Overclock.net › Forums › Components › Monitors and Displays › [Official] ASUS RoG Swift PG348Q Owners Club
New Posts  All Forums:Forum Nav:

[Official] ASUS RoG Swift PG348Q Owners Club - Page 199

post #1981 of 3504
I think also depends of the viewing angle. If you watch a corner with IPS bleed in front of him, you can't see anything.. This is the tecnology at this days (sorry for my english)

TFT central on Acer x34:
"This is common on most modern IPS-type panels and can be distracting to some users. If you view dark content from a normal head-on viewing position, you can actually see this glow as your eyes look towards the edges of the screen. Because of the sheer horizontal size of this 34" panel, the glow towards the edges is more obvious than on small screens, where there isn't such a long distance from your central position to the edges. Some people may find this problematic if they are working with a lot of dark content or solid colour patterns. In normal day to day uses, office work, movies and games you couldn't really notice this unless you were viewing darker content. If you move your viewing position back, which is probably likely for movies and games, the effect reduces as you do not have such an extreme angle from your eye position to the screen edges. The glow effect was a little less than on flat 34" ultra-wide screens as the curved nature created a smaller angle between your eyes and the edges of the screen"

[EDIT:] And:

We want to make a point at this stage relating to IPS glow. The above image shows the corners of the screen as observed from a central viewing position, at a normal viewing distance of a couple of feet from the screen. As you look towards the corners of the screen you can see a glow and pale areas on the dark content. This is not backlight bleed! We see many reports of users who mistake IPS glow which is a panel characteristic, for backlight bleed which is a build quality issue. This glow in the corners is caused by your angle of vision when viewing the screen and is because of the pixel structure on the IPS panel. If you view the screen from even wider angles (like the image shown above it) the glow becomes more white and pale. This IPS glow is a "feature" of nearly every IPS-type panel on the market, so as a buyer you should be expecting it
Edited by TheF0x - 6/29/16 at 4:37pm
post #1982 of 3504
This is what i see on my PG348Q.. ( + or - )

IMG_5198.JPG 1028k .JPG file

And this is the same photo overexpsosed:

IMG_5187.JPG 2534k .JPG file
post #1983 of 3504
Quote:
Originally Posted by TheLastUs View Post

Clearly people here don't understand how this technology works. Even if there is "some with little to no blb" it will get backlight bleed over time and depending on how often/how the screen is used. You keep having fun rolling the dice, it's not going to get any better. Write back on monitor #20. If there are some that :"have a lot" the tendency for them to have MORE than that decreases. We know. We have done studies on this.

P.S. I looked at the pictures, arguable whether or not anyone is even taking pictures properly or having correct sensitivity to deem it "no blb" The proof is in the actual pudding. Unless you yourself have seen one in person with "little to no blb" then you're just a fool running around in a circle.

I know how we process it when it comes in for RMA. It's not going to be any different. What's acceptable to us isn't acceptable to you. Simple as that. Keep on playing roulette. tongue.gif But do remember me when you give up and ask for your money back. Too bad you won't be able to ask for all the time you wasted back. Time is also money you won't get back.

I don't mind the time, as long as scummy companies that don't care about the customer and can't even be bothered to do proper quality control don't get a dime from us.

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=mje_fmayu0k
post #1984 of 3504
Quote:
Originally Posted by MCFC View Post

I don't mind the time, as long as scummy companies that don't care about the customer and can't even be bothered to do proper quality control don't get a dime from us.

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=mje_fmayu0k

It's not a matter of "scummy" it's a matter of the type of technology you are expecting standards from. IPS screens just aren't there yet. Comparing screens etc to see which one has little bleed is pointless given that with enough time and use - screen bleeding WILL happen within 1 year of the laptop's use anyways. And if you're gonna switch it out for a newer one, what does it matter in 1 years time anyways? Just anal customers expecting perfection clearly deluded in a world where no such thing exists.

It's actually not a problem of quality control. People who are not in the business but are just consumers without any education on how LCD screens are REALLY put together will never understand it. One cannot "quality control" this issue or it does not become profitable. One can only expect margins of error and acceptable margins of error. A lot of the bleeds seen in this thread by the industry are considered acceptable because a majority of the use is not ON pitch black scenes.

You won't convince anyone about this, especially ASUS. Also you may want to prevent sending it back to RMA enough. We do have an internal system with "problem customers" and end up flagging them as difficult customers. All you'll end up doing is getting yourself on a list where ASUS won't take any future requests from you seriously.

