Overclock.net › Forums › Cooling › Air Cooling › Cooling techniques in highly restrictive/silent cases + H440 New Edition Review.
New Posts  All Forums:Forum Nav:

Cooling techniques in highly restrictive/silent cases + H440 New Edition Review.

post #1 of 29
Thread Starter 
Before we begin I want to thank doyll for inspiring this thread and for being so active and the forum. I strongly recommend going through:

doyll’s * * Ways to Better Cooling; Airflow, Cooler & Fan Data..*
http://www.overclock.net/t/1491876/ways-to-better-cooling-airflow-cooler-fan-data#post_22319102
OCN Dave's Air Cooling Guide
http://www.overclock.net/t/1394467/ocn-daves-air-cooling-guide

Now a disclaimer! This is all about a super silent air cooling based Workstation. You will not see any crazy watercooling stuff or super-mega gaming rig. If you are searching for those – I will have to leave you dissapointed. If you are interested in whisper quiet computing and ways to better air cooling in highly restrictive cases – then stick along, you might find some interesting stuff.
Work Horse
(8 items)
 
  
CPUMotherboardGraphicsRAM
2700K Z77 Extreme 6 Asus GTX 650 TI 2 GB Geil Black Dragon 16 GB 
Hard DriveCoolingPowerCase
Samsung 840 Evo Cryorig R1 Ultimate be quiet! L7 500W H440 New Edition (Solid Side Panel) 
  hide details  
Reply
Work Horse
(8 items)
 
  
CPUMotherboardGraphicsRAM
2700K Z77 Extreme 6 Asus GTX 650 TI 2 GB Geil Black Dragon 16 GB 
Hard DriveCoolingPowerCase
Samsung 840 Evo Cryorig R1 Ultimate be quiet! L7 500W H440 New Edition (Solid Side Panel) 
  hide details  
Reply
post #2 of 29
Thread Starter 
The search for a new case.

I am a VFX Artist – I do mainly 3D – lighting, texturing, a ton of Rendering and some compositing. I am a super silent CPU based computer enthusiast. Since most super-high-quality-production-ready render engines are fully CPU based – I have always catered more to CPUs than I was to GPUs.
While searching for a new case – I had 3, yes only 3, requirements.
1 - To fit my all my hardware and my 168 mm R1 Ultimate. Sure that is not hard enough.
2 – To be less than 23 cm fat (so thinner than my HAF 912+). I am moving quite often compared to other people and the ability to stuff the case in a variety of suitcases is a must. I had only 1 suitcase that I could fit my HAF and that is a 70x50x25 large suitcase. Gladly, the H440 fits in my smaller – 65x50x23 cm suitcase.
3 – No and absolutely no Window. No and absolutely no brushed brushed aluminium stuff – some people like it, but to me it looks cheap as hell.
Now, considering the points above, anidees AI6v2 and be quiet! Silent Base 800 immidiately fell off as contenders due to their brushed aluminium look. Same for Fractal Design Define – not only are they brushed aluminium, but they are also 23 cm wide. What about the Phanteks Enthoo Pro M? I was completely sold on the case and I was even willing to live with the brushed aluminium front and lay down some sound dampening material myself – but sadly it comes only with a window. So that leaves H440 New Edition (Windowless) and I bought one.

Now some picks of the final build. I was really hoping I could move to a 5820K and 64 or at least 32 GBs of RAM and upgrade later, but life is not always fare and I simply did not have the resources plus I need to relocate again. So I will be using my trusty old system for the foreseeable future.

Specs:
I7 2700K
Cryorig R1 Ultimate
Asrock Z77 Extreme6 - all CPU voltages taken with a multi-meter to avoid the known vCore reporting error of the E6.
4x4 Geil RAM
Asus GTX 650 Ti 2 GB - Dual Fan edition
be quiet! L7 Silver 80+ 530 Watts PSU
3 x be quiet! SW1 120mm fans
3 x be quiet! SW2 120mm fans
3 x TY147A fans
3 x Alumino 120 mm fan Filters



The H440 New Edition (Windowless) against my modded HAF 912+



The H440 stuffed with all the be quiet! goodness and some fan filters on top for the top intake. More on this later.



