Overclock.net › Forums › Software, Programming and Coding › Operating Systems › Linux, Unix › I want to try linux on a spare hard drive...help?
New Posts  All Forums:Forum Nav:

I want to try linux on a spare hard drive...help? - Page 2

post #11 of 18
I think it is important to understand a basic difference between some distros. Some are rather strictly "Live" which is to say that they are not expected to be installed as a permanent fixture. They can boot on anything and will discover hardware and apply appropriate drivers and any with issues can be overridden or tweaked at boot time. Some that are transitional can use some very small bit of harddrive space for persistence so that personal preferences or hardware specifics are consulted and applied on that specific machine.

Then there are the regular distros that hope you will install to harddrive but recognize that people like "a taste" first and so provide a live (though sometimes minimal) environment requiring no commitment until and unless you select "Install". Most of these just require burning the iso to a CD/DVD. These also will run from USB sticks but require an extra step or two always completely explained in the documentation. People have their favorite 3rd party bootable programs but these days most well-known distros have those built right in.

Take a 1 minute look here and see what I mean Bootable Ubuntu Stick . It has become ridiculously easy.

Regarding jumping into the deep end I do not recommend Gentoo for most beginners. The simplest job will require considerable research and preparation. Granted that will teach you deep basics but it may take days just to get a working system you can even get started on. If you want a deeper end than Mint or Ubuntu I'd suggest Arch or Slackware. There is so much more and better documentation that any research is quick and easy. In the case of Arch it may well be the most popular distro here on OCN so lots of help exists in a place you already visit. Probably the biggest difference between these two beyond some underlying fundamentals i that Arch is a Bleeding Edge Rolling Release utilizing but also needing regular updates. Slackware, OTOH, is quite a bit more conservative preferring a tried and true track record that does not assume that "new" always equals "improved". Once setup it requires extremely little maintenance and "just works". It is the oldest surviving distrro so adheres to vanilla Linux ways more than any other.

Ther cool thing is you don't have to choose yet. You can try all Live and most Hard distros before you commit. Have some fun. Try a few.
NewMain
(16 items)
 
  
CPUMotherboardGraphicsRAM
Intel i5 - 3550 Asrock Z77 Extreme4 Evga GTX 1070Ti  4x2GB Corsair Vengeance 
Hard DriveOptical DriveCoolingOS
Seagate SATA 2TB x 2  Plextor PX-891SAW CM-Hyper N520 Slackware 14.2 MultiLib, Slackware 14.0 32 bit,... 
MonitorKeyboardPowerCase
32" Vizio HDTV + DLP Logitech Wireless Corsair HX-850 Antec Sonata I 
MouseMouse PadAudioOther
Razer DeathAdder 2013 dual ESI Juli@ CoolGear ExtSata Enclosure w/ Optical and 3TB S... 
  hide details  
Reply
NewMain
(16 items)
 
  
CPUMotherboardGraphicsRAM
Intel i5 - 3550 Asrock Z77 Extreme4 Evga GTX 1070Ti  4x2GB Corsair Vengeance 
Hard DriveOptical DriveCoolingOS
Seagate SATA 2TB x 2  Plextor PX-891SAW CM-Hyper N520 Slackware 14.2 MultiLib, Slackware 14.0 32 bit,... 
MonitorKeyboardPowerCase
32" Vizio HDTV + DLP Logitech Wireless Corsair HX-850 Antec Sonata I 
MouseMouse PadAudioOther
Razer DeathAdder 2013 dual ESI Juli@ CoolGear ExtSata Enclosure w/ Optical and 3TB S... 
  hide details  
Reply
post #12 of 18
Quote:
Originally Posted by Depauville Kid View Post

The "Deep End" philosophy is one way of teaching/learning. Also consider that the difficulty could be such a turn off that it leads to frustration.

Another philosophy is to relate something new to something familiar by building on prior knowledge. As you learn, continue adding new ideas and new challenges.

I get what you're saying, but I've tried a couple of distros that were fairly similar to Windows, but I seemed to find myself trying to "blend" my Windows knowledge into what I was learning about Linux. So for me personally, the "deep end" approach might be the thing that clearly separates the 2 OS's for me. biggrin.gif
post #13 of 18
Quote:
Originally Posted by enorbet2 View Post

Probably the biggest difference between these two beyond some underlying fundamentals i that Arch is a Bleeding Edge Rolling Release utilizing but also needing regular updates.

