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Difficult SSD Install turns into nightmare or "The Christmas that Technology Stole"

post #1 of 4
Thread Starter 
First - Thanks in advance.

Background - for your amusement (skip to ISSUE if not amused by novice)
This started when the WIN10 upgrade diagnosis program determined the old Home HP desktop would support because of integrated graphics card... funny, a few months later and it was resolved and is now the machine I'm using to send the message because the new machine now broke hard. The end goal was to establish a solid Home desktop hub of a 4 home Win10 computers & 5 Window phones with Win accounts monitored on a Family Plan.
So, I found a solid machine at Costco: Lenovo H50.05 with Intel i7 processor, 12GB Ram, 1TB Samsung HD, 2GB NVDIA gpu for $599.
Since I was getting a "fresh" start, I thought I'd also configure the machine with a SSD. I bought the Samsung 850EVO 250GB.
From the begining, I ran into issues. Unknown to me, the initial WIN10 on the machine had missed the big NOV15 update and it didn't do it on initiation. On day 2, I mirrored my SSD as per Samsung instructions via provided Navigator & Migration. Then started plodding the copy/install of all other programs from the old machine. I was immediately challenged by File Manager moving like a snail, which after hours with Microsoft Agents, we identified the Win version issue. I started over... there's been many more issues - among them, learning how Microsoft doesn't allow the BOOT partition to move with mirroring. WIN10 just isn't ready for prime time. Trying to establish multi-user accounts across the platform is a mess... and me working across 64bit and 32bit machines added complexity....
Then last week, after several weeks of smooth operations (except for some internal WIN10 issues) I began to loose Internet and Network connectivity - "Network protocols missing" and "Windows Sockets registry missing" noticed in printing to a HP wireless printer config. So, I tried to restore/fix the registry issue by diagnosis tools - no good - then WIN10 ISO re-install. (I had a restore/backup point, but it would have meant loosing apps and '15 tax prep work. I thought restoring the registry could run without overwriting files) The restore stopped. I continued working on taxes several hours. Went to bed. The next day, the machine booted off the HDD drive and had restored back a month. UGH! Since then, I restored both drives back to default. So let's start from there.

ISSUE:
I tried to mirror my new WIN10 machines HDD with Samsungs Navigator/Migration tools to the 850EVO SSD. I first battled with Secure Erase program to restore the SSD to original state. I made a boot thumbdrive using Navigator, but didn't know I'd need to default to the DOS tool which was absolutely unreadable.
I eventually got both drives replicated, but the HDD remained the default BOOT drive C: The SSD kept defaulting to G: healthy partition drive. Unplugging the HDD, I achieved a couple of good starts on the SSD and it had defaulted to C: Boot/Healthy Partition. One iteration, I plugged the HDD back in and it remained the secondary drive while the SSD remained as BOOT. But, upon restart, the HDD again defaulted to BOOT. I realize this may be in the BIOS, where I've played with the CSM, UEFI/LEGENDARY configurations - but I can't figure it out.
I finally "went for it". I Wiped the HDD. Upon start - with HDD unpluged or plugged in, the computer is now broke hard with Error Codes: 0xc0000001 and NTFS_File.System. The WIN10 Recovery Disc I made helped boot once on the SSD. Now, I can't get the machine running. ON the SSD - I get "no OS" on the black screen. On the Recovery Disc - I get to the recovery tools, but they can't restore.

Any ideas..
...

Disgruntled Dad - CigarXO
post #2 of 4
I think honestly your problem is Windows 10 and not the SSD itself.

Some things that can help:

  • Your BIOS/UEFI configuration options may let you indicate that the Samsung is an SSD, and that you are using AHCI mode. (My ASRock Z97 board has such an option)
  • A true clean install of Windows 10, leaving your network cable disconnected, until you've gotten all your drivers on (most critically the Samsung SSD driver) and are ready to begin the updates.
  • Only selectively importing registry settings instead of the whole thing (importing the whole thing will include cruft like leftover hardware enumerations, etc) - and then, only if you have to instead of letting applications set the registry up during installation, etc.

As a final resort I suggest using Windows 7, TBH.

You may also want to look at locking down Win10 so the OS doesn't 'leak' as much info to Microsoft.

