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Nikon D60 accessories and tips for a beginner - Page 2

post #11 of 31
Thread Starter 
Quote:
Originally Posted by Scott1541 View Post

Don't spend too much on a tripod though, especially if its going to be something you only use occasionally. $50 as you stated in the OP should be able to get you something relatively decent. Look for one with a ball head, they're more flexible than pan heads, and in that price range any pan/tilt head is probably going to be less than adequate, you can't really go wrong with a ball head.

For SD cards I tend to go for Sandisk Ultra/Extreme or Lexar Professional cards, I've got a few of each and neither have failed on me yet, unlike some cheaper cards. Most of my cards are 32GB as I don't like having too much on a card at once in case of failure, etc..

Alright, sounds like a good plan then. Normally I go with Samsung cards but I'll look some stuff up.

There was supposed to be another question in there last night, a out which format I should have the images stored in?

I'll post up some tripods I find later today and see what you think.
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post #12 of 31
Quote:
Originally Posted by maddangerous View Post

I do want to play around with time lapse (not sure what else I'd do with longer exposure, but I intend to find out!) and I figure that in some scenarios a tripod will be more useful. In a way, I kind of know what a longer exposure time DOES, i.e. how it works, but not really what the end result is. But yes, still very much so need to learn the camera, and I really need to learn more about lighting.

Long exposure give you a feel of motion in the image you can use it for skies at night to get star trails as the earth rotates or for water to get that "Dreamy" look. This image was long exposure with the camera resting on a hand rail with a tripod you get a much better quality in the water but you can see how it kinda "ghosts" the water. Second image is the same waterfall not long exposure

Bill Speelman

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post #13 of 31
Quote:
Originally Posted by maddangerous View Post


There was supposed to be another question in there last night, a out which format I should have the images stored in?

As your just starting out I would store them in the highest quality JPEG for now. I think nikon names it Fine but not sure if the D60 had a different name. Raw files are nice to play around with post processing but are not readable without either the nikon software or some other software similar to Adobe Lightroom.
post #14 of 31
As above, unless you're intending to edit/process the photos afterwards, shoot in the highest quality, largest JPEG setting you can, the D60 is only 10MP so you don't need to worry about large files. If you do want to edit the photos using some software, such as lightroom or photoshop (others are available), then shooting in raw would be better as this saves the raw sensor data from the camera, hence the name.
     
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post #15 of 31
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Quote:
Originally Posted by locrian1288 View Post

Long exposure give you a feel of motion in the image you can use it for skies at night to get star trails as the earth rotates or for water to get that "Dreamy" look. This image was long exposure with the camera resting on a hand rail with a tripod you get a much better quality in the water but you can see how it kinda "ghosts" the water. Second image is the same waterfall not long exposure
Warning: Spoiler! (Click to show)

Bill Speelman

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Wow those are nice shots! I see what you mean. Did the sun come out in the second one more, I notice the lighting is a little different? Or is some of that a side effect of the exposure times?
Quote:
Originally Posted by locrian1288 View Post

As your just starting out I would store them in the highest quality JPEG for now. I think nikon names it Fine but not sure if the D60 had a different name. Raw files are nice to play around with post processing but are not readable without either the nikon software or some other software similar to Adobe Lightroom.
Quote:
Originally Posted by Scott1541 View Post

As above, unless you're intending to edit/process the photos afterwards, shoot in the highest quality, largest JPEG setting you can, the D60 is only 10MP so you don't need to worry about large files. If you do want to edit the photos using some software, such as lightroom or photoshop (others are available), then shooting in raw would be better as this saves the raw sensor data from the camera, hence the name.

Alright, I'll stick with highest quality jpeg for now, I might take a few in raw just for the heck of it to use later when I get there.
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post #16 of 31
Thank you. There are much better examples out there.

The lighting may have changed slightly but it could also have been a factor of incorrect exposure on the long exposure. There is also an element of tree sway that I think may have affected some of the light on the left along with a slightly different angle in the image.
post #17 of 31
Some great advice here.

Two things i'd like to add:

1. The Tripod would also be fantastic for your product shots. I put my camera on a Tripod for my product still shots because it allows you to have a extremely slow shutter speed and a lower ISO for clearer shots. With it being on a tripod it won't move obviously, so you can open the shutter longer and not have to worry about blurriness in your shots. Being able to do that gives you the ability to shoot at a lower ISO to have a very clear product shot with very high definition. One thing to note when shooting on a tripod, Turn Off Image Stabilization. It will be trying to correct something that is not moving and will cause problems with your shoots.