The system itself. The 3rd TY147a is painted in black.



Another photo of the full system.


Edited by Shneiky - 2/3/16 at 6:17am
Work Horse
(8 items)
 
  
CPUMotherboardGraphicsRAM
2700K Z77 Extreme 6 Asus GTX 650 TI 2 GB Geil Black Dragon 16 GB 
Hard DriveCoolingPowerCase
Samsung 840 Evo Cryorig R1 Ultimate be quiet! L7 500W H440 New Edition (Solid Side Panel) 
  hide details  
Reply
Work Horse
(8 items)
 
  
CPUMotherboardGraphicsRAM
2700K Z77 Extreme 6 Asus GTX 650 TI 2 GB Geil Black Dragon 16 GB 
Hard DriveCoolingPowerCase
Samsung 840 Evo Cryorig R1 Ultimate be quiet! L7 500W H440 New Edition (Solid Side Panel) 
  hide details  
Reply
post #3 of 29
Thread Starter 
0. Aesthetics - since aesthetics is quite a personal thing - I will not be making any evaluation at this point.

Have you watched Kubrik's 2001: A Space Odyssey - do you remember those black monoliths. Epic looking. The H440 reminds me of one of those. Needless to say I find the H440 New Edition (Windowless) quite the looker. Hopefully it does not sound like one of those black monoliths.

1. Build Materials – 9/10

Build materials are, mostly, excellent.

The steel is nice and thick.

The matte black paint is superb, uniform, nice feel to the touch. It does leave traces and fingerprints very easily, but they are visible only under strong light and reveal themselves as slight differences in the gloss of the surface. I will not take points off, since it is hard to see, unless under strong direct light and very easy to clean.

The sound deadening/dampening (whichever English you are coming from) is quite poor. The quality lacks compared to the ones used by be quiet! or Fractal. The main factor in the silence of the H440 is the closed design and the foam feels more cosmetic than anything, or like a marketing checkbox. I will be taking a point off here. More explanation on this later. Not the mention the damage it shipped with. There is definitely no space for that fan hub.




2. Assembly – 9/10

The assembly is quite good. I do not mind that I needed a screwdriver to take off all the thumbscrews the first time, and some of the rivets had no black pain on them. But where things went a bit worse were all the screws, specially on the fans were over-tightened. As if they are using electrical screwdrivers on the assembly line. Every screw that holds a fan has been so over-tightened that the paint has peeled off. I am taking a point off over there.



This is not the worst case, just the one easiest to take a photo off.


3. Layout – 8/10

The layout is good but it does not come without few issues.

1st – the motherboard tray is angled in. It is perfectly fine for ATX motherboards, but the new rising “skinny E-ATX” or “flex E-ATX” as I call it form factor will prove problematic. To clarify, a standart E-ATX motherboard has a size of (305 × 330 mm), modern E-ATX motherboards are (305 × 264 mm) or around that 264 mm + or – some. Asus X99 ROG board is 272 mm, X99-E WS is 267, Gigabyte X99 SOC Force is 264, EVGA X99 FTW is also 264 mm – and that is just to name a few. Top Z170 from the various Overclocking series or Extreme series also show some models with sizes of 264mm wide. Anidees Ai6v2, Phanteks Enthoo Pro M, Fractal cases and many more have similar size and can fit 264mm wide motherboard. For me it is just ridiculous to be constrained by 3 mm in a case this size, in this day and age. I will be taking off a point here.

2nd is the fan mount.

