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"To skip disk checking, press any key within X sec" message on boot after Win 10 install

post #1 of 6
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I started getting that message. I installed Win 10 on an SSD and while I was installing it all other drives were disconnected. After i reconnected the old HDD (with Win 7 on it) and after a few reboots in both versions of Windows, I started getting this message every single time during boot - it doesn't matter whether I boot into 7 or 10. I found out in Win 10 Notifications there is a "Restart to repair drive errors" message and also in Control Panel - Security and Maintenance there's the same message right below Maintenance. I can "Turn off messages about Drive status" but I wonder if it's something important I should pay attention to, or is it just a generic harmless bug that happens from time to time in such scenarios? I guess the same Notification has appeared in the Win 7 install on the HDD because as I already said I started getting the same message during boot of both Windows versions, not only one of them. The first time it appeared is when I booted into Win 7, and after that it started appearing on Win 10 boot screen as well. Notice that when I want to switch between Win 7 and 10 I enter UEFI BIOS every time and when I turn off CSM (Compatibility Support Module) which is needed to boot in WIn 7, I can only boot into Win 10, and when I want to boot into Win 7, I simply enable CSM and rearrange boot priority options/order.
post #2 of 6
Quote:
Originally Posted by Jake3 View Post

I started getting that message. I installed Win 10 on an SSD and while I was installing it all other drives were disconnected..
That was your mistake. There's very few (if any) valid reasons for disconnecting drives when doing an install. Windows Install will see all your drives and OSs and then you will get a boot menu whenever the computer starts up.

What you have now is two drives connected, both with boot sectors on them. The boot sector tells the computer where the OS files (ie. Windows folder) is located so that the OS can be loaded. Each of your OSs "sees" the other drive, but isn't "aware" of the OS that's there. That just confuses the OSs as you switch back and forth between them. They think they made some kind of disk error because files are getting changed/deleted and the OS didn't do it (the other one did).

Either reinstall correctly with all the drives connected (after a reformat of the SSD) or use BCDEdit or better EasyBCD to fix the boot sector(s).
 
 
Edited by billbartuska - 1/30/16 at 4:47am
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post #3 of 6
Thread Starter 
Quote:
Originally Posted by billbartuska View Post

That was your mistake. There's very few (if any) valid reasons for disconnecting drives when doing an install. Windows Install will see all your drives and OSs and then you will get a boot menu whenever the computer starts up.

What you have now is two drives connected, both with boot sectors on them. The boot sector tells the computer where the OS files (ie. Windows folder) is located so that the OS can be loaded. Each of your OSs "sees" the other drive, but isn't "aware" of the OS that's there. That just confuses the OSs as you switch back and forth between them. They think they made some kind of disk error because files are getting changed/deleted and the OS didn't do it (the other one did).

Either reinstall correctly with all the drives connected (after a reformat of the SSD) or use BCDEdit or better EasyBCD to fix the boot sector(s).
 
 

Then that's quite interesting. In this very forum I got the recommendation to "just unplug all the other drives while installing, just to be sure nothing goes wrong and that some GPT partition doesn't get installed on the HDD (mistakenly) instead of on the SSD" or something along those lines. Anyway, I've got a few more reasons to reinstall Windows 10 because I messed up a few other things as well, so I guess I'll just do it and won't use any of the software you mentioned, thanks anyway. But will all of those messages disappear and everything get back to normal after I wipe the SSD? Is this enough to fix the problem and message appearing on the Win 7 install on the HDD? BTW, the message stopped appearing on Win 10 boot, though the message stays when I check Control Panel - Security and Maintenance but it's now orange instead of red. Also, would it be best to use the Samsung Magician Secure erase option for wiping the drive since it's an 850 Pro?
post #4 of 6
Quote:
Originally Posted by Jake3 View Post

..just to be sure nothing goes wrong and that some GPT partition doesn't get installed on the HDD (mistakenly) instead of on the SSD"

That's exactly what is supposed to happen Please be aware that it doesn't make any difference what-so-ever where the Windows folder is located. You can put it anywhere you want, any drive/any partition. You do that by choosing where to install Windows. What does matter is onto which drive the boot sector goes! And that will always be the drive that is set as the boot device in your BIOS. Note that when you removed your HDD it was no longer listed as the boot device in your BIOS - it was gone! Bot it still has a boot sector on it which now Windows Install couldn't see.

