Overclock.net › Forums › Intel › Intel - General › Xeon Hacking and Overclocking X79/X99 [Beyond X58]
New Posts  All Forums:Forum Nav:

Xeon Hacking and Overclocking X79/X99 [Beyond X58] - Page 38

post #371 of 1525
I am seeing E5-2650 as low as 39$ and e5-2660 FOR 45, e5-2670 for 50$.
That is a lot of CPU for a little bit of money.

The V2 series prices are slowly falling. Good things come to those who wait.

On another note. The prices of powerful GPUs are falling. GTX980Ti and Titan X for 400$
When the 10xx cards become more available the prices should drop farther as people upgrade and try to unload their cards.
post #372 of 1525
Quote:
Originally Posted by Insan1tyOne View Post

Haha "only" 14c / 28t with 35MB of L3 Cache you say? According to Intel's ARK this is quite a nice CPU, however, the speeds of it are just far too low for it to even be considered for gaming or anything like that. Although for pretty much any other application $235 for a CPU of that caliber is one of the best deals I have ever seen. Seriously, someone please go buy a bunch of these right now!

drool.gif
Now this is an interesting model indeed... This particular SKU is not even listed on Intel's ARK. That leads me to believe that it was a custom request by a company and was only produced for OEM purposes. What I find the most interesting is that its boost range is so large at ~1.5 Ghz. For 18c / 36t with 45mb of L3 Cache $399 is not a bad price at all. Although it would be terrible for gaming. Unless it could always run all cores at 3.5 Ghz, and even then, 3.5 Ghz is sadly still quite low for gaming purposes.
I have been throwing around an idea in my head when it comes to these V1 / V2 / V3 / V4 Xeons and "overclocking". I have no idea how / if it could even be done, but what if instead of finding a way to unlock the "hardware" locks on the multiplier, etc. Someone just found a way to unlock the "software" limitations on these Xeons? And by software limitations, I mean the Intel TurboBoost technology.

Each Xeon processor has a "Max Turbo Frequency" which is defined as "the maximum single core frequency at which the processor is capable of operating using Intel® Turbo Boost Technology." I also believe that there is a deeper feature of Intel TurboBoost which allows for all cores to simultaneously boost up to a certain (slightly lower than max) speed under the correct (very high system load) circumstances.

So now, what if someone were to create a program that just told Intel TurboBoost (because it is a piece of software that communicates / functions within the OS if I am not mistaken) to always run all processor cores at their maximum TurboBoost frequency regardless of system load?

In my opinion, the above solution seems like it would be several measures of magnitude easier to accomplish than trying to modify the pins / contacts of the CPU itself to fake less QPI connections or "disable" the CPUs overclocking security features. In my opinion, disabling pins will not result in any processor features being restored, as the only way to bring back these lost features would be to re-add the pins that Intel removed to block off these features in the first place. That is just the musings of someone who is neither an Hardware or Software Engineer though. 2cents.gif

- Insan1tyOne thumb.gif

Man i looked hard at these cpus. It appears it could be tricky though with Mobo support. I would love to have one of these to play with nevertheless
post #373 of 1525
Quote:
Originally Posted by dagget3450 View Post

Man i looked hard at these cpus. It appears it could be tricky though with Mobo support. I would love to have one of these to play with nevertheless

There isn't anything tricky about motherboard support with X99 Xeons. Especially with the list I posted a couple of pages back: (X79 is another story though...)

X99 ES CPU / Motherboard Compatibility List! (Click to show)

System Compatibility (Updated 6/11/2016):


The following is a list of products that we have tested to be compatible with ES CPUs:


Servers & Workstations:

  • Dell: PowerEdge R430/R530/T430 (BIOS 2.0.1), R630/R730/R730XD (BIOS 2.1.6), M630/FC630/M630 VRTX (BIOS 2.1.6), T630 (BIOS 2.1.5), C4130 (BIOS 2.1.5), C6320 (BIOS 2.1.5); Precision T5810 (BIOS A12), T7810 (BIOS A12), T7910 (BIOS A12), R7910 (BIOS 2.0.3)


Motherboards:

  • Supermicro: X10S series (all models with BIOS R2.0), X10D series (all models with BIOS R2.0), C7X99-OCE (BIOS R2.0)
  • Tyan: S562 series (BIOS V2.00), S707 series (BIOS V2.00), S708 series (BIOS V2.00)
  • Asus: Z10PA-D8 (BIOS 3107), Z10PE-D16 (BIOS 3104), Z10PR-D16 (BIOS 3104), Z10PE-D16 WS (BIOS 3204)
  • ASRock: EPC612 series (all models with BIOS 2.10), FH-C612NM (BIOS 1.10); X99 series (all models with BIOS 3.00 or above)
  • MSI: X99 Godlike Gaming Carbon (BIOS 2.3); X99A XPower Gaming Titanium; X99A Gaming Pro Carbon (BIOS 1.1); X99A Gaming 9 ACK (BIOS 3.4); X99S Gaming 9 AC (BIOS 1.B); X99A XPower AC (BIOS A.5); X99S XPower AC (BIOS 1.B); X99A/S Gaming 7 (BIOS H.E); X99A Raider (BIOS P.4)
  • EVGA: X99 Family (all models with BIOS 2.01 or above)