It is clearly visible it has been optimized for 120mm fans or to mount a radiator to the case and the fans to the radiator (in this case, the strips do not impact the air transfer from a 140mm that much). Those strips are bound to restrict and increase the noise of any 140mm fan mounted directly to the case as intake or exhaust. Clearly there are much better ways to arrange a fan mount, without metal strips to block air – as demonstrated by Phanteks or Corsair or many others.




Also, unless you mount 140 mm fans, the airflow produced by the 120mm is barely close to the motherboard VRMs.




I do realize the offset was made for the “so very popular” CLC and Custom Water users with thicker rads out there, but it is not something I appreciate. Cooling the VRMs will have to depend on the rear exhaust fan. For all of these points I will be taking a point off.

Another point is that you can’t efficiently mount 140mm fans with 120mm mounting holes without an adapter. Such fans I am specifically looking at are TY-147As. Truly outstanding fans at the amazing price of 10.80 EUR, which perform, if not exactly the same, as demonstrated by doyll, to their 21+ EUR Noctua equivalent.

3rd - There are holes everywhere. I don't really know their initial purpose - maybe for some NZXT LED strips. I don't really know, but they are counterproductive to the positive pressure I am trying to build here.




4th – I will not be taking a point here, I will just be an honest rant.

The cutouts for cables on the PSU cover. The ones for the SSDs could have been a bit longer, so you would be able to fit a 90 degree cable. Some grommets as well. After all – this thing costs 131 EUR.The cutout on the left side for GPU power cable is quite cool and I dig it, but I am missing a cutout on the left side or center and grommets as well. Sure, most high-end video cards have their cables near the tip, but not all of them (Fury cards with shorter PCBs for example). And a lot of mid cards still have the connector on the left or mid, such as with my case. And I can bet this configuration will continue – which poses a problem, to get a nice clean interior. I tried passing the cable through the SSD cable hole, then pass the full PSU and under the card, but it just did not work out.



5th - cable management. This is the messiest cables I ever had. The H440 uses too thick cables for the Buttons/LEDs on the top panel and the USB/Audio I/O. Also, the cables were a bit too stiff and a tad too short to get a clean tuck in.





4. The Extra – 8.25/10


4.1 Screws – 10/10

Everything you need and then some. Separated in individual bags with proper labels. Great work NZXT.

4.2 Accessoaries – 9/10

Fan hub – 10/10.

I dig it. The last straw that made me go for a case without 5,25 bays. I miss some of the freedom the NZXT Sentry Mix 2 was giving me, but with the included fan hub – I can live without missing it much.
Now the secondary PCB with the lighting stuff – I don’t dig. It just gets in my the way and can’t be disconnected. The little LED in the rear I removed since removing it allows me to nudge that 3rd Ty-147A a few mm down to better match the R1. Sure, whoever wants light – let there be light. But I miss the dissconnect option, since it is directly soldered.

4.3 Fans – 6/10

The fans are descent by budget case “stock fan” qualification, but in reality – they are nothing exceptional. They are not as bad performance / noise wise compared to the fans that ship with 60 EUR cases (like the ones with my HAF912+ 5 years ago), but the NZXT fans do have issues of their own. I took all the fans out and plugged them to my NZXT Sentry 2 controller to test them out. All of the 120 mm fans and the 140 mm fan had a very pronounced “clicking” noise coming from the bearing which was audiable through the complete RPM range. I took one of my trusty 3 year old Silent Wings 2 and one of the FN V2 fans side by side. The difference is like night and day. The be queit! fan outshines the FN V2 in all aspects. For those who are too lazy to google:

FN V2 – 1200 RPM – 45 CFM – 0.9mm H2O – 21 dBA
SW2 – 1500 RPM – 50 CFM – 1.63mm H2O – 15.7 dBA

In reality, when both set at 800 RPM – the FN V2 pushes a bit more air, but it is twice as loud to my ears. The pitch that the Silent Wings 2 produce is much more pleasant to my taste.

