SATAIII LiteOn Blu Ray burner IHBS 112-2 Xigmatek Balder 
OSMonitorKeyboardPower
Windows 7 Pro 64bit Samsung S22B350H Microsoft Wired 600 Corsair VS350 
CaseMouseAudio
Lepa LPC 306 Logitech M90 Onboard 
  hide details  
Reply
Main
(16 items)
 
Dedicated Encoder
(15 items)
 
 
CPUMotherboardGraphicsRAM
FX-8320@4Ghz Gigabyte 970 UD3P rev2.1 Gainward GTX 750Ti Corsair XMS3 1600Mhz 16GB (4x4GB) 
Hard DriveHard DriveOptical DriveOptical Drive
Crucial BX100 250GB Western Digital Green 2TB LiteOn Blu-Ray Burner IHBS 112-2 LG BH16NS55 Blu-Ray Burner 
CoolingOSMonitorKeyboard
Scythe Katana 3 Windows 7 Pro 64bit ASUS 22" VS228HR Microsoft Wired Keyboard 600 
PowerCaseMouseAudio
EVGA 430W Sharkoon VG4-V Logitech M90 Onboard 
CPUMotherboardGraphicsRAM
FX-8300 Asrock 970 Extreme3 HIS 6570 Silence Corsair XMS3 1600Mhz 8GB (2x4GB) CAS9 
Hard DriveHard DriveOptical DriveCooling
Plextor M6S 128GB Toshiba 2TB SATAIII LiteOn Blu Ray burner IHBS 112-2 Xigmatek Balder 
OSMonitorKeyboardPower
Windows 7 Pro 64bit Samsung S22B350H Microsoft Wired 600 Corsair VS350 
CaseMouseAudio
Lepa LPC 306 Logitech M90 Onboard 
  hide details  
Reply
post #140 of 191
Quote:
Originally Posted by Stuuut View Post

Quote:
Originally Posted by twerk View Post

Avira is still king. I stopped using AVG over 5 years ago.

https://www.av-test.org/

Does Avira still do the million popups thing? The AV is really good but thoes popups killed it for me.

You can use this little program to stop the pop-ups. http://bgpkiller.weebly.com/

If Avira Free didn't have those popups it would be about perfect..
New Posts  All Forums:Forum Nav:
  Return Home
  Back to Forum: Software News
Overclock.net › Forums › Industry News › Software News › [Wired] AVG can sell your browsing and search history to advertisers