Note: A BIOS upgrade may be necessary for motherboards manufactured prior to the introduction of the Xeon E5-2600 v4 series.


The following is a list of products that we have tested to be incompatible with ES CPUs:


Servers & Workstations:

  • HP servers and workstations: support V4 processors with B0/M0/R0 stepping only


Motherboards:

  • Asus X99 series (all models): stuck at Q-Code 19 after reboot; supports V4 (pre-)QS or production processors only
  • Asus Z10PE-D8 WS (BIOS 3204): cannot power on when the 2nd CPU is installed; supports V4 (pre-)QS or production processors for dual-CPU configuration
  • Gigabyte X99 series (all models with BIOS F22): boot loop; support V4 processors with B0/M0/R0 stepping only
  • MSI X99 series (all models with BIOS released prior to 05/23/2016): boot loop; support V4 processors with B0/M0/R0 stepping only


Note: Please look for V4 QS (not ES2) processors that are compatible to these products instead. QS stands for "Qualification Sample." These CPUs are generally more widely supported than their earlier ES2 "Engineering Sample" versions.

Note 2: Production Intel processors have 5 letter S-Spec numbers starting from S. Engineering (ES) and Qualification Samples (QS) of Intel processors have 4-6 letter specification numbers starting from Q.

It is even easier if you have a production X99 CPU to push BIOS updates with if you have to buy a completely new board. But personally I would recommend going with either of these options:

  1. Intel Xeon E5-2683 v3 ($231)
  2. Intel Xeon E5-2686 v3 ($429)


I think this is the same seller I got my E5-2637 v3 ($280) from back when I bought it. They are great about telling you if your motherboard is compatible or recommending a good motherboard to buy.

DISCLAIMER: This is not advertising. I am just relaying a good experience I had in the past with fellow users.

- Insan1tyOne biggrin.gif
MiniNova
(16 items)
 
  
CPUMotherboardGraphicsRAM
Intel Xeon E5 2637 V3 Asrock X99E-ITX/ac Zotac GTX 1080 AMP! 16GB Mushkin Enhanced Blackline @ 2133mhz 
Hard DriveHard DriveCoolingOS
Samsung 850 Evo M.2 250GB WD Caviar Black 2TB Corsair H100i GTX Windows 10 Education Edition 
MonitorKeyboardPowerCase
LG 34UM95-P ErgoDox EZ EVGA G1 1000W Phanteks Enthoo Evolv ITX 
MouseMouse PadAudioAudio
Steelseries Sensei Steelseries 4HD Beyerdynamic T5p Headphones Schiit Mjolnir 2 Amp / Gungnir USB Gen. 2 DAC 
  hide details  
Reply
MiniNova
(16 items)
 
  
CPUMotherboardGraphicsRAM
Intel Xeon E5 2637 V3 Asrock X99E-ITX/ac Zotac GTX 1080 AMP! 16GB Mushkin Enhanced Blackline @ 2133mhz 
Hard DriveHard DriveCoolingOS
Samsung 850 Evo M.2 250GB WD Caviar Black 2TB Corsair H100i GTX Windows 10 Education Edition 
MonitorKeyboardPowerCase
LG 34UM95-P ErgoDox EZ EVGA G1 1000W Phanteks Enthoo Evolv ITX 
MouseMouse PadAudioAudio
Steelseries Sensei Steelseries 4HD Beyerdynamic T5p Headphones Schiit Mjolnir 2 Amp / Gungnir USB Gen. 2 DAC 
  hide details  
Reply
post #374 of 1525
Quote:
Originally Posted by Insan1tyOne View Post

There isn't anything tricky about motherboard support with X99 Xeons. Especially with the list I posted a couple of pages back: (X79 is another story though...)

