Overclock.net › Forums › Cooling › Specialized Cooling › Peltiers / TEC › TEC Chill Box Chamber Build log
New Posts  All Forums:Forum Nav:

TEC Chill Box Chamber Build log - Page 42

post #411 of 1668
If you ground your pc case using the ground line on the socket wall and wiring soldering a wire or wrapp it on the metal part of pc case that could solve the plorbem
post #412 of 1668
Thread Starter 
well it looks bad, but it not about looks its about what it does.
http://imgur.com/aAaAlNb

I am not a painter, and this stuff goes on like water.
post #413 of 1668
Quote:
Originally Posted by toolmaker03 View Post

ok, so how do I know that there is a strong static field forming inside of the ice chest?

because on my test build, when I opened the ice chest after running the PC, I could feel the static field on the surface of the plastic inside of the ice chest.
I don't know how strong or how much electricity was there but I could feel it. the same way I can feel the static field on the surface of a balloon, after rubbing it on a piece of wool.
or more common static field, is the one created on the surface of a tube television screen, after the TV has been turned off, you can feel the static field that was created on the surface of the screen.

Are you 100% sure this is correct?
In my understanding, you got the static buildup because there was no medium to carry away any build up charge.

Look at it this way. In the summer, when walking around the house, the air is humid and because of that the static charge you build up by walking around leaks fast enough away so you don't get shocks every time you touch a ground. When, in the winter, your heating is on, the air will get relatively less humid, making it harder to leak your static energy => causing you to get shocks from grounded equipment all day long.

It is the same with your vacuum chamber. By removing all the air, you remove all the moisture (which you desire). This will heighten the resistance of the 'air', thus making the leaking of low static charges impossible. Thís is why you felt that there was a field building up inside your chest. Normally it would be too weak to be felt since all gets leaked away due to the low resistance of moist air.


By adding the ESD coating you effectively increase the resistance even more. If I'm right, this will only delay the moment till the moment when the build-up voltage is high enough, making it's impact even more disastrous.
If I were you I'd definitely ground the case, but also wrap the inside of the vacuumbox in aluminium foil, which you of course have to ground as well. There will still be a static buildup between the vacuumbox and all the grounded components. However the closest thing to the box is the aluminium shielding so that will effectively be a shield protecting your components from getting shot by a couple of thousand volts.
I'd by the way definitely add a huge (1Mohm) resistor between the aluminium foil and the ground, as well as an elco. Otherwise you effectively feed the static discharge directly into the ground which will then still ruin your components.
post #414 of 1668
Quote:
Originally Posted by Jetskyer View Post

By adding the ESD coating you effectively increase the resistance even more. If I'm right, this will only delay the moment till the moment when the build-up voltage is high enough, making it's impact even more disastrous.
If I were you I'd definitely ground the case, but also wrap the inside of the vacuumbox in aluminium foil, which you of course have to ground as well. There will still be a static buildup between the vacuumbox and all the grounded components. However the closest thing to the box is the aluminium shielding so that will effectively be a shield protecting your components from getting shot by a couple of thousand volts.
I'd by the way definitely add a huge (1Mohm) resistor between the aluminium foil and the ground, as well as an elco. Otherwise you effectively feed the static discharge directly into the ground which will then still ruin your components.

The aluminum foil lining would be like creating a grounded Faraday cage inside the cooler, excellent idea!

That should effectively remove the static before it can even build up at all, as long as he grounds it.

The Igloo cooler may not even handle the vacuum pressure over time and literally implode, it is not designed to handle a vacuum much less resist the atmospheric pressure once the vacuum is formed inside.

After looking at successful pressure designs of vacuum chambers I don't see an Igloo cooler in there anywhere?

https://www.google.com/search?q=Vacuum+Chamber+construction&tbm=isch&tbo=u&source=univ&sa=X&ved=0ahUKEwi3qL2dpITMAhXBloMKHSwRCC0QsAQIJQ&biw=1920&bih=954
Edited by OCAddict - 4/10/16 at 7:35am
post #415 of 1668
Thread Starter 
Quote:
Originally Posted by Jetskyer View Post

Are you 100% sure this is correct?
In my understanding, you got the static buildup because there was no medium to carry away any build up charge.

