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Low-commitment Linux jobs?

post #1 of 7
Thread Starter 
I do some programming but I'm not interested in working professionally on Windows environments and prefer Linux, FOSS, and a DevOps-style problem-solving than purely just writing code. I've looked at a few Linux jobs covering C++ programming, sysadmin and DevOps. Most of the suitable C++ jobs I've seen require some ancillary knowledge, the sysadmin jobs all seem to be about "run our container fleet", and DevOps jobs seem the most fitting for my skills but it also sounds like a lot of work to constantly be staying on top of all the latest middleware just to be considered competent. The problem for me seems to be looking at jobs in the software industry. All of these jobs look to me like just being paid to do things a certain way rather than to genuinely solve problems. I don't want to spend 60 hours a week fixing bugs, because there are too many other things I would much rather do with my life. So what I would like to know is: what kind of jobs in other industries exist that would allow me to use and improve my IT skills but don't demand a huge commitment of time and energy? Boring work is fine, I have some AS/400 experience.
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post #2 of 7
Quote:
Originally Posted by Petrol View Post

All of these jobs look to me like just being paid to do things a certain way rather than to genuinely solve problems

They are. Most places you go to work will expect you to do things their way, no ands, if, or buts about it.

Quote:
Originally Posted by Petrol View Post

I don't want to spend 60 hours a week fixing bugs, because there are too many other things I would much rather do with my life.

Don't work in programming then.

Writing code and problem solving is the easy stuff, fixing the bugs is where the bulk of the work is really at.

For example, I wrote my Window Managers ~3000 lines of code within a week... however I have been fixing bugs in it for over 8 months, one after another, fix one open up another... add more features which in turn adds more bugs... thus is life.
post #3 of 7
Thread Starter 
don't get me wrong, I fully appreciate the value of debugging and don't mind doing it for my own work but I don't want to risk getting stuck in a rut where all I'm doing day in day out is fixing bugs created by other programmers. Most of the people I know in IT seem to be stuck in some kind of assembly-line fashion programming where they're just working on cogs of code for the greater machine. I guess what I'm trying to say is it would be nice to work somewhere IT is needed but only a small team, so there's more latitude to try new things without feeling micromanaged. In other words, I would like to work for SME rather than a larger corporation but I'm not sure where to look to find those jobs. I had a friend who worked at an auto-parts factory, mainly with RDBMS and C and it sounded great to me. His compensation wasn't "software engineering"-tier but it was low-commitment work that he could step away from at 5pm every day and he had the freedom to develop some innovative pieces of middleware that improved the business.

Oh, I asked him how he found that job and he said it was luck. I expect it is, but I would still appreciate any tips to help improve my chances thumb.gif
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post #4 of 7
Take a look at state or local government jobs. Sounds similar to what I do, however I'm more on the dev side of things. Our server engineers have a similar role, but they're more focused on the deployment side of things and do a bit of development.
post #5 of 7
bountysource.com was something that came to mind. You might be able to find a project or team that has work at a pace more palatable to you. Something like this could give you a chance to 'test the waters' and perhaps find a more long term solution. Or at least find some like minded people that can share their experiences.
post #6 of 7
Thread Starter 
Hey bountysource looks awesome! Thanks for the suggestions, I was thinking of local gov't jobs but wasn't sure how to find them, I'll give it another go smile.gif
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post #7 of 7
Linux/Unix is where it's at. Some companies have even tested Linux as the next desktop. WIndows is desktop only where I work, nothing important runs on Windows. They leave those to the big boys. We've already transitioned many Windows applications to Unix based servers. We started this 4 years ago. The only Windows servers left will be domain servers at this rate. Windows has no future in my opinion. Even Android is Linux (Unix) based.

It's a small leap from Linux to Unix (AIX,Solaris). I got into it from the 'network' side off IT back when ..... a long time ago smile.gif

My group tests, implements and engineers monitoring solutions. The keyword is monitoring. We use products like IBM Tivoli (NetCool). These products are mainly AIX based and are used to monitor ALL operating systems which makes it fun. We use Rex, Pearl, shell, Expect, etc... for coding (I call it scripting). There isn't much we don't get to do. Most of us come via the sysadmin route or worked in operations. You sound more like a sysadmin (or similar).

I was lucky enough to skip any operations or sysadmin job as I learned NetView/OpenView back in the day and enjoyed it enough to leave network engineering permanently.

The pay is outstanding, no mystery there.

I wrote this because you said " freedom to develop some innovative pieces of middleware that improved the business" and we get to do that a lot. It amazes me what departments ask for and we try and make it happen.
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