Edit: if you do want to attempt to return 15 in a row - do it retail. That's the only way.
Edited by TheLastUs - 6/29/16 at 5:36pm
post #1985 of 3504
Quote:
Originally Posted by TheF0x View Post

This is what i see on my PG348Q.. ( + or - )

IMG_5198.JPG 1028k .JPG file

And this is the same photo overexpsosed:

IMG_5187.JPG 2534k .JPG file

This is a very good monitor situation. I would keep it. Or you can always play what I call Futile IPS Roulette like MCFC and just face the same results nearly every time
post #1986 of 3504
Thread Starter 
Quote:
Originally Posted by TheLastUs View Post

It's not a matter of "scummy" it's a matter of the type of technology you are expecting standards from. IPS screens just aren't there yet. Comparing screens etc to see which one has little bleed is pointless given that with enough time and use - screen bleeding WILL happen within 1 year of the laptop's use anyways. And if you're gonna switch it out for a newer one, what does it matter in 1 years time anyways? Just anal customers expecting perfection clearly deluded in a world where no such thing exists.

It's actually not a problem of quality control. People who are not in the business but are just consumers without any education on how LCD screens are REALLY put together will never understand it. One cannot "quality control" this issue or it does not become profitable. One can only expect margins of error and acceptable margins of error. A lot of the bleeds seen in this thread by the industry are considered acceptable because a majority of the use is not ON pitch black scenes.

You won't convince anyone about this, especially ASUS. Also you may want to prevent sending it back to RMA enough. We do have an internal system with "problem customers" and end up flagging them as difficult customers. All you'll end up doing is getting yourself on a list where ASUS won't take any future requests from you seriously.

Edit: if you do want to attempt to return 15 in a row - do it retail. That's the only way.

Just being curious, there have been quite a few complaints about certain monitors like the PG279Q and some on the PG348Q, however I do not personally think that it is in a bad situation. Did you ever think that QC was bad on some monitors when you received them from people doing an RMA and do they actually take notice to try and fix the problem

What product did you notice had the worst QC when you were working

Thanks for your time smile.gif
post #1987 of 3504
Quote:
Originally Posted by Metros View Post

Just being curious, there have been quite a few complaints about certain monitors like the PG279Q and some on the PG348Q, however I do not personally think that it is in a bad situation. Did you ever think that QC was bad on some monitors when you received them from people doing an RMA and do they actually take notice to try and fix the problem

What product did you notice had the worst QC when you were working

Thanks for your time smile.gif

Well as I said, LCD technology is flawed and prone to errors starting in manufacturing. It's not even a perfect science by any means. No one can honestly say "Do this, this and this and you won't have backlight bleed!" in the original engineering of these technologies. It simply doesn't work that way and it's very apparent the monitor makers do not have control over bleed any more than we have control over half-lives of certain kinds of bacteria. It's simply the nature of the technology...so the words "quality control" do not apply. It's not a quality control issue, it's purely a LCD technology issue. Not all crystals are created equal even by the same manufacturing process.

There's NOTHING to fix. Because the way they see it - a majority of the time and even video game scenes are not PITCH DARK. Just the way it is.

Again, it's very apparent no one on this thread has an engineering degree let alone application in this industry to understand what I'm saying. The general consensus is "durr, backlight bleed..keep sending till I gets what I want, George!"

They don't understand the futility of it.

Worst QC has been laptop inverter units for screens or batteries. Can't name a specific one
post #1988 of 3504
Thread Starter 
Quote:
Originally Posted by TheLastUs View Post

Well as I said, LCD technology is flawed and prone to errors starting in manufacturing. It's not even a perfect science by any means. No one can honestly say "Do this, this and this and you won't have backlight bleed!" in the original engineering of these technologies. It simply doesn't work that way and it's very apparent the monitor makers do not have control over bleed any more than we have control over half-lives of certain kinds of bacteria. It's simply the nature of the technology...so the words "quality control" do not apply. It's not a quality control issue, it's purely a LCD technology issue. Not all crystals are created equal even by the same manufacturing process.

There's NOTHING to fix. Because the way they see it - a majority of the time and even video game scenes are not PITCH DARK. Just the way it is.

Again, it's very apparent no one on this thread has an engineering degree let alone application in this industry to understand what I'm saying. The general consensus is "durr, backlight bleed..keep sending till I gets what I want, George!"

