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If you call a spade a spade here, isn't variable refresh rate a gimmick of sorts particularly for Nvidia?

post #1 of 19
Thread Starter 
I am glad that some reviewers, like PCper, are starting to come clean about variable refresh rate. They are starting to inform the Noobs that on 120hz and 144hz monitors, variable refresh rate is irrelevant. There alot of people that are falling for the shills on Youtube and elsewhere believing that screen-tearing is this prevalent phenomenon and Nvidia and AMD saved us all by vouchsafing us with variable refresh rate monitors.

Nothing can be further from the truth. In all honesty, variable refresh rate is kinda of a gimmick to dupe the Noobs to pay a $300 premium for Nvidia's G-sync monitors (AMD's is open-sourced so they don't count really).

Even with 60hz monitors, if you enable V-sync, you probably won't see any screen-tearing, however, your framerate will drop. But at the end of the day, a 60hz monitor with or without variable refresh rate is still a 60hz monitor. V-sync enabled may drop it down below 60fps depending on the power of your GPU.

So what I am getting at is this: if you have a 120hz or 144hz monitors you definitely don't need variable refresh rate, but if you have a 60hz with a strong GPU, do you even need to pay an extra $300 for G-sync????
post #2 of 19
lolpcper

Variable refresh rate doesn't simply eliminate tearing. It also makes motion appear smoother.
    
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post #3 of 19
Tearing is less noticeable at higher refresh rates/frame rates but it's still there. Vsync eliminates tearing but introduces input lag and stutter instead. Variable refresh rate eliminates all of these issues.
You may not see the benefits because you are used to tearing or lag/stutter, but it's similar to HDD > SSD upgrade. Once you've experienced it you can't go back.

One interesting application of variable refresh rate is with emulators. I feel that it's a game-changer for these especially, due to fluctuating frametimes and refresh rates that don't match that of the monitor.

Now it's true that the cost of the Gsync module is a problem, and Freesync has more potential in that regard since Gsync will only ever be implemented on high end gaming screens that tend to disregard picture quality. However Freesync isn't on par with it yet, due to different monitors having different ranges and Freesync not having frame-doubling below the minimum refresh rate at the moment.
post #4 of 19
Quote:
Originally Posted by ToTheSun! View Post

lolpcper

Variable refresh rate doesn't simply eliminate tearing. It also makes motion appear smoother.

It does NOT remove sample and hold based motion blur.
It only cause frames to be rendered consistently smooth but it does not remove motion blur itself. People need to stop misleading people into thinking that gsync/freesync eliminates motion blur.

This is what gsync does.

http://www.testufo.com/#test=stutter&demo=gsync&foreground=FFFFFF&background=000000&max=12&pps=720

If you want motion blur removed you need 500 hz @ 500 fps-100hz @ 1000 fps (which you won't be getting) or a strobed/scanning backlight.

Black frame insertion/strobing can't be combined with variable refresh rate yet...with current strobing tech, the results would be VERY unpleasant if the FPS dropped under 72.
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post #5 of 19
Quote:
Originally Posted by Falkentyne View Post

Quote:
Originally Posted by ToTheSun! View Post

lolpcper

Variable refresh rate doesn't simply eliminate tearing. It also makes motion appear smoother.

It does NOT remove sample and hold based motion blur.
It only cause frames to be rendered consistently smooth but it does not remove motion blur itself. People need to stop misleading people into thinking that gsync/freesync eliminates motion blur.
Thank you for restating what i said. As for motion clarity, not really sure where, in my post, i said VRR would eliminate motion blur.
Edited by ToTheSun! - 11/7/15 at 4:31pm
    
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post #6 of 19
VRR does NOT eliminate motion blur! You need a strobed backlight for that. I explained that and you intentionally ignored it and trolled me. Sample and hold based motion blur is a product of persistent on fixed panel displays and you can't do a thing about that without a scanning backlight.

VRR simply gives smooth rendered frames (no hitching or stutters). Or maybe the correct word is CONSISTENT frames?

VRR does NOT turn 16ms persistence into 1 ms persistence. Not even Scotty with the Enterprise can pull that sort of Miracle!

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post #7 of 19
Quote:
Originally Posted by Falkentyne View Post

VRR does NOT eliminate motion blur! You need a strobed backlight for that. I explained that and you intentionally ignored it and trolled me.
Sorry, i'm still not seeing what in my post warranted such an explanation from you regarding motion clarity. But, sure, keep posting random facts about backlight strobing.
    
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post #8 of 19
I see what the OP is saying, VRR is irrelevant if you can maintain 120 of 144fps 100% of the time, but such is not the case in demanding titles with everything turned up even with a really powerful GPU/CPU. VRR lets you get a nice smooth gameplay experience when you're not pushing frames above your refresh rate consistently, in essence you get the benefits of vsync without the negatives like increased input lag, as well as not having to cap your framerate to any particular hz value.

EDIT: I also do agree that the premium nvidia charges for G-sync is absurd and they'd probably profit more if things were made cheaper and more people bought into the tech especially with how quickly freesync is emerging that offers the same benefits at little cost to the consumer. I already decided myself that i will not be buying into gsync, unless Nvidia offers it at the same price as comparable freesync monitors, but even then i would rather not buy into proprietary hardware on the PC platform which is supposed to be an open platform rolleyes.gif
Edited by Malinkadink - 11/7/15 at 11:02pm
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post #9 of 19
I remember when i played skyrim on my 6990 when it first came out (skyrim, not the 6990). The microstuttering was insane. Then i got single gpu's, and went to 670's, and I always noticed frame variance - although the 670's being 80% better made me choose to forever stick with nividia. Some people did not notice microstutter, I did. Then I tried gsync in games I always saw microstutter in, and in 90% of cases it was gone. The visuals smoothness went from 40% to 99%. The remaining 10% had stutter related to the graphics engines.

Is gsync worth 300 dollars? You bet it is. A high refresh goes SOME of the way towards making an experience smooth, it allows a consistency to framerates. For example, 40fps at 144hz, will look better than 40fps at 60hz, and i'm not even factoring in screen tearing at all. Just visual smoothness.

But it's 50% better rather than 99% better. Gsync takes it that extra mile. And creates that same smoothness you remember when you first played those perfectly vsynced games from the inception of voodoo cards on CRY monitors. It's the biggest jump for me since the transition from a 1600x900 TN panel to a 2560x1440 IPS panel 6 years ago. And the only thing I can compare to it, in terms of raw LEAP - is when I first saw bileaner filtered graphics and framerates when going from software rendering to hardware rendering in 1998.
post #10 of 19
Basically, compare my personal taste to be at the opposite end of the spectrum when compared to the OP.

Subjectivity and all that.
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