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TEC Chill Box Chamber Build log - Page 2

post #11 of 1668
Thread Starter 
http://imgur.com/a/WBnxm
room for wire now

Edited by toolmaker03 - 1/4/16 at 9:02pm
post #12 of 1668
nice work, hope you can get it all together and working without too much trouble, I know how frustrating and complex these builds can be, I've rebuilt my rig about 4 times in the last couple of months trying to find the right configuration and I'm only using a direct die TEC. I'm waiting on a few more parts and then I think I'll finally have it sorted. I can imagine how hard yours will be as it is so much more complicated. I admire your commitment to doing all you can to prevent issues with condensation, it always a risk and insulating like I have can only do so much. I'll attempt a chill box one day but I don't think I'll ever be ambitious enough to attempt a full on vacuum chamber. I'd be happy with chilling the air inside the sealed chill box which will lower the dew point well below the coolant temperature so no risk of insulation except maybe at start up, your sealed vacuum chamber shouldn't have those issues as long as you don't need to open it.
post #13 of 1668
Thread Starter 
http://imgur.com/ret6l8m
ret6l8m.jpg

ok so I used a old motherboard to get my measurements as to where I needed to epoxy the standoff's on the bottom of the case, my DX79SR board is the same size as this one and this one has the same mounting holes to.
yea I started this build, and then after I really got into it I started to realize how much modding it would require to complete, so I gave myself a year at most, and 6 months at least.
well I will try to give pics of the completed work as I go, and I will try to explain the final builds on how to mount all of it.
Edited by toolmaker03 - 1/4/16 at 7:47pm
post #14 of 1668
Some folks have mentioned putting a fan in the box. Question: What would the fan be moving in a vacuum? Answer: Nothing because it's a vacuum!
post #15 of 1668
Thread Starter 
not true, I could vacuum the chamber for years, and never get all the atmosphere out of the vacuum chamber.
don't think of it like space, think of it more like I am thinning the atmosphere, its not breathable, but still there, and it is not under a constant dynamic vacuum, (meaning that the vacuum pump is on all the time) I only turn the vacuum pump on for 3 minutes a day.
so what are the fans moving around inside the vacuum chamber? really thin cold atmosphere. (hopefully)
post #16 of 1668
Thread Starter 

http://imgur.com/a/ZqtK8
fan placement for this build, the idea is to try and prevent hot spots from forming inside the chest.
Edited by toolmaker03 - 1/4/16 at 7:53pm
post #17 of 1668
Sorry, I assumed you were pulling 30 in/hg of vacuum like you would with an A/C pump. In this case the molecular mean free path would be too great for a fan to be effective. Also vacuum is a state, not a process, so it doesn't matter if the pump is running or not.
post #18 of 1668
Thread Starter 
true, it is a state, and what I noticed in my test build, is that when I ran the vacuum pump, it not only keep the humidity level low inside the chest, but it would also suck the cold out of the chest, the internal chest temps would rise from 15C to 25C while the vacuum pump was on, and it would take about 20 minutes after I turned the pump off before the internal chest temps would drop back to 15C.

the chest will hold a 30 on my cheap vacuum gage with the pump on, and after I shut the pump off, it will hold 30 solid for about 36 hours after the pump is turned off, before I will notice a change on the gage. that is why I turn the pump on once a day, to keep a vacuum state constant inside the chest.
post #19 of 1668
So if you were to first put your chamber into a "perfect" vacuum (29.92 in/hg) and then fill the chamber with a hygrophobic gas back to atmospheric pressure then you would achieve your desired results for a greater length of time. Because, leaving it in a vacuum state, your chamber will leak (suck) outside air into it between the strands of wires of your cabling;. In reality, your not actually changing the hydrophilic properties of the gasses in the chamber the way you've described your process. Which is what I think you are trying to do.
post #20 of 1668
Quote:
Originally Posted by toolmaker03 View Post

true, it is a state, and what I noticed in my test build, is that when I ran the vacuum pump, it not only keep the humidity level low inside the chest, but it would also suck the cold out of the chest, the internal chest temps would rise from 15C to 25C while the vacuum pump was on, and it would take about 20 minutes after I turned the pump off before the internal chest temps would drop back to 15C.

the chest will hold a 30 on my cheap vacuum gage with the pump on, and after I shut the pump off, it will hold 30 solid for about 36 hours after the pump is turned off, before I will notice a change on the gage. that is why I turn the pump on once a day, to keep a vacuum state constant inside the chest.

The issue might be that you're not pumping it long enough to remove all of the vapor. I was a mechanic for a lot of years and have read on many occasions that, to make sure you get complete evacuation of an A/C system, you need to leave the pump run for at least 3 hours. There was scientific data backing up the reasoning. I can only assume it would be the case with what we're doing.

I'm still in the design phase of my chiller box. I have all the "stuff". Now I just have to enclose it. I was thinking of replacing the evacuated air from the box with nitrogen gas. That way outside air won't be sucked into it like I stated above. My thinking is that if the inside and outside of the box are of equal pressure then there is less likelihood of the gasses exchanging places.
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