They don't understand the futility of it.

Worst QC has been laptop inverter units for screens or batteries. Can't name a specific one

I was not stating anything to do with backlight bleed or IPS glow, I was talking about other issues
post #1989 of 3504
Quote:
Originally Posted by TheLastUs View Post

It's not a matter of "scummy" it's a matter of the type of technology you are expecting standards from. IPS screens just aren't there yet. Comparing screens etc to see which one has little bleed is pointless given that with enough time and use - screen bleeding WILL happen within 1 year of the laptop's use anyways. And if you're gonna switch it out for a newer one, what does it matter in 1 years time anyways? Just anal customers expecting perfection clearly deluded in a world where no such thing exists.

It's actually not a problem of quality control. People who are not in the business but are just consumers without any education on how LCD screens are REALLY put together will never understand it. One cannot "quality control" this issue or it does not become profitable. One can only expect margins of error and acceptable margins of error. A lot of the bleeds seen in this thread by the industry are considered acceptable because a majority of the use is not ON pitch black scenes.

You won't convince anyone about this, especially ASUS. Also you may want to prevent sending it back to RMA enough. We do have an internal system with "problem customers" and end up flagging them as difficult customers. All you'll end up doing is getting yourself on a list where ASUS won't take any future requests from you seriously.

Edit: if you do want to attempt to return 15 in a row - do it retail. That's the only way.

Thankfully I live in a country where consumers have a lot of rights so either asus (and other scummy manufacturers) improve or keep getting their displays back.
I know it's not the same in other countries which frankly is disgusting but what can you do.
post #1990 of 3504
Quote:
Originally Posted by TheLastUs View Post

I usually never post here but had to chime in.

I think a lot of you are simply unfamiliar with IPS technology. I see people playing the IPS Roulette game hoping for a better panel that is perfect in every way..no light bleed that is noticeable....and no defect. At the RMA department, people have a laugh at someone returning their monitor nearly 4+ times trying. You guys aren't the only ones. They eventually give up. Let me say to you all - as a former Tech Engineer for ASUS RMA in the City of Industry - you all aren't going to find that perfect IPS.

Ever.

IPS technology is flawed and even if a perfect panel comes out of the distribution/assembly line, it's more than likely humidity, carrying, pixel density, backlight intensity rfa factor, USAGE over TIME, etc. will all contribute to backlight bleed eventually. No one on earth (at least that's where my money is) has a perfect monitor with NO backlight bleeds at least to some noticeable extent in dark scenes.

You simply won't find it. Now...I saw some pictures of backlight bleed here and I hate to say this: IT'S THE NORM out of hundreds of thousands of units shipped. We're talking maybe 10/200,000 may have minor bleed on the top or bottom and even then it will be noticeable! The rest? Well you get glows like this, striation bleeds, etc. It's all different types for the same annoying condition. You can get one that doesn't have disco-light bleed ...but more than likely it's either a matter of time it will develop (that's right) light bleed or it will have light bleed at some other place on the monitor which is inconvenient or may have a harsher color, etc.

The truth is you have to either learn to live with it, or play this roulette game and try your luck at one that may be SLIGHTLY better. Can you find one that is REALLY good in comparison? Probably a very low chance you'll find one that has no backlight bleeds and maybe a bit here or there on the top and OFF CENTER.

If you have backlight bleed off-center and on the top left...top right...KEEP IT. Otherwise you'll get the ones that bleed heavily on the bottom.

Trying to get one with no bleeds that are noticeable? Forget it. Save yourself the time, money, and frustration with false hope. Give up and wait for these monitors to hit OLED status.

Think of the odds when you play IPS Roulette. You'd have a better chance at Vegas.


There's one problem I have with your "expert" piece here... If backlight bleed is inherent to this technology as you say, why do manufacturers and retailers consider it to be a defect? Why is this not clarified by anyone as something to expect when buying a product of this nature to avoid these repeat RMA claims and forum threads? Why have I had several IPS monitors before which exhibit none of these issues aside from the higher end gaming monitors from Acer/ASUS?
Edited by usrockband - 6/30/16 at 7:20am
New Posts  All Forums:Forum Nav:
  Return Home
  Back to Forum: Monitors and Displays
Overclock.net › Forums › Components › Monitors and Displays › [Official] ASUS RoG Swift PG348Q Owners Club