post #11 of 11
Sure, there are basically two ways of doing it for a home network, the easiest is editing the hosts file, which is covered in length for Windows and also common to Linux systems (/etc/hosts). Host files are practical mainly for blacklisting domains you will never want resolved. When your browser requests the IP address for such a domain (in order to connect to it), the OS first looks at the hosts file and if it finds a definition in there it returns that IP instead of the real IP that your regular DNS server would otherwise return. A few host lists are available publicly and typically they just cover ad and malware domains, resolving them all to 127.0.0.1, where it's presumed there's no web server running so those requests will just time out. So that's the easiest way of doing it, though I've heard rumours that Win 10 will override changes made to block certain domains but I'm not sure whether that's true or just myth.

The other way to sinkhole domains is to set up a local DNS server (Raspberry Pi can handle this job nicely) and bring control of it into your home network. This is in case you don't trust your ISP to resolve domains properly (regional blocking) and instead of using the ISP's DNS server you can fetch data from a third-party DNS server and cache the IPs locally. The added benefit of a local DNS server instead of just a host file is that domains you access will be cached so in the future when you request them, that request doesn't have to leave your home network, it's just a quick roundtrip between your DNS server and your main computer and you have an IP with which you can connect directly to the resources you want.
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Black & Green
(12 items)
 
Dev Box
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CPUMotherboardRAMHard Drive
Core2 Duo E7400 Asus P5Q Hyper-X  Sandisk 
OSPower
Fedora 22 Thermaltake 650W 
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