[ EDIT:
  • One other thing I've noticed is that you've been messing about with CSM, etc settings - try to avoid doing that unless you know what they do. Your manufacturer's recommended default setting should normally be followed for the CSM and whatever "Legendary" is.
  • Secondly, the fact that your drive letters keep changing tell me you're trying to install your OS with multiple drives connected during the install phase. That's always a recipe for disaster, because you can accidentally hit the wrong drive to set up on in the configuration and you won't even realize it until you've already blown away your partitions. In addition, if you have multiple drives connected to your system, Windows may occasionally "spread out" the hidden Volume Shadow Copy information partition across the multiple drives. Now, you already have a formatted drive and a new SSD and you've had them both plugged in, apparently, during install. I have no idea if this means Win10 has been trying to replace or update Volume Shadow Copy info on a drive that already has it, but again as I said having multiple drives connected during the OS installation phase is not a good idea simply because it's possible to make mistakes.
]
Edited by Quantum Reality - 2/7/16 at 8:18am
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4690K System
(12 items)
 
HTPC
(9 items)
 
HP dv6 laptop
(13 items)
 
CPUMotherboardGraphicsRAM
Core i5 4690K ASRock Z97 Extreme4 XFX Radeon 7950 32 GB DDR3-2133 
Hard DriveOptical DriveCoolingOS
Samsung 850 EVO SSD Samsung DVD/CD-writer Corsair Hydro H60 Windows 7 
MonitorMonitorPowerCase
ASUS PA248Q Dell U2412M XFX 850W Black Edition XXX Fractal Design Arc Midi 2 
CPUMotherboardGraphicsRAM
Pentium Dual Core E6700 MSI G41M-P33 Combo ATI HD4350 Kingston ValueRAM DDR3-1333 
RAMHard DriveOSMonitor
Kingston ValueRAM DDR3-1333 WD Caviar Blue Windows 7 64-bit Sony 32" TV set 
Case
Apex TX-381 
CPUGraphicsRAMHard Drive
Core i5 430M GT230M (1 Gb dedicated) 8 GB DDR3-1066 640 GB 
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Windows 7 Home Premium (64-bit) 15.6" 
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post #3 of 4
Thread Starter 
QR - thanks for jumping into the pool with me - you are a brave contributor. Let me respond and update - then let's continue:

1. I was in BIOS/UEFI because I couldn't get the boot sequence to utilize the repair disk and change the SSD to boot drive. I've been working across 4 home machines and each has different BIOS assignments and BIOS designs. I liked the old Boot list and manual arrangement. I don't/didn't know what the boot order is under UEFI: flash drive, DVD, SSD, HDD? So you are right, I'd be better not to mess around there, but I was unable to get the sequencing I needed. With HDD plugged-in, it quick booted past recovery drive. If I unpluged HDD, I got "no OS" error. When I changed the BIOS - I seemed to engage DVD/restore disk. Then unplugging HDD, I got successful boot off the WIN10 recovery disk and it established the SSD as C: (Boot, Primary Part). Only later to have HDD re-prioritized as BOOT drive - some of that "shadow" magic Microsoft has bugged WIN OS with. Finally, I thought I had the sequence down with SSD as C:Boot, and HDD as D:data, so I wiped D: ---- only to kill the machine hard. Booting only to System Recovery Menu - but those all failed. Return to OS gave "no OS"... I thought I was dead in the water last night.

Editorial comment: I don't do this regularly and frankly don't think a consumer should have to... the old analogy - I just want to tell time, not build the clock - fits me well. My effort was going to be bringing 4 home machines to WIN10 standards, building user accounts on Microsoft account platform and connecting 5 new family phones allowing music (Groove) and parental control. that's enough vudoo for one dad.

2. I wasn't doing a Clean Install because I got one OS pre-installed on machine. And old machine WIN7 upgrade must have been an Enterprise or HomeUser (Army) upgrade because the License #s didn't allow me to build a full media download. And finally, I didn't know the Samsung Migrator program wouldn't copy the Boot sys.

3. Then last week after the WIN10 or HP printer started corrupting my Network/Internet connection via Protocol/Registry errors, I did try to WIN10 .ISO reinstall to clean-up. That not working, I tried to SecureErase the SSD with Samsung's provided program. That led to a DOS command line and UI that was unreadable.