*Cutting Edge

Bleeding Edge = Experimental, beta, whatever you wish to call it, from upstream.
Cutting Edge = Stable releases from upstream.

It doesn't need regular updates either. While staying up to date is a big benefit of a rolling release style, you can hold back updates near indefinitely if you so wish to. In my case I have Arch machines that haven't been updated in a year to nearly 2 years. Updated one recently that hadn't been updated about a year and had no issues whatsoever.
Edited by Shrak - 10/31/15 at 9:33pm
post #14 of 18
I am a Linux noob and jumped straight into Arch... Been running Arch for about 6 weeks now and couldn't be happier. But if command line seems daunting maybe tinker with Mint or Ubuntu until you are more comfortable.
post #15 of 18
@Shrak - I stand corrected. However with your level of skill and years of experience I'm confident you can make any distro work well for you. Not that there is a high degree of bloody complaints with Arch but there are enough bodies along the path that new adopters do need to proceed with some caution, IMHO. Frankly my respect for Arch is very high due to the fact that a core belief seems to be "We won't hold your hand while we do it for you, but we will provide excellent documentation so you can easily determine what to do for yourself". Just know what you are getting in for and what it expects from you is all I'm saying. Not everyone can hop into the drivers' seat of a Ferrari and just Go!...... just ask Eddie Griffin XD
NewMain
(16 items)
 
  
CPUMotherboardGraphicsRAM
Intel i5 - 3550 Asrock Z77 Extreme4 Evga GTX 1070Ti  4x2GB Corsair Vengeance 
Hard DriveOptical DriveCoolingOS
Seagate SATA 2TB x 2  Plextor PX-891SAW CM-Hyper N520 Slackware 14.2 MultiLib, Slackware 14.0 32 bit,... 
MonitorKeyboardPowerCase
32" Vizio HDTV + DLP Logitech Wireless Corsair HX-850 Antec Sonata I 
MouseMouse PadAudioOther
Razer DeathAdder 2013 dual ESI Juli@ CoolGear ExtSata Enclosure w/ Optical and 3TB S... 
  hide details  
Reply
NewMain
(16 items)
 
  
CPUMotherboardGraphicsRAM
Intel i5 - 3550 Asrock Z77 Extreme4 Evga GTX 1070Ti  4x2GB Corsair Vengeance 
Hard DriveOptical DriveCoolingOS
Seagate SATA 2TB x 2  Plextor PX-891SAW CM-Hyper N520 Slackware 14.2 MultiLib, Slackware 14.0 32 bit,... 
MonitorKeyboardPowerCase
32" Vizio HDTV + DLP Logitech Wireless Corsair HX-850 Antec Sonata I 
MouseMouse PadAudioOther
Razer DeathAdder 2013 dual ESI Juli@ CoolGear ExtSata Enclosure w/ Optical and 3TB S... 
  hide details  
Reply
post #16 of 18
Quote:
Originally Posted by enorbet2 View Post

@Shrak - I stand corrected. However with your level of skill and years of experience I'm confident you can make any distro work well for you. Not that there is a high degree of bloody complaints with Arch but there are enough bodies along the path that new adopters do need to proceed with some caution, IMHO. Frankly my respect for Arch is very high due to the fact that a core belief seems to be "We won't hold your hand while we do it for you, but we will provide excellent documentation so you can easily determine what to do for yourself". Just know what you are getting in for and what it expects from you is all I'm saying. Not everyone can hop into the drivers' seat of a Ferrari and just Go!...... just ask Eddie Griffin XD

Nope. I for the life of me, can't make Debian run as reliably as my Arch machines. Last time I tried Debian "stable", I had more breakages in 3 days of it than my now 8 or so years of Arch. Switching to Debian "testing" was a little better, but still riddled with ground breaking issues.

Granted, I technically could strip it down and build it back up piece by piece ( more so than just going with a minimal install ) and get a good result... but at that point I might as well not even use it.

Debian and I... well... we just don't get along. I honestly do less administrator work on my Arch machines that the rest of them, doesn't take much to set up, and takes even less to maintain.