X99 ES CPU / Motherboard Compatibility List! (Click to show)

System Compatibility (Updated 6/11/2016):


The following is a list of products that we have tested to be compatible with ES CPUs:


Servers & Workstations:

  • Dell: PowerEdge R430/R530/T430 (BIOS 2.0.1), R630/R730/R730XD (BIOS 2.1.6), M630/FC630/M630 VRTX (BIOS 2.1.6), T630 (BIOS 2.1.5), C4130 (BIOS 2.1.5), C6320 (BIOS 2.1.5); Precision T5810 (BIOS A12), T7810 (BIOS A12), T7910 (BIOS A12), R7910 (BIOS 2.0.3)


Motherboards:

  • Supermicro: X10S series (all models with BIOS R2.0), X10D series (all models with BIOS R2.0), C7X99-OCE (BIOS R2.0)
  • Tyan: S562 series (BIOS V2.00), S707 series (BIOS V2.00), S708 series (BIOS V2.00)
  • Asus: Z10PA-D8 (BIOS 3107), Z10PE-D16 (BIOS 3104), Z10PR-D16 (BIOS 3104), Z10PE-D16 WS (BIOS 3204)
  • ASRock: EPC612 series (all models with BIOS 2.10), FH-C612NM (BIOS 1.10); X99 series (all models with BIOS 3.00 or above)
  • MSI: X99 Godlike Gaming Carbon (BIOS 2.3); X99A XPower Gaming Titanium; X99A Gaming Pro Carbon (BIOS 1.1); X99A Gaming 9 ACK (BIOS 3.4); X99S Gaming 9 AC (BIOS 1.B); X99A XPower AC (BIOS A.5); X99S XPower AC (BIOS 1.B); X99A/S Gaming 7 (BIOS H.E); X99A Raider (BIOS P.4)
  • EVGA: X99 Family (all models with BIOS 2.01 or above)


Note: A BIOS upgrade may be necessary for motherboards manufactured prior to the introduction of the Xeon E5-2600 v4 series.


The following is a list of products that we have tested to be incompatible with ES CPUs:


Servers & Workstations:

  • HP servers and workstations: support V4 processors with B0/M0/R0 stepping only


Motherboards:

  • Asus X99 series (all models): stuck at Q-Code 19 after reboot; supports V4 (pre-)QS or production processors only
  • Asus Z10PE-D8 WS (BIOS 3204): cannot power on when the 2nd CPU is installed; supports V4 (pre-)QS or production processors for dual-CPU configuration
  • Gigabyte X99 series (all models with BIOS F22): boot loop; support V4 processors with B0/M0/R0 stepping only
  • MSI X99 series (all models with BIOS released prior to 05/23/2016): boot loop; support V4 processors with B0/M0/R0 stepping only


Note: Please look for V4 QS (not ES2) processors that are compatible to these products instead. QS stands for "Qualification Sample." These CPUs are generally more widely supported than their earlier ES2 "Engineering Sample" versions.

Note 2: Production Intel processors have 5 letter S-Spec numbers starting from S. Engineering (ES) and Qualification Samples (QS) of Intel processors have 4-6 letter specification numbers starting from Q.

It is even easier if you have a production X99 CPU to push BIOS updates with if you have to buy a completely new board. But personally I would recommend going with either of these options:

  1. Intel Xeon E5-2683 v3 ($231)
  2. Intel Xeon E5-2686 v3 ($429)


I think this is the same seller I got my E5-2637 v3 ($280) from back when I bought it. They are great about telling you if your motherboard is compatible or recommending a good motherboard to buy.

DISCLAIMER: This is not advertising. I am just relaying a good experience I had in the past with fellow users.

- Insan1tyOne biggrin.gif

Last time i bought an ES cpu was for my old X58 mobo. It had issues with turbo if i recall as in none. Do the x99 ES cpus have the same faults? I would really need turbo for when i did game.
post #375 of 1525
Quote:
Originally Posted by dagget3450 View Post

Last time i bought an ES cpu was for my old X58 mobo. It had issues with turbo if i recall as in none. Do the x99 ES cpus have the same faults? I would really need turbo for when i did game.

I have never experienced any problems with my Xeon E5-2637 V3 and Intel TurboBoost. I always keep my motherboard BIOS up-to-date and that seems to ward off a lot of the problems. Although personally I would not recommend either the Xeon E5-2683 or the E5-2686 if gaming performance is what you are after. I would look for a processor that has at least a base-frequency of 3.0 Ghz or above.

Regardless, here are the CPU-World specification sheets for both of the CPUs that you are interested in:

  1. Intel Xeon E5-2683 v3 ($231)
  2. Intel Xeon E5-2686 v3 ($429)

Enjoy!