So, that's where you found me when I wrote this thread. Here's the update -

1. I restored BIOS/UEFI to "default settings".

2. I did manage to get a WIN10 Media DVD made off another home machine.

3. I installed WIN10 on SSD and all updates.

4. I connected HDD - and the disc went through a Disc Restore iteration on start which repartitioned, and probably "shadow" stored OEM and recovery OS. For now, the SSD is the BOOT. _ BUT, I've stopped here because I don't know if that will last???

5. The HDD (D:) is giving an "Access Denied" error. I've tried to change Ownership, Permissions and Sharing to allow my Administrator profile to work with/access ???

If you can guide me from here to establish correct initial profile: SSD as Boot/OS drive. HDD as data storage drive.

I then found this site because I was going to go to my original modification plan when I first installed the SSD of moving the User files to D: as depicted in http://www.overclock.net/t/664738/how-to-setup-ssd-boot-drive-with-secondary-hard-disc-optimization

Thanks so much!

CigarXO - tired Dad with 3 daughters still wanting music on their WIN Phones? redface.gif
post #4 of 4
Honestly, you'll have better luck using Robocopy in an Administrator-level CMD window to blow past the ACLs on your hard drive and copy the files to your SSD or a USB drive, or a different directory on your hard drive. Be aware that a known weirdity with Robocopy is that it may set the hidden attribute on the destination folder.

You will probably want to try something like ROBOCOPY [source] [destination] /R:1 /E /B /XF desktop.ini /XJD

You can use the /L switch at the end to "test" if the robocopy will actually work the way you think it does.

I've used this method myself to yank files off a Windows 7 hard drive onto a storage drive and in doing so basically blow away the take ownership problem, since robocopy can be made to ignore it (to an extent) and the destination files are given new ownership automatically.
4690K System
(12 items)
 
HTPC
(9 items)
 
HP dv6 laptop
(13 items)
 
CPUMotherboardGraphicsRAM
Core i5 4690K ASRock Z97 Extreme4 XFX Radeon 7950 32 GB DDR3-2133 
Hard DriveOptical DriveCoolingOS
Samsung 850 EVO SSD Samsung DVD/CD-writer Corsair Hydro H60 Windows 7 
MonitorMonitorPowerCase
ASUS PA248Q Dell U2412M XFX 850W Black Edition XXX Fractal Design Arc Midi 2 
CPUMotherboardGraphicsRAM
Pentium Dual Core E6700 MSI G41M-P33 Combo ATI HD4350 Kingston ValueRAM DDR3-1333 
RAMHard DriveOSMonitor
Kingston ValueRAM DDR3-1333 WD Caviar Blue Windows 7 64-bit Sony 32" TV set 
Case
Apex TX-381 
CPUGraphicsRAMHard Drive
Core i5 430M GT230M (1 Gb dedicated) 8 GB DDR3-1066 640 GB 
OSMonitor
Windows 7 Home Premium (64-bit) 15.6" 
  hide details  
Reply
4690K System
(12 items)
 
HTPC
(9 items)
 
HP dv6 laptop
(13 items)
 
CPUMotherboardGraphicsRAM
Core i5 4690K ASRock Z97 Extreme4 XFX Radeon 7950 32 GB DDR3-2133 
Hard DriveOptical DriveCoolingOS
Samsung 850 EVO SSD Samsung DVD/CD-writer Corsair Hydro H60 Windows 7 
MonitorMonitorPowerCase
ASUS PA248Q Dell U2412M XFX 850W Black Edition XXX Fractal Design Arc Midi 2 
CPUMotherboardGraphicsRAM
Pentium Dual Core E6700 MSI G41M-P33 Combo ATI HD4350 Kingston ValueRAM DDR3-1333 
RAMHard DriveOSMonitor
Kingston ValueRAM DDR3-1333 WD Caviar Blue Windows 7 64-bit Sony 32" TV set 
Case
Apex TX-381 
CPUGraphicsRAMHard Drive
Core i5 430M GT230M (1 Gb dedicated) 8 GB DDR3-1066 640 GB 
OSMonitor
Windows 7 Home Premium (64-bit) 15.6" 
  hide details  
Reply
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