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post #1 of 14
Thread Starter 
Hello! Please help me, I need your opinion. I finished school this year and want to enter university. In my university there are only 2 specializations: CE and SE. I want to study software and hardware equally, and I'm studying PHP and C++ by myself now, willing to work with web in the future. I was told that having a CE degree I can work both in software and hardware engineering fields, but having SE degree I can work only with software. But I don't know, I want firstly to work with PHP and C++ and then later maybe a hardware engineer. What to choose? Who knows? Is CE more general specialization? If I have a SE degree can I work as a hardware engineer? If I have a CE can I work as a software engineer? Or it doesn't matter. Both degees are equal.
post #2 of 14
Why do you have to decide right now?

Computer Engineering, at my university, shares 85% of the same courses as Computer Science. For your first two and a half year your courses for either major will probably be the exact same. When you are in your junior and senior years, take a few CE and SE courses and see how it feels. By that time you should be able to better appreciate the differences between the two.

Based on your interest in C++ and PHP I would say you are closer to software than hardware. Computer Engineers are well equipped to program robots and to work on low level firmware and hardware drivers. The main difference between the two is in a computer engineering degree you focus a lot more on low level hardware instructions, bit operations, and lower level aspects of security. If you are interested in building website and big software, computer science will probably better equip you for that, because you will spend more time on object oriented approaches and design patterns.

Again though, you don't need to decide right now. Get into the course load and see what interests you. At the end of your four years you maybe an art history major, you just don't know wink.gif.
post #3 of 14
Thread Starter 
Thank you for your reply. It would be nice if I could switch between these two specializations in senior years, but I was told that it is impossible to do at the university. So it is very important for me to choose it now. My only fear is if I get a diploma in CE and I feel that I want to work in software engineering field employers will doubt in my degree. There is no opportunity to get a CS degree for me. If it existed I wouldn't even ask. But I have to decide between CE and SE. I don't know how emplyers react if I say that I have a degree in CE. How do they consider degree in CE? Because I can study C++ by myself on Internet and take programming classes, but I will not be able to change my degree. I want to be sure when employer ask if I have a degree in CS or related field and I say that I have a degree in CE I will not be rejected. Is CE a related field in this case?
post #4 of 14
If you are studying in a public university in the US you can change major any time you want. If you ares studying outside the US I can't say.
post #5 of 14
Thread Starter 
Recently I was told that SE is CS. Is it true? So maybe it's better to go to SE instead of CE. What do you think? Is a degree in SE you will consider as CS? Which degree is more perspective?
post #6 of 14
Quote:
Originally Posted by mothergoose729 View Post

Why do you have to decide right now?

Computer Engineering, at my university, shares 85% of the same courses as Computer Science. For your first two and a half year your courses for either major will probably be the exact same. When you are in your junior and senior years, take a few CE and SE courses and see how it feels. By that time you should be able to better appreciate the differences between the two.

Based on your interest in C++ and PHP I would say you are closer to software than hardware. Computer Engineers are well equipped to program robots and to work on low level firmware and hardware drivers. The main difference between the two is in a computer engineering degree you focus a lot more on low level hardware instructions, bit operations, and lower level aspects of security. If you are interested in building website and big software, computer science will probably better equip you for that, because you will spend more time on object oriented approaches and design patterns.

Again though, you don't need to decide right now. Get into the course load and see what interests you. At the end of your four years you maybe an art history major, you just don't know wink.gif.

I think you're missing a big point.... Computer Engineer includes elements of Electrical Engineering. This is not covered in SE or CS at all.

You have to learn circuit design and the mathematics of electrical elements (transistors, resistors, capacitors, inductors, diodes, opamps, etc). CE also have to learn signal processing (Fourier Transformations) which I do not believe is covered in SE or CS either.

Where I went, EE-side started freshman year with software-side.
Quote:
Originally Posted by mothergoose729 View Post

If you are studying in a public university in the US you can change major any time you want. If you ares studying outside the US I can't say.
But you have to be careful about course requirements.....

My college had a required sequence of certain engineering courses and they were offered only once per year.

Quote:
Originally Posted by cherry890 View Post

Recently I was told that SE is CS. Is it true? So maybe it's better to go to SE instead of CE. What do you think? Is a degree in SE you will consider as CS? Which degree is more perspective?
Honestly, I don't think it matters much..... a senior out of college actually know very little useful knowledge for a job! wink.gif

(I'll actually be taking resumes this week at a college job fair.)

If you like some hardware but don't want to learn circuit design, CS is good for you:

Edited by DuckieHo - 9/29/15 at 12:25am
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post #7 of 14
Thread Starter 
Quote:
Originally Posted by DuckieHo View Post

I think you're missing a big point.... Computer Engineer includes elements of Electrical Engineering. This is not covered in SE or CS at all.

You have to learn circuit design and the mathematics of electrical elements (transistors, resistors, capacitors, inductors, diodes, opamps, etc). CE also have to learn signal processing (Fourier Transformations) which I do not believe is covered in SE or CS either.

Where I went, EE-side started freshman year with software-side.

And what do you mean by that? Please tell me more. I am also worried about employers. Will they want to hire me if I will apply for a C++ junior position? They require degree in CS or equivalent.
post #8 of 14
Quote:
Originally Posted by cherry890 View Post

And what do you mean by that? Please tell me more. I am also worried about employers. Will they want to hire me if I will apply for a C++ junior position? They require degree in CS or equivalent.
Basically.... even if you graduate in the top 10% of your class, you know next to nothing about C++ programming that is useful for a real-world job. College just proves that you can learn though. You will pick up more programming and development experience in the first 6 months at a job than your entire college career... plus they pay you.

A senior in CS/SE/CE are all about the same in the view of a potential employer. They will all get you the same interview. It's what you can show them from learning is what will get you a job.

Also.... communication and soft skills is critical.... do not overlook this aspect (unless you're a master level programmer, then people can overlook social ineptitude).
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post #9 of 14
Thread Starter 
I study not in the USA. So here only 2 specializations I can choose: CE or SE. But I would like that the diploma be equivalent to CS. So which one do you recommend? I saw recently two vacancies for C++ junior. The company wants a person who knows C++ very well, but also requires a degree in CS, so if I have a diploma in CE can I apply for it?
post #10 of 14
Quote:
Originally Posted by DuckieHo View Post

I think you're missing a big point.... Computer Engineer includes elements of Electrical Engineering. This is not covered in SE or CS at all.

You have to learn circuit design and the mathematics of electrical elements (transistors, resistors, capacitors, inductors, diodes, opamps, etc). CE also have to learn signal processing (Fourier Transformations) which I do not believe is covered in SE or CS either.

Where I went, EE-side started freshman year with software-side.
But you have to be careful about course requirements.....

My college had a required sequence of certain engineering courses and they were offered only once per year.
Honestly, I don't think it matters much..... a senior out of college actually know very little useful knowledge for a job! wink.gif

(I'll actually be taking resumes this week at a college job fair.)

If you like some hardware but don't want to learn circuit design, CS is good for you:

I think it depends on the university. At my school computer science and computer engineering overlap a lot, and the distinction between EEE and circuit design and no EEE and circuit design is not so clear cut.

In either event, best to check your course catalog and to speak with a major adviser.
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