- Insan1tyOne thumb.gif
MiniNova
(16 items)
 
  
CPUMotherboardGraphicsRAM
Intel Xeon E5 2637 V3 Asrock X99E-ITX/ac Zotac GTX 1080 AMP! 16GB Mushkin Enhanced Blackline @ 2133mhz 
Hard DriveHard DriveCoolingOS
Samsung 850 Evo M.2 250GB WD Caviar Black 2TB Corsair H100i GTX Windows 10 Education Edition 
MonitorKeyboardPowerCase
LG 34UM95-P ErgoDox EZ EVGA G1 1000W Phanteks Enthoo Evolv ITX 
MouseMouse PadAudioAudio
Steelseries Sensei Steelseries 4HD Beyerdynamic T5p Headphones Schiit Mjolnir 2 Amp / Gungnir USB Gen. 2 DAC 
  hide details  
Reply
MiniNova
(16 items)
 
  
CPUMotherboardGraphicsRAM
Intel Xeon E5 2637 V3 Asrock X99E-ITX/ac Zotac GTX 1080 AMP! 16GB Mushkin Enhanced Blackline @ 2133mhz 
Hard DriveHard DriveCoolingOS
Samsung 850 Evo M.2 250GB WD Caviar Black 2TB Corsair H100i GTX Windows 10 Education Edition 
MonitorKeyboardPowerCase
LG 34UM95-P ErgoDox EZ EVGA G1 1000W Phanteks Enthoo Evolv ITX 
MouseMouse PadAudioAudio
Steelseries Sensei Steelseries 4HD Beyerdynamic T5p Headphones Schiit Mjolnir 2 Amp / Gungnir USB Gen. 2 DAC 
  hide details  
Reply
post #376 of 1525
Quote:
Originally Posted by Insan1tyOne View Post

I have never experienced any problems with my Xeon E5-2637 V3 and Intel TurboBoost. I always keep my motherboard BIOS up-to-date and that seems to ward off a lot of the problems. Although personally I would not recommend either the Xeon E5-2683 or the E5-2686 if gaming performance is what you are after. I would look for a processor that has at least a base-frequency of 3.0 Ghz or above.

Regardless, here are the CPU-World specification sheets for both of the CPUs that you are interested in:

  1. Intel Xeon E5-2683 v3 ($231)
  2. Intel Xeon E5-2686 v3 ($429)

Enjoy!

- Insan1tyOne thumb.gif

Alright, one other thought. isn't bus clock able to give some small OC say 103-105mhz? combined with turbo should help some? there is multiple stages of Turbo boost as well? i.e. single core 3.5ghz, all cores 3.0ghz? If i got one it would be for toying around, gaming would also be part of that and probably 4k or so for reduction of cpu towards gpu.
post #377 of 1525
You can OC bus slightly even on some dual socket mobos, but the gain is very limited.

Looking at Intel's register documentation, there are at least 8 turbo multipliers controlling turbo with different number of (physical) cores enabled. So it's more like 3.5G 1C - 3.4G 2C - 3.3G 3C ... ... 2.8G 8C+. The clock will drop more if AVX is involved.

With enough cores loaded, TDP will get in the way.
Edited by MrKoala - 6/27/16 at 7:06pm
post #378 of 1525
+ rep guys thanks for the info. I will ponder it some more!
post #379 of 1525
Quote:
Originally Posted by Insan1tyOne View Post

I have never experienced any problems with my Xeon E5-2637 V3 and Intel TurboBoost. I always keep my motherboard BIOS up-to-date and that seems to ward off a lot of the problems. Although personally I would not recommend either the Xeon E5-2683 or the E5-2686 if gaming performance is what you are after. I would look for a processor that has at least a base-frequency of 3.0 Ghz or above.

Regardless, here are the CPU-World specification sheets for both of the CPUs that you are interested in:

  1. Intel Xeon E5-2683 v3 ($231)
  2. Intel Xeon E5-2686 v3 ($429)

Enjoy!

- Insan1tyOne thumb.gif
I have a 2670 with 106.5 fab which give me around 2.78ghz and a turbo on all core at 3.2.. It's enough in my opinion. Maybe it will be interesting to have a comparison between different clock speed in game.
The 2667v2 or 2687w v1 seems to be really good. The 2667 have a turbo at 4ghz. But prices are not really good for the moment...
post #380 of 1525
Quote:
Originally Posted by Beufesamiteur View Post

I have a 2670 with 106.5 fab which give me around 2.78ghz and a turbo on all core at 3.2.. It's enough in my opinion. Maybe it will be interesting to have a comparison between different clock speed in game.
The 2667v2 or 2687w v1 seems to be really good. The 2667 have a turbo at 4ghz. But prices are not really good for the moment...
what is it? 106.5 fab?
Edit: got it. FSB
Edited by mohiuddin - 6/28/16 at 9:08am
New Posts  All Forums:Forum Nav:
  Return Home
  Back to Forum: Intel - General
Overclock.net › Forums › Intel › Intel - General › Xeon Hacking and Overclocking X79/X99 [Beyond X58]