Now – the worst thing that a 120mm FN V2 is around 11 EUR with 2.95 shipping or 9.44 EUR with 5.90 shipping – depending one how many fans you buy – either option is viable, but for the sake of the argument I will just call it 10 EUR.

So FN V2 for 10 EUR with average specs, with a clicking Rifle Bearing and 40 000 hours life span. Now the Silent Wings 2 is a fan for 21 EUR, so comparison will be rather ridiculous. But the problem comes when I take out one of my Shadow Wings (or SW1) – it is the same blade design as SW2, the frame does not support screw mounting like the SW2, it is as well a Rifle Bearing instead of FDB, but with a life span of 200 000 hours, 1 dBA louder than SW2, but it comes at the price of 13.39 EUR with 5.90 shipping and performs almost identical to the SW2.

All in all – the FN V2 is 138 grams, and the SW1 is 220 grams. You can really feel the quality difference just by holding them.
Bottom line – H440 fans – not impressed. I would have preferred the case to come with no fans but 30 EUR cheaper or instead of an internal fan hub – to have an internal fan controller and no fans.

5. Performance – 8/10


For the full performance evaluation - see the next post.

6. Noise – 8/10

A little background on noise in my particular situation. I live in a city center which is closed for vehicles. The closest road is approx 70-80 meters away. With the occasional occurrence of a drunk student passing by – at 3 AM - the only noise producer is my computer and myself. I took a sound meter once, but it just sat there at 21 db. Regardless if the PC was on or off. Regardless if I was breathing or not. That is just the ambient noise level. 21 db is 10 db lower than the lowest threshold most reviewers use. It is also 3 times as quieter as the 30 db norm that everyone is talking about. Now I do not have Superman hearing – I only have very low ambient noise level and very sensitive ear to computer fans. I can easily distinguish between a be quiet! SW1 fan running at 600 and 800 RPM from the distance of 30 cm. So from here on – everything is based off the fact that human ears are more sensitive than any measurement equipment your Average Joe can get. Now back to the topic.

Noise was pretty mediocre at the begging. The moment when I took the stock NZXT fans and stuffed all the be quiet! goodness – it was like night and day difference. I could no longer hear the case fans themselves and I was left with the noise of the dual Cryorig XF140. Swapping those out for a trio of TY-147A and that noise disappeared as well. The H440 is does rather well to filter out sound from smaller fans – like the dual 75 mm fans I have on my Asus card. Also HDD noise was reduced to some extend, but still noticeable. Where it fails though is the filtration of sound of larger – like the XF140 fans. The XF140s at 750 RPM were just as loud in the H440 as they were in the HAF 912+. The TY-147As however were easier to tackle. The H440 allowed the 147As to hit 730 RPM before I started noticing them – up from the 620 RPM required in the HAF 912+. There is something definately going on with lower pitched/rumbling sound profiles being more resistant.

7. Price – 7/10

To be honest, for a price of 131 EUR – the H440 falls quite short. Its my own opinion that the H440 should land at 100-110 EUR to really reflect what it is worth.
Silent Base 800 can be found for 124 EUR
Fractal’s R5 can be found for 109 EUR
Anidees Ai6v2 can be found for the same 130 EUR
All of those are superior cases in performance / noise department, specially the Silent Base 800 which comes with the most superior case fans a case has ever shipped with.

Bottom Line:
avg*[avg*(Build Materials + Assembly + Layout + Extra’s) + avg*(Performance + Noise)] + Price = final performance/noise/value score

avg*[avg*(9+9+8+8.25)+avg*(8+8)]+6 + = avg[8.5625+8]+6 = avg*8.28125+7 = 7.640625

But then again - that is without factoring in the Aesthetics. As I already said - the H440 New Edition (Windowless) is a beauty. As my own personal score, I believe another .5 points are worth to be given here. Giving the H440 New Edition (Windowless) a solid 8.

