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The Devil's Canyon is burning hot - Page 6

post #51 of 56
Thread Starter 
Quote:
Originally Posted by emsj86 View Post

Question on he delis process is it possible to have the heat spreader glued back in place. I wouldn't mind to delid but I don't like the fact he heat spreader is just held in by the gpu mount.

This thread has general info about delidding, they were recently talking about different adhesives to glue the IHS back on with. It looks like really thin superglue might be best but just use very little, or else the IHS wont properly contact the die. Put the small drops in the corners of the heat spreader and apply pressure for at least an hour. (you could clamp it in your mobo as long as you're sure the glue won't run, less is more!)

This thread is where I got my delidder, it looks like they want to make a relid tool and a custom water block as well.
post #52 of 56
It's kinda late now since you delidded your CPU (10°c less doesn't worth the risk IMO). But what's your vcore??? I was getting very high temps with my 4790k but it was because the auto vcore was 1.301 under load, too high for 4.4 GHz. I set it to manual 1.125 and my temps dropped almost 20°c on P95 and other stress test (even when it's summer and my room is warm). It's running stable so far. Also, run P95 v26.6, newer versions will give you extremely high and unrealistic temps because they run AVX instructions. My cooler is Noctua NH-D15 by the way.
post #53 of 56
Thread Starter 
Quote:
Originally Posted by lenny23 View Post

It's kinda late now since you delidded your CPU (10°c less doesn't worth the risk IMO). But what's your vcore??? I was getting very high temps with my 4790k but it was because the auto vcore was 1.301 under load, too high for 4.4 GHz. I set it to manual 1.125 and my temps dropped almost 20°c on P95 and other stress test (even when it's summer and my room is warm). It's running stable so far. Also, run P95 v26.6, newer versions will give you extremely high and unrealistic temps because they run AVX instructions. My cooler is Noctua NH-D15 by the way.

At the time my vcore was set on auto, which puts it at about 1.25v I've since lowered it to 1.2v and its holding up under stress (P95 LargeFFT&SmallFFT) for 9+ hours. Temps have gotten a lot better, I lapped my H212 with sandpaper from 250 grit to 2000 for a polished finish (got rid of a lot of gaps in the surface) and applied less TIM for more metal-to-metal contact where the TIM only fills in remaining gaps.

I also discovered that the IHS sits directly on the die, not the PCB. There is a hairline gap between the IHS edge and the surface of the PCB all the way around. This is good since you want a little gap for air to escape when things get hot and the air expands.
post #54 of 56
Quote:
Originally Posted by frozenoden View Post

I also discovered that the IHS sits directly on the die, not the PCB. There is a hairline gap between the IHS edge and the surface of the PCB all the way around. This is good since you want a little gap for air to escape when things get hot and the air expands.
You are blowing smoke with no fire.
There is no reason for there it be a gap between IHS and PCB.
post #55 of 56
Thread Starter 
Quote:
Originally Posted by doyll View Post

You are blowing smoke with no fire.
There is no reason for there it be a gap between IHS and PCB.

Just speculation, I admit. But Consider that when Intel applies glue to the IHS, they leave a space with no glue, which prevents a perfect seal. What reason would they have to leave a gap in the glue, and a gap between the IHS and PCB? Its at least 1/10 a millimeter off the surface, too large to be a design oversight.
post #56 of 56
Quote:
Originally Posted by frozenoden View Post

Just speculation, I admit. But Consider that when Intel applies glue to the IHS, they leave a space with no glue, which prevents a perfect seal. What reason would they have to leave a gap in the glue, and a gap between the IHS and PCB? Its at least 1/10 a millimeter off the surface, too large to be a design oversight.
Not to doubt you are correct, but it seems a very hard way to allow for air pressure equalization. Trying to lay a bead of sealant just the right amough and right spacing to get a small gap after being pressed into place. Seems it would be much easier to do with a small hole in the PCB.
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