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6700k vdroop varies in different stress tests?

post #1 of 14
Thread Starter 
Howdy! I'm new to this forum and new to overclocking in general. I've been doing some gradual overclocking on my 6700k from 4.1ghz to 4.4ghz at stock voltage (1.280 in bios, or 1.296 in real time). At 4.4ghz I'm seeing some weird vdroop depending on the test I run. When running Realbench my vcore drops to a steady 1.256v. Running Prime95 at 1344k my vcore drops to a steady 1.248v. Then when I run small FFT in Prime95 my vcore drops to 1.232 and fluctuates, sometimes going as low as 1.224v steady. Why is my vcore dropping so low compared to the other tests? Could it have anything to do with my motherboard, the MSI z170a m5, which I read has a bad rap with vdroop?
post #2 of 14

Because the more demanding a program is on the CPU's cores, the further down it will droop. This doesn't mean that the Small FFTs test is the best one to use though.

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post #3 of 14
Thread Starter 
Quote:
Originally Posted by TwoCables View Post

Because the more demanding a program is on the CPU's cores, the further down it will droop. This doesn't mean that the Small FFTs test is the best one to use though.
Thank you for the explanation. I thought vdroop was constant. So that means the 1344k test is less demanding than the small FFTs test?
post #4 of 14
Quote:
Originally Posted by Hampster View Post


Thank you for the explanation. I thought vdroop was constant. So that means the 1344k test is less demanding than the small FFTs test?

 

I guess it could be worded that way. You'll find that everything causes a different amount of vDroop. No two programs will really cause the exact same amount of vDroop unless both programs being compared are doing the same thing to the CPU. Try comparing the vDroop from video games if possible to what you get from plain old Prime95 Blend.

 

I learned about this when I overclocked the Intel E2180 2.0 GHz Pentium Dual Core. I had an EVGA 680i SLI motherboard and I did the vDroop mod. The experimenting that I had to do in order to test my vDroop mod taught me that vDroop varies from load to load.

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post #5 of 14
Yup, vdroop seemed to be proportional to current draw/power usage when I was overclocking a 6600k. It might be the mATX motherboard, but the vdroop was much more than I've seen with my 4670k or Phenom II X4. But it's perfectly normally, try to compensate for it but otherwise don't worry about it. Higher LLC settings and tweaked VRM settings can help, depending on the motherboard.



FYI Prime95 isn't a good test for Skylake for another reason: it's relatively easy to pass on that architecture. With certain settings, you could run Prime95 for a day without any errors, but still regularly crash in games.

Check overclock.net's Skylake Overclocking Guide thread for the most up-to-date info, but last time I checked, x264 encoding is the preferred stress test. ROG Realbench is supposed to be OK as well.
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post #6 of 14
Thread Starter 
Quote:
Originally Posted by TwoCables View Post

I guess it could be worded that way. You'll find that everything causes a different amount of vDroop. No two programs will really cause the exact same amount of vDroop unless both programs being compared are doing the same thing to the CPU. Try comparing the vDroop from video games if possible to what you get from plain old Prime95 Blend.

I learned about this when I overclocked the Intel E2180 2.0 GHz Pentium Dual Core. I had an EVGA 680i SLI motherboard and I did the vDroop mod. The experimenting that I had to do in order to test my vDroop mod taught me that vDroop varies from load to load.

Thanks, I will try this! So you did something like this? https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=ZNkAQB7ONh4 Was it necessary before LLC settings in the bios?

Quote:
Originally Posted by brucethemoose View Post


FYI Prime95 isn't a good test for Skylake for another reason: it's relatively easy to pass on that architecture. With certain settings, you could run Prime95 for a day without any errors, but still regularly crash in games.

Check overclock.net's Skylake Overclocking Guide thread for the most up-to-date info, but last time I checked, x264 encoding is the preferred stress test. ROG Realbench is supposed to be OK as well.