In the end - am I happy with this purchase? I am. Sure, 131 EUR might be a bit on the expensive side for the H440 offers, but the sacrifices are something I am willing to make for those aesthetics.

A Few words of advice:

The H440 can't handle more than 200W-300W of heat without increasing noise significantly.
Blower style video card will do wonders in this case
Edited by Shneiky - 2/3/16 at 7:37am
Work Horse
(8 items)
 
  
CPUMotherboardGraphicsRAM
2700K Z77 Extreme 6 Asus GTX 650 TI 2 GB Geil Black Dragon 16 GB 
Hard DriveCoolingPowerCase
Samsung 840 Evo Cryorig R1 Ultimate be quiet! L7 500W H440 New Edition (Solid Side Panel) 
  hide details  
Reply
Work Horse
(8 items)
 
  
CPUMotherboardGraphicsRAM
2700K Z77 Extreme 6 Asus GTX 650 TI 2 GB Geil Black Dragon 16 GB 
Hard DriveCoolingPowerCase
Samsung 840 Evo Cryorig R1 Ultimate be quiet! L7 500W H440 New Edition (Solid Side Panel) 
  hide details  
Reply
post #4 of 29
Thread Starter 
H440 Performance.

Disclaimer: All of the renditions of the H440 were taken from NZXTs manual. I did draw some extra arrows here and there, but overall the image was created by NZXT themselves.


This is an image taken from the NZXT H440 manual:



So in theory you will assemble your system and it will follow the above airflow. I put the system together and kept the stock fans. Lets see how it fares.

For the torture test – I threw in some Prime95 (Non AVX) running MSI Kombustor in parallel. I will bump up my 4.2 GHz 2700K to 1.3 vCore to dump more heat into the case. At this clock and voltage – the CPU consumes a bit north from 100 watts. The 650TI 2GB from Asus is rated at 150 TPD, but its consumption tops out at approx 110 watts considering the benches I have seen years ago.



Stock performance was nothing short of a letdown.

The Chart does not give the full picture. I aborted the stock stest after 30 mins because the CPU hit 68C and the XF140s started ramping up. I am in no doubt that if I left the torture test go on – temps and RPMs would have risen even more. When I opened the case I was greeted by the smell of warm rubber and plastic. Nothing was burning, but I started touching around and the rubber cables as well as the plastic shroud on my R1 Ultimate were warm. This was a dead give-away that the H440 was not providing enough fresh air in it's stock configuration and the components inside were recycling hot air. Sadly I do not have any thermal probes to monitor the inside temps, sorry doyll.

Now if we were to place some exhaust fans, to prevent components from recycling heat - we will achieve something similar to:



We already have trouble getting air in. Using the top for an exhaust will give 2 issues:
1 - we still don't have enough fresh air going in
2 - the top exhaust from the top fans will find itself back into the case, since the top is so restrictive.

But the H440 does have the potential I am seeking – a quiet CPU based workstation. To remain quiet - all case fans must not work extra hard to get through the resistance the case provides. Ramping up the fans will increase noise significantly since they will be choking for air. This means we need more intake fans. Lets convert the top into an intake.



Now we have 6 fans bringing air in and 1 exhaust fan getting air out - resulting in some positive pressure. Before a backlash occurs

"Rawr! Rawr! You can't use top for intake - it is against the convention! Rawr! Hot air rises! Rawr! Everything will explode into a gazillion pieces! Rawr!" (Insert Arnold voice here). Nope - that ain't gonna happen. The heat rises convention is true for fully passive systems. A computer is not a passive system. Air goes where you push it. (wonder how a hair dryer blows even when upside down?) Air moves to equalize pressure. For a longer explanation visit OCN Dave's thread I posted earlier.




So this is what will happen. Bring air in through the front. Bring air in through the top. The top intake will provide the R1 Ultimate with fresh air. The higher pressure zone created from the top will prevent the hot air (or most of it) from the video card being sucked by the R1 Ultimate. The front pushes air in, the top pushes air in - video card hot air has nowhere to go than to escape from the back. Pressure! It is magical.

