Overclock.net › Forums › Industry News › Software News › [The Hacker news] Windows 10 Sends Your Data 5500 Times Every Day Even After Tweaking Privacy Settings
New Posts  All Forums:Forum Nav:

[The Hacker news] Windows 10 Sends Your Data 5500 Times Every Day Even After Tweaking Privacy Settings - Page 3

post #21 of 36
This 'article' was an issue like 3 or 4 weeks ago, and it's coming up again??
Lean & Mean
(22 items)
 
 
CPUGraphicsRAMHard Drive
Core i7 3740QM nVidia 650m GT 2GB G.Skill 16GB DDR3-1600  Samsung 850 Pro 
Optical DriveCoolingOSMouse
Blu-Ray Coolermaster Note Windows 10 Razer Mamba 
  hide details  
Reply
Lean & Mean
(22 items)
 
 
CPUGraphicsRAMHard Drive
Core i7 3740QM nVidia 650m GT 2GB G.Skill 16GB DDR3-1600  Samsung 850 Pro 
Optical DriveCoolingOSMouse
Blu-Ray Coolermaster Note Windows 10 Razer Mamba 
  hide details  
Reply
post #22 of 36
Quote:
Originally Posted by serothis View Post

Saying that "because phones already do it, you shouldn't expect better of your desktop/laptop" is a cop out...

For example. If a girl posts a picture of herself in a bikini at a beach on FB, is it ok for me to stand outside her window with telephoto lens taking pictures of her as she changes cloths? The obvious answer is NO!

It doesn't matter if you could figure out that information another way or if that information is already out there. I expect different levels of privacy in different situations. I expect a hell of a lot more privacy on my desktop then I do on my phone.

RE: your edit. EULAs are not always legally binding. https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/End-user_license_agreement#Enforceability_of_EULAs_in_the_United_States

I'm just saying, it's been happening, so what's the surprise that Microsoft wants to do it? Second, it's not a cop out, it's the truth, have you heard anyone say "I'm not using iPhone because they track me? " or same for Android? And why do you expect more privacy on your desktop than your phone? Your phone is a mini computer....you can buy stuff on it with easily accessible credit card info (just like pc), cell phones are becoming known for "gaming consoles" for some apparent reason (again I don't always agree), and has personal information on it. What's the difference? Also, when she posts on FB...it's FB's property at that point...not her's...just wanting to throw that out there as well. Does this mean people are going to stop using Facebook?
post #23 of 36
Quote:
Originally Posted by Punