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Insulating water pipes and CPU

post #1 of 8
Thread Starter 
Hey guys first post sorry if its in the wrong section,
But basically im looking at insulating my water set up to eventually run antifreeze at a chilled temprature.
is it possible to create condtions in a computer case by having only exit fans and fully sealing your case with silicone?

or would it be easier to use insulation tape for the pipes and plasti dip for the back of the mobo for example?

or is putty the only real way

thanks Rob
post #2 of 8
Exhaust fans only in a sealed case? That does not sound right. What are you trying to achieve with that?
post #3 of 8
Thread Starter 
So there is no air in the case to cause condensation ,
Essentially making a really poor vacuum environment
post #4 of 8
You'll only get stale air, not vacuum.
post #5 of 8
Quote:
Originally Posted by robfpvgt View Post

So there is no air in the case to cause condensation ,
Essentially making a really poor vacuum environment

If you don't hit the condensation point there won't be any. If you do get low enough, a fan blowing directly on the board where it is cold will prevent moisture formation.
With decreasing temperature, glycol viscosity increases and it is very demanding on the pump.
40% mix at -17 has a viscosity of 15. Water has a viscosity of ~1.7 at 0C.
So it would be 7.8 times more demanding for a pump to push a 40% glycol mix at -17C. Good luck on that.

The only way would be the reduce density with surfactant thus decreasing the viscosity but then, would the mix be any better than chilled water? Considering the flow is also important to cool off (and calorific capacity).
Edited by Just a nickname - 10/29/15 at 12:23pm
My System
(15 items)
 
  
CPUMotherboardGraphicsRAM
i7-4790k MSI Z97 Gaming 5 Sapphire R9 290X Tri-X 2x8gb ADATA 2133MHz CL10 
Hard DriveCoolingOSKeyboard
Mushkin 1 TB SSD & Samsung F3 spinpoint 1 TB MCP655A + 2 x MCP320 + EK supreme copper Win10 Corsair K70 Lux 
PowerCaseMouse
Corsair 750W Bitphenix Monstrous water cooling case Logitech G9X 
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My System
(15 items)
 
  
CPUMotherboardGraphicsRAM
i7-4790k MSI Z97 Gaming 5 Sapphire R9 290X Tri-X 2x8gb ADATA 2133MHz CL10 
Hard DriveCoolingOSKeyboard
Mushkin 1 TB SSD & Samsung F3 spinpoint 1 TB MCP655A + 2 x MCP320 + EK supreme copper Win10 Corsair K70 Lux 
PowerCaseMouse
Corsair 750W Bitphenix Monstrous water cooling case Logitech G9X 
  hide details  
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post #6 of 8
Yeah, I'd say you posted this in the wrong section.

We're talking about sub-ambient cooling here.
You'd get far more responses on the Specialized Cooling - Peltier subsection.
post #7 of 8
yes, hope a mod moves it.

And for your info.. creating a vacuum is extremely difficult AND dangerous... its not done with a fan.. but with a special pump.

Far easier to create a "chillbox" to tackle the condensation issue
post #8 of 8
If anything you would probably want more airflow, not a poor vacuum. PC fans aren't even remotely close to strong enough to do that anyway, just end up with stale air and heat building up from parts like your HDD, PSU, etc. etc. Airflow promotes evaporation, stale air lets it build up. That's why when you are all sweaty on a hot summer day that gust of wind feel so cool and why it always seems to feel muggy outside on days with no breeze.

A good de-humidifier in your PC room with lots of circulating air inside your case and house in general will help out the most. Still need to properly insulate motherboard and such with stuff like liquid eraser and I believe vasoline, but the guys over in the sub zero forum section will be able to help you in that department way better than me.
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