Now for the bench!
I ran exactly the same OC profile and torture test as before. This time the test continued for 1 hour and the temps were solid as opposed to still rising in the stock configuration.



Mind you - all fans were spinning at their rated 5v speeds. The SW1s at 600 RPM, the SW2s at 800 RPM, the NZXT 140mm stock in the rear at 800 RPM and the R1's XF 140s at 750 rpm.

Now for the finishing move I will remove the dual XF140s and the rear stock NZXT 140 mm and will place triple TY-147A. I will also bring back my 4.2 GHz 1.21 vCore OC profile and will run P95 but this time with AVX. The TYs were put at a constant 630 RPM to match my old test in the HAF912+. Mind you, I did not re-seat the R1 from my move to the H440 to keep things consistent.

P95 AVX, 4.2GHz 1.21 vCore, 19C ambient temp
HAF 912+: Hottest CPU core : 59C
H440: Hottest CPU core: 62C

Not too bad. Only 3C difference.

So - were the 131 EUR H440 + 50 EUR for a 3rd Ty-147A, 3rd SW2 120mm, 3 fan filters and a PWM spliter worth it performance wise? Definitely not, but don't tell that to anyone. Specially considering that I could have gotten a 32 GB RAM kit for that sum. But hey, we are enthusiasts, not everything we do makes sense. Also, now I can enjoy the awesome black-shape of the H440 on my desk. In the end - I don't regret anything. (Until I start a new project, and my 4x4 RAM is not enough!)
Edited by Shneiky - 3/21/16 at 2:57pm
Work Horse
(8 items)
 
  
CPUMotherboardGraphicsRAM
2700K Z77 Extreme 6 Asus GTX 650 TI 2 GB Geil Black Dragon 16 GB 
Hard DriveCoolingPowerCase
Samsung 840 Evo Cryorig R1 Ultimate be quiet! L7 500W H440 New Edition (Solid Side Panel) 
  hide details  
Reply
Work Horse
(8 items)
 
  
CPUMotherboardGraphicsRAM
2700K Z77 Extreme 6 Asus GTX 650 TI 2 GB Geil Black Dragon 16 GB 
Hard DriveCoolingPowerCase
Samsung 840 Evo Cryorig R1 Ultimate be quiet! L7 500W H440 New Edition (Solid Side Panel) 
  hide details  
Reply
post #5 of 29
Thread Starter 
Any comments and critiques are welcomed. Also, I will try to answer any questions if I can.
Work Horse
(8 items)
 
  
CPUMotherboardGraphicsRAM
2700K Z77 Extreme 6 Asus GTX 650 TI 2 GB Geil Black Dragon 16 GB 
Hard DriveCoolingPowerCase
Samsung 840 Evo Cryorig R1 Ultimate be quiet! L7 500W H440 New Edition (Solid Side Panel) 
  hide details  
Reply
Work Horse
(8 items)
 
  
CPUMotherboardGraphicsRAM
2700K Z77 Extreme 6 Asus GTX 650 TI 2 GB Geil Black Dragon 16 GB 
Hard DriveCoolingPowerCase
Samsung 840 Evo Cryorig R1 Ultimate be quiet! L7 500W H440 New Edition (Solid Side Panel) 
  hide details  
Reply
post #6 of 29
Excellent post! Super detailed, thank you very much!

Would you recommend something like nf-p12 for the intakes? Since they're pressure point fans?
post #7 of 29
Thread Starter 
One of the reasons why I am using be quiet! fans is that they are neither pressure nor airflow fans. They are middle of the road on both aspects - similar to the Gentle Typhoons - which became ever so popular due to their wide adaptability.

If you can live with the price and colors and noise profile of the Noctuas - then they will be even better choice. Though for me, the Noctuas are too expensive, the colors are horrible and their sound profile is not my favorite.

Regardless, running fans at high rpm will be counter productive. The small opening on the H440 will not allow for much air in - regardless of the pressure produced by the fans. Running fans at, lets say 2000 RPM will increase the noise significantly while not increasing the airflow as much as you would hope. The fans will be chocking. This is one of the reasons I went with 6 intakes at low RPM to compensate for the design of the H440.
Edited by Shneiky - 2/4/16 at 4:21am
Work Horse
(8 items)
 
  
CPUMotherboardGraphicsRAM
2700K Z77 Extreme 6 Asus GTX 650 TI 2 GB Geil Black Dragon 16 GB 
Hard DriveCoolingPowerCase
Samsung 840 Evo Cryorig R1 Ultimate be quiet! L7 500W H440 New Edition (Solid Side Panel) 
  hide details  
Reply
Work Horse
(8 items)
 
  
CPUMotherboardGraphicsRAM
2700K Z77 Extreme 6 Asus GTX 650 TI 2 GB Geil Black Dragon 16 GB 
Hard DriveCoolingPowerCase
Samsung 840 Evo Cryorig R1 Ultimate be quiet! L7 500W H440 New Edition (Solid Side Panel) 
  hide details  
Reply
post #8 of 29
Quote:
Originally Posted by Shneiky View Post




Now we have 6 fans bringing air in and 1 exhaust fan getting air out - resulting in some positive pressure. Before a backlash occurs

"Rawr! Rawr! You can't use top for intake - it is against the convention! Rawr! Hot air rises! Rawr! Everything will explode into a gazillion pieces! Rawr!" (Insert Arnold voice here). Nope - that ain't gonna happen. The heat rises convention is true for fully passive systems. A computer is not a passive system. Air goes where you push it. (wonder how a hair dryer blows even when upside down?) Air moves to equalize pressure.

Rawr! Rawr! You can't use top for intake - it is against the convention! tongue.gif Seriously, though, can this be done, really?! I'm kinda worried about 2 things:

1) When you're pressing down (intake) air from the top, so close to the CPU air cooler (with a typical right-to-left fan flow direction, aren't you going to create a flow interference, causing your CPU fans to become unbalanced? (Over time)

2) By pressing down the top-intake air, aren't you effectively pushing away the air again that was just about to be exhausted?!

On the latter, I wonder if it were perhaps better to only use 2 top in-take fans?! (As in: remove the one closest to the rear exhaust fan). So as to create a downward flow, at the middle and front side of the case, which can than make a 'U-turn' when it hits bottom, towards the upper exhaust fan at the rear, where it can exit unhindered by another top fan pressing it down!?

Mind you, I loved you review! And I'm not pretending to know better: just trying to figure out how to get this case cooler. Incidentally, did they say the H440 New Edition had solved the 'starved' air intake on the front?! Apparently not.

Thanks.
post #9 of 29
Thanks for all the great info above! Staying subbed to this thread as i have this case and am always on the hunt for better temps biggrin.gif
6 Years Later
(13 items)
 
My First Build :P
(15 items)
 
 
CPUMotherboardGraphicsRAM
i5 6600k @ 4.6 MSI Z170A Gaming M7 Evga 1070 SC Corsair Vengence Ddr4 3000 32GB 
Hard DriveCoolingOSMonitor
Samsung 950 Pro 256Gb EK  Windows 10 Pro 64Bit LG 29UM67P 
KeyboardPowerCaseMouse
Corsair Strafe Evga Supernova 650 G2 Nzxt H440 SteelSeries Rival 700 
Mouse Pad
Razer Golitahus 
CPUMotherboardGraphicsRAM
i7-920 bloomfield (4.4GHz) Asus P6T Delux V2 LGA1366 Sapphire 6870 (liquid) Corsair XMS3&GSkill 12GB DDR3 
Hard DriveCoolingOSMonitor
OCZ Vertex 2 60gb + WD Caviar Black 1TB Rasa 240 MS Win7 Pro 64bit Acer H2332H + 32" Vizio 
KeyboardPowerCaseMouse
Saitek Eclipse II Thermaltake Toughpower 1200w CoolerMaster Haf932 Logitech G9x 
Mouse PadAudio
Razer Goliathus Creative XFi Sound Blaster Titanium 
  hide details  
Reply
6 Years Later
(13 items)
 