Look at it this way. In the summer, when walking around the house, the air is humid and because of that the static charge you build up by walking around leaks fast enough away so you don't get shocks every time you touch a ground. When, in the winter, your heating is on, the air will get relatively less humid, making it harder to leak your static energy => causing you to get shocks from grounded equipment all day long.

It is the same with your vacuum chamber. By removing all the air, you remove all the moisture (which you desire). This will heighten the resistance of the 'air', thus making the leaking of low static charges impossible. Thís is why you felt that there was a field building up inside your chest. Normally it would be too weak to be felt since all gets leaked away due to the low resistance of moist air.


By adding the ESD coating you effectively increase the resistance even more. If I'm right, this will only delay the moment till the moment when the build-up voltage is high enough, making it's impact even more disastrous.
If I were you I'd definitely ground the case, but also wrap the inside of the vacuumbox in aluminium foil, which you of course have to ground as well. There will still be a static buildup between the vacuumbox and all the grounded components. However the closest thing to the box is the aluminium shielding so that will effectively be a shield protecting your components from getting shot by a couple of thousand volts.
I'd by the way definitely add a huge (1Mohm) resistor between the aluminium foil and the ground, as well as an elco. Otherwise you effectively feed the static discharge directly into the ground which will then still ruin your components.

so glue some aluminum foil to the interior walls of the chest and attach a wire to the foil and wire that to a grounding plug?
also to ground the chest do I just attach a wire to the plastic ice chest and ground that to a plug, do I ground the inside the chest, or outside of the chest or both?
should I make a grounding strip for all of this, or keep them separate?
I also need to ground the power supplies a little better too.

I don't understand how the resister should be wired, Into this ground between the foil, could you please explain that part a little more descriptively?
Edited by toolmaker03 - 4/10/16 at 12:05pm
post #416 of 1668
Thread Starter 
Quote:
Originally Posted by Jetskyer View Post

Are you 100% sure this is correct?
In my understanding, you got the static buildup because there was no medium to carry away any build up charge..
I am 100% positive that my understanding could be backwards, I have a tendency to do that. biggrin.gif dam dyslexia redface.gif
post #417 of 1668
@toolmaker03,

Have you at least taken into consideration that some motherboard, graphics card, etc. individual components, like capacitors for example may not do well in a vacuum?
post #418 of 1668
@toolmaker03,

How about cooling motherboard components that relied on case airflow to cool them?

In a vacuum there is no airflow, so how will you cool those?
post #419 of 1668
Thread Starter 
so this is what I am working on now, getting DX79SR build, into the PC case modded to a size that fits inside the vacuum chamber.
http://imgur.com/a/VI4tB

post #420 of 1668
Thread Starter 
Quote:
Originally Posted by OCAddict View Post

@toolmaker03,

How about cooling motherboard components that relied on case airflow to cool them?

In a vacuum there is no airflow, so how will you cool those?

radiated loss of coldness, from the blocks, tubing, and the reservoirs, I thinking that I will not insulate the reservoir, as this might work to my disadvantage, as I need some radiated loss of coldness inside the vacuum chamber, one to keep things cool, and also to prevent the inside of the vacuum chamber from warming up from the components radiated heat.


http://imgur.com/a/ZqtK8

in my test build with the PC active the water temps held at 0C, and the temps inside the chamber held at 15C, the reason for this was radiated coldness from the block and the reservoirs.

a interesting point I discovered, was that when I ran the vacuum pump the temps inside the vacuum chamber would rise to 25C, and after I turned the pump off, the temps would drop back to the 15C temp, that would hold constant while the PC was active.

with nothing active or no load on the system the temps on the water where at -25C and the temps inside the chamber where at -20C. but the chamber was sweating at this temp, so I had radiated loss of coldness through the chamber, if I had insolated the chamber better the temps would have been the same.
Edited by toolmaker03 - 4/10/16 at 11:59am
New Posts  All Forums:Forum Nav:
  Return Home
  Back to Forum: Peltiers / TEC
Overclock.net › Forums › Cooling › Specialized Cooling › Peltiers / TEC › TEC Chill Box Chamber Build log