To be honest, I just haven't been able to figure out how to use the x264 test he provided, which is why I'm using Prime95 and Realbench. I read the ROG Realbench is a variation of the x264.
Edited by Hampster - 11/3/15 at 9:14pm
post #7 of 14
Quote:
Originally Posted by Hampster View Post


Thanks, I will try this! So you did something like this? https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=ZNkAQB7ONh4 Was it necessary before LLC settings in the bios?

 

No, I had to use a pencil. It was the only thing we knew back then, and yes it was the only way to control vDroop. The amount of pencil "lead" I used determined the amount of vDroop control. So, to reduce my vDroop control, I would use the eraser. To increase it, I'd draw some more on the spots that needed pencil "lead". lol

 

Ever since then, I've always known that the amount of vDroop depends on the load. I think it's been like that ever since vDroop was invented (it's an intentional design).

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post #8 of 14
Thread Starter 
Quote:
Originally Posted by TwoCables View Post

No, I had to use a pencil. It was the only thing we knew back then, and yes it was the only way to control vDroop. The amount of pencil "lead" I used determined the amount of vDroop control. So, to reduce my vDroop control, I would use the eraser. To increase it, I'd draw some more on the spots that needed pencil "lead". lol

Ever since then, I've always known that the amount of vDroop depends on the load. I think it's been like that ever since vDroop was invented (it's an intentional design).

That's pretty funny, actually. biggrin.gif
post #9 of 14
Quote:
Originally Posted by Hampster View Post


That's pretty funny, actually. biggrin.gif

 

hehehe yeah I used to love the humor in it! I kinda miss those days. It was also a nice hands-on approach and it made me feel like I was truly in control. With LLC, it's certainly nice to have a much easier way to control vDroop, but it's just not the same feeling. :)

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CPUMotherboardGraphicsRAM
i5-2500K @ 4.5GHz (1.368-1.384V fixed voltage) ASUS P8P67 EVO B3 (UEFI ver. 1850) GTX 780 ASUS DirectCU II (1228 / 6300, 1.180V) G.SKILL Ripjaws X 8GB (2 x 4GB) 1866MHz, CL9 
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250 GB Samsung 840 EVO (OS) 3 TB Toshiba P300 (storage) Samsung SH-S243N 24x DVD Burner Samsung SH-S203N 20X DVD Burner 
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Corsair HX650 (Bronze, ordered on 12-12-2009) CM 690 Intellimouse Optical (1.1A) 1000Hz polling rate Basic, but premium round 
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It's a computer!
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CPUMotherboardGraphicsRAM
i5-2500K @ 4.5GHz (1.368-1.384V fixed voltage) ASUS P8P67 EVO B3 (UEFI ver. 1850) GTX 780 ASUS DirectCU II (1228 / 6300, 1.180V) G.SKILL Ripjaws X 8GB (2 x 4GB) 1866MHz, CL9 
Hard DriveHard DriveOptical DriveOptical Drive
250 GB Samsung 840 EVO (OS) 3 TB Toshiba P300 (storage) Samsung SH-S243N 24x DVD Burner Samsung SH-S203N 20X DVD Burner 
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Thermaltake Frio Win 7 Home Premium x64 SP1 Retail AOC G2460PG (24" 1920 x 1080 144Hz G-SYNC) Filco Majestouch 104-key Cherry MX Blues w/NKRO 
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Corsair HX650 (Bronze, ordered on 12-12-2009) CM 690 Intellimouse Optical (1.1A) 1000Hz polling rate Basic, but premium round 
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post #10 of 14
Thread Starter 
Quote:
Originally Posted by TwoCables View Post

hehehe yeah I used to love the humor in it! I kinda miss those days. It was also a nice hands-on approach and it made me feel like I was truly in control. With LLC, it's certainly nice to have a much easier way to control vDroop, but it's just not the same feeling. smile.gif

There is a charm about working with your hands. Some of my proudest accomplishments are the things I built by hand.
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