My First Build :P
(15 items)
 
 
CPUMotherboardGraphicsRAM
i5 6600k @ 4.6 MSI Z170A Gaming M7 Evga 1070 SC Corsair Vengence Ddr4 3000 32GB 
Hard DriveCoolingOSMonitor
Samsung 950 Pro 256Gb EK  Windows 10 Pro 64Bit LG 29UM67P 
KeyboardPowerCaseMouse
Corsair Strafe Evga Supernova 650 G2 Nzxt H440 SteelSeries Rival 700 
Mouse Pad
Razer Golitahus 
CPUMotherboardGraphicsRAM
i7-920 bloomfield (4.4GHz) Asus P6T Delux V2 LGA1366 Sapphire 6870 (liquid) Corsair XMS3&GSkill 12GB DDR3 
Hard DriveCoolingOSMonitor
OCZ Vertex 2 60gb + WD Caviar Black 1TB Rasa 240 MS Win7 Pro 64bit Acer H2332H + 32" Vizio 
KeyboardPowerCaseMouse
Saitek Eclipse II Thermaltake Toughpower 1200w CoolerMaster Haf932 Logitech G9x 
Mouse PadAudio
Razer Goliathus Creative XFi Sound Blaster Titanium 
  hide details  
Reply
post #10 of 29
Quote:
Originally Posted by meimeiriver View Post

Rawr! Rawr! You can't use top for intake - it is against the convention! tongue.gif Seriously, though, can this be done, really?! I'm kinda worried about 2 things:

1) When you're pressing down (intake) air from the top, so close to the CPU air cooler (with a typical right-to-left fan flow direction, aren't you going to create a flow interference, causing your CPU fans to become unbalanced? (Over time)

2) By pressing down the top-intake air, aren't you effectively pushing away the air again that was just about to be exhausted?!

On the latter, I wonder if it were perhaps better to only use 2 top in-take fans?! (As in: remove the one closest to the rear exhaust fan). So as to create a downward flow, at the middle and front side of the case, which can than make a 'U-turn' when it hits bottom, towards the upper exhaust fan at the rear, where it can exit unhindered by another top fan pressing it down!?

Mind you, I loved you review! And I'm not pretending to know better: just trying to figure out how to get this case cooler. Incidentally, did they say the H440 New Edition had solved the 'starved' air intake on the front?! Apparently not.

Thanks.
1) The cooler and flow directs are valid points. Sorry, the unbalancing thing is .. well .. unbalanced. tongue.gif

2) Correct! Give that man (or woman) a cigar!

Motherboard orientation with rear connections using air cooling means front to back airflow is best. Cases with top vents are somewhere between total waste and just plain stupid!. The cause front to back airflow to move upward, which means heated exhaust off of GPU moves up around CPU cooler. Not a good idea.

Ideally we want nothing but front to back airflow with back having as much or more vent area than front. Only real exception is maybe bottom intake flow directly toward GPU intakes and maybe the back top vent helping flow heat air out of case.

Another big problem with many cases is not having an intake directly in front of CPU .. but instead having 3x 5.25 optical bays. doh.gif Luckily these 3x bays make a near perfect place to set an additional intake fan. Some of the stock 5.25 covers are even grills!
New Posts  All Forums:Forum Nav:
  Return Home
  Back to Forum: Air Cooling
Overclock.net › Forums › Cooling › Air Cooling › Cooling techniques in highly restrictive/silent cases + H440 New Edition Review.