2. I would always shoot in RAW personally. A 32gb card can hold ~800 RAW photos in 10mp. RAW is about 3x larger file than Fine JPEG so if you are going to run out of space drop it down to Fine JPEG. Being RAW you can capture higher quality for editing and also will convert into a lot nicer JPEG photo once you throw it on a software. Which brings me to my next point, look into maybe getting Adobe Photoshop Elements 14 - you can find it on Amazon for $70 fairly frequently. It would be a great starting point for you in editing files and can progress with you over time. First, it can convert any RAW photo into a High Quality JPEG which I think is the better way to get a JPEG opposed to shooting in JPEG. (Personal opinion, have no evidence to support and hard to since we all see differently) It also has 3 modes that you can work with - Quick, Guided, Expert. With quick mode you can select a whole batch of photos and just hit Smart Fix, then convert to high quality JPEG and throw it on social media. I will use this for photos that I don't think can be turned into anything better or just aren't worth it. Next is guided mode, this will allow you to choose an effect or edit you would like to do and as the name suggests, guide you through it. Finally when you have the hang of it just hop into Expert mode and go to town. If you decide you want to dive into Photography more than I would definitely suggest Lightroom once you can be efficient in the Expert mode.

Just my 2cents.gif

P.S.
Take you camera out shooting and take several pictures until your battery goes from full to dead. Find out how many pics you took in the format you want to shoot in and how long it lasted and buy more batteries accordingly for your honeymoon. You will be gone a good part of the day then. I personally have 3 batteries and 2 SD cards for my camera. Covers me on a 9-12 hour trip for power and storage. However every camera is different.
post #18 of 31
Quote:
Originally Posted by Jiryama View Post

Some great advice here.

Two things i'd like to add:

1. The Tripod would also be fantastic for your product shots. I put my camera on a Tripod for my product still shots because it allows you to have a extremely slow shutter speed and a lower ISO for clearer shots. With it being on a tripod it won't move obviously, so you can open the shutter longer and not have to worry about blurriness in your shots. Being able to do that gives you the ability to shoot at a lower ISO to have a very clear product shot with very high definition. One thing to note when shooting on a tripod, Turn Off Image Stabilization. It will be trying to correct something that is not moving and will cause problems with your shoots.

2. I would always shoot in RAW personally. A 32gb card can hold ~800 RAW photos in 10mp. RAW is about 3x larger file than Fine JPEG so if you are going to run out of space drop it down to Fine JPEG. Being RAW you can capture higher quality for editing and also will convert into a lot nicer JPEG photo once you throw it on a software. Which brings me to my next point, look into maybe getting Adobe Photoshop Elements 14 - you can find it on Amazon for $70 fairly frequently. It would be a great starting point for you in editing files and can progress with you over time. First, it can convert any RAW photo into a High Quality JPEG which I think is the better way to get a JPEG opposed to shooting in JPEG. (Personal opinion, have no evidence to support and hard to since we all see differently) It also has 3 modes that you can work with - Quick, Guided, Expert. With quick mode you can select a whole batch of photos and just hit Smart Fix, then convert to high quality JPEG and throw it on social media. I will use this for photos that I don't think can be turned into anything better or just aren't worth it. Next is guided mode, this will allow you to choose an effect or edit you would like to do and as the name suggests, guide you through it. Finally when you have the hang of it just hop into Expert mode and go to town. If you decide you want to dive into Photography more than I would definitely suggest Lightroom once you can be efficient in the Expert mode.

Just my 2cents.gif

P.S.
Take you camera out shooting and take several pictures until your battery goes from full to dead. Find out how many pics you took in the format you want to shoot in and how long it lasted and buy more batteries accordingly for your honeymoon. You will be gone a good part of the day then. I personally have 3 batteries and 2 SD cards for my camera. Covers me on a 9-12 hour trip for power and storage. However every camera is different.
I would agree with all this. Raw is great to shoot in (I personally always use it). I've never used elements but light room is a fantastic program for post processing, photo management, exporting to usable files (jpeg etc) and uploading to social media sites.
post #19 of 31
Thread Starter 
OK, I have not really looked at straps yet (probably tonight) but I have seen 2 tripods that seem alright for a basic setup. Also have not looked at bags at all, but for now I'm not too concerned about that.

Sunpak 61" pistol grip
Amazon basics 61"

Those are both ball mount, as per advice given above. Do any of you have any thoughts? I do kind of like the pistol grip, it might make it easier to angle the camera.

Also, I'm going to go out and shoot for a day until the battery is dead (or SD card is full), I'm going back home to visit family this weekend and I have a few spots I've always wanted to go to for some nice shots, so I'm going to try to get out for that.

Thanks to everyone so much again for the help and tips
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post #20 of 31
I am not a tripod guru but based on reviews and personal experience out of those two I would go with the amazon basics one. Sunpack, while decently made, do feel very cheap (owned one) and the one I had was not very sturdy. I replaced that with a Manfrotto entry level model. Hopefully one of the others that was involved can offer up some better advise for this.

PS: would love to see some your better shots when after you get back from your trip. best way to improve is through critiquing wink.gif
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