As long as one simply pays attention to what they're doing and the beginners guide, the "bodies" on the path turns out to be a mirage and are really just a few cracks that would take a miracle to trip over tongue.gif
post #17 of 18
Quote:
Originally Posted by blaze2210 View Post

I get what you're saying, but I've tried a couple of distros that were fairly similar to Windows, but I seemed to find myself trying to "blend" my Windows knowledge into what I was learning about Linux. So for me personally, the "deep end" approach might be the thing that clearly separates the 2 OS's for me. biggrin.gif

If you want to try Gentoo, follow the Gentoo Handbook.. Installing Gentoo isn't that hard, its just very time consuming but you'll learn more in one install then you would using Ubuntu for a year. I would suggest unplugging your Windows drive during install so there are no mishaps. Set the linux drive in your bios as 1st bootable and install the bootloader on the linux drive so your not screwing with Windows' bootloader.
Boinc Desktop
(14 items)
 
CrunchAholic
(8 items)
 
 
CPUMotherboardGraphicsRAM
AMD Ryzen 7 1700X ASRock X370 Taichi Gigabyte GTX 970 G1 HyperX Predator 
Hard DriveCoolingCoolingCooling
Hyper Predator M.2 Watercool Heatkiller IV PRO AM4 CPU Block EKWB GTX 970 GPU Block EKWB Coolstream XE 240 Radiator 
CoolingCoolingOSPower
EKWB Coolstream PE 360 Radiator Watercool Heatkiller 150mm Tube Res Gentoo Linux EVGA 850 G2 
CaseMouse
Thermaltake View 31 Tempered Glass RGB Edition Roccat Kone EMP 
CPUCPUMotherboardGraphics
Intel Xeon E5-2670 Intel Xeon E5-2670 Asrock Rack EP2C602 XFX RX 480 RS 
RAMHard DriveOSPower
64 GBs Samsung M939B1K70CHD-CH9 PC3-10600R Samsung HD322HJ Arch Linux Corsair AX1200 
  hide details  
Reply
Boinc Desktop
(14 items)
 
CrunchAholic
(8 items)
 
 
CPUMotherboardGraphicsRAM
AMD Ryzen 7 1700X ASRock X370 Taichi Gigabyte GTX 970 G1 HyperX Predator 
Hard DriveCoolingCoolingCooling
Hyper Predator M.2 Watercool Heatkiller IV PRO AM4 CPU Block EKWB GTX 970 GPU Block EKWB Coolstream XE 240 Radiator 
CoolingCoolingOSPower
EKWB Coolstream PE 360 Radiator Watercool Heatkiller 150mm Tube Res Gentoo Linux EVGA 850 G2 
CaseMouse
Thermaltake View 31 Tempered Glass RGB Edition Roccat Kone EMP 
CPUCPUMotherboardGraphics
Intel Xeon E5-2670 Intel Xeon E5-2670 Asrock Rack EP2C602 XFX RX 480 RS 
RAMHard DriveOSPower
64 GBs Samsung M939B1K70CHD-CH9 PC3-10600R Samsung HD322HJ Arch Linux Corsair AX1200 
  hide details  
Reply
post #18 of 18
Quote:
Originally Posted by Diffident View Post

If you want to try Gentoo, follow the Gentoo Handbook.. Installing Gentoo isn't that hard, its just very time consuming but you'll learn more in one install then you would using Ubuntu for a year. I would suggest unplugging your Windows drive during install so there are no mishaps. Set the linux drive in your bios as 1st bootable and install the bootloader on the linux drive so your not screwing with Windows' bootloader.

Sweet! Thanks, I love info! I've done the manual install for a Linux distro before (I forget which one). It's definitely quite a bit more involved than installing Windows. biggrin.gif

At one point, I was triple-booting Win7, 8.1, and whatever distro I went after at that time. I was about to install the Mac OS for a quad-boot, but realized I'd never use it. I am no fan of Apple.... Hehehe....
New Posts  All Forums:Forum Nav:
  Return Home
  Back to Forum: Linux, Unix
Overclock.net › Forums › Software, Programming and Coding › Operating Systems › Linux, Unix › I want to try linux on a spare hard drive...help?