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Does this count as a SFF system?

post #1 of 3
Thread Starter 
So I bought a new gun safe recently, with a pretty decent fire rating (yeah, lots of arguments about residential security containers and their fire ratings, but it's better than something setting on my wooden desk). Anyway, I wanted to put some sort of SFF system in there with USB external drives to backup data from my primary storage server. The data going into the safe would be a third copy of a subset of data; primarily my user data.

To see more of my safe, and the custom lights I installed, check out this album -- http://imgur.com/a/UUMst

After looking at many different options, including prebuilt NAS systems, I ended up going with a SBC (Single Board Computer). Instead of the infamous Raspberry Pi, I decided to use the ODroid-XU4. Specs on this little thing are awesome:

Samsung Exynos5422 Cortex-A15 and Cortex-A7 Octa-core CPU
2GB RAM
8GB eMMC
2 x USB 3.0, 1 x USB 2.0
Gigabit ethernet
HDMI

and the size of the enclosure is approximately 3.5" x 2.5" x 1"! It also has a cooling fan on the chip that powers on when needed.

I've been running this board for about a week, and just today I mounted it inside my safe.

Why did I choose this over any of the other SBC? Well, 2GB of RAM is nice, USB 3.0 is nice, but the big point was Gigabit Ethernet.


On this board I'm running a modified version of the CubieTruck CentOS 7.1 build, but using the kernel compiled by HardKernel from their Ubuntu image. For packages, I'm using the Fedora 19 ARM repo and it's been working great so far.


So I guess you want photos now? Okay.

Parts as they came to me (once I opened the packages - board, case, UTC battery, power adapter, and a serial USB adapter)


Closeup of the board


One side of the board (GbE, USB 2.0, power, microSD, HDMI -- there is a eMMC slot on the bottom side of the board where the mSD goes, and a selector switch to choose mSD or eMMC as the boot; I'm using eMMC since it's much faster)


Other side of the board (GPIO panel, power button, 2 x USB 3.0)


Completed case with a pocket knife for reference -- this was with testing a 16GB UHS-1 mSD card


Alternate view


Other side


Mounted in safe with power and ethernet plugged in -- used velcro to attach to the back of the safe on the bottom shelf


Close up


640GB USB 2.0 external hard drive -- Only one I have on hand currently, but will be buying a pair of 2TB USB 3.0 drives to mirror


Finished view (for now) -- Once I get new external drives, I'll get short cables and velcro them to the back as well to leave that shelf free for...stuff




Overall, very happy with it. Using nload I was seeing up to 122MB/s transfers, which means this board can push full Gb speeds. 99.9% of the time, the board will sit idle. at 2:43am I have a cron job on my storage box to do an rsync of specific directories (currently only user directories). For the time being I've unplugged my dehumidifier rod to see if this board will achieve the same thing or not. Over the past hour, the temperature inside the safe as stayed constant at 75.7 degrees, and the humidity dropped 1% to 56%. I'll be monitoring the rest of today, and tomorrow to really have an idea how it looks. FYI, temperature outside the safe (in my office) is 75.3 degrees, and humidity is 44%.
Edited by tycoonbob - 10/5/15 at 11:17am
post #2 of 3
Those Odroids are pretty awesome! I like the magazine they make showcasing their devices and ways to use them. Given the large volume of the safe, I seriously doubt it would have a temperature problem. So many new devices keep coming out that it has been hard to decide. So far I have stuck mostly with lower powered x86/64 devices, but more and more ARM boards with better specs are really starting to make waves. Good luck with your little rig!
post #3 of 3
Thread Starter 
Quote:
Originally Posted by Kleer Kut View Post

Those Odroids are pretty awesome! I like the magazine they make showcasing their devices and ways to use them. Given the large volume of the safe, I seriously doubt it would have a temperature problem. So many new devices keep coming out that it has been hard to decide. So far I have stuck mostly with lower powered x86/64 devices, but more and more ARM boards with better specs are really starting to make waves. Good luck with your little rig!

Yes, this little thing is sweet! I initially wanted a SFF x86 system, but just couldn't find something that I liked that was anything near this small.


I've been monitoring the temperature inside the safe since I installed this, and it's been variable between 74.1 and 75.7, and seems to fluctuate with the temperature in my office. Humidity has dropped inside the safe, from 57% to 55%, which is a good thing.
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