But will all of those messages disappear and everything get back to normal after I wipe the SSD? Is this enough to fix the problem and message appearing on the Win 7 install on the HDD?

That all depends on how you do the new install, not on wiping the drive.

There's no need to "wipe the drive". Just format it during the Win 10 install and that will take care of everything. Note that your HDD will remain as the "boot device though. If, at a later date you want to get rid of Win 7 (and you will) then you have to use BCDEdit or EasyBCD or else start all over again installing Win 10 and format of all your drives. But like I said above you could right now use BCDEdit or EastBCD to fix everything you've done.
Edited by billbartuska - 1/30/16 at 8:42am
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post #5 of 6
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Quote:
Originally Posted by billbartuska View Post

There's no need to "wipe the drive". Just format it during the Win 10 install and that will take care of everything. Note that your HDD will remain as the "boot device though. If, at a later date you want to get rid of Win 7 (and you will) then you have to use BCDEdit or EasyBCD or else start all over again installing Win 10 and format of all your drives. But like I said above you could right now use BCDEdit or EastBCD to fix everything you've done.

I've got a few more questions:

1. What exactly is the difference between formatting and using the Secure erase option from Samsung Magician software? Any difference between Secure erase from Samsung Magician software vs the one from Parted Magic?

2. "That all depends on how you do the new install, not on wiping the drive." If I just reinstall Win 10 on the SSD with the HDD connected, it will be fine, correct? Meaning, this is the only thing necessary, right?

3. Let's assume I reinstall Win 10 (or use BCDEdit/EastBCD) and everything is fine after that. Will I start getting the same message if I disconnect the HDD sometime later, and boot into Win 10 with the HDD disconnected? Also, would there be any difference in overall performance and/or boot times if I first completely throw away the HDD and then install Win 10 on the SSD, compared to installing Win 10 on the SSD together with the Win 7 install on the HDD?
post #6 of 6
Quote:
Originally Posted by Jake3 View Post

Quote:
Originally Posted by billbartuska View Post

There's no need to "wipe the drive". Just format it during the Win 10 install and that will take care of everything. Note that your HDD will remain as the "boot device though. If, at a later date you want to get rid of Win 7 (and you will) then you have to use BCDEdit or EasyBCD or else start all over again installing Win 10 and format of all your drives. But like I said above you could right now use BCDEdit or EastBCD to fix everything you've done.

I've got a few more questions:

1. What exactly is the difference between formatting and using the Secure erase option from Samsung Magician software? Any difference between Secure erase from Samsung Magician software vs the one from Parted Magic?

On any HDD or SSD there is a place where information that lists the locations of all the files is kept. Your computer uses that information to find the files it needs from the drive or to find empty spaces to put new files into. Formatting removes that "location" information, but does not actually delete any of the files themselves, they are still there but the computer just doesn't know they are. A Secure Erase writes zeros over all the locations on a drive, all the files are replaced with zeros, so, in essence, all the files are deleted and replaced by the number zero.

2. "That all depends on how you do the new install, not on wiping the drive." If I just reinstall Win 10 on the SSD with the HDD connected, it will be fine, correct? Meaning, this is the only thing necessary, right?

Yes, but at the beginning of the install you will get an option to format. Format the drive you want to install to.

3. Let's assume I reinstall Win 10 (or use BCDEdit/EastBCD) and everything is fine after that.

Those are two completely different ways of doing it and will have different results. When you say "reinstall", reinstall what to where?
As for using Easy BCD - see below


Will I start getting the same message if I disconnect the HDD sometime later, and boot into Win 10 with the HDD disconnected? Also, would there be any difference in overall performance and/or boot times if I first completely throw away the HDD and then install Win 10 on the SSD, compared to installing Win 10 on the SSD together with the Win 7 install on the HDD?

If both OSs are on the SSD both will be faster. If Win 7 is on the HDD it will be slower than if it were on the SSD.

The below:

When you install any OS two things happen
1.) A drive is set up to be the "Boot Device" This is done by writing a very tiny bit of computer code at the very beginning of the drive (the first sector). This code tells the computer where the Windows Folder is located. When any computer boots up it loads that tiny bit of code into memory and runs it so the computer can find the Windows Folder and run the files it needs for booting up.

2.) The Windows Folder is created and the appropriate files are copied there.

Note that the boot drive can be any drive and the Windows Folder can be put on ant drive, they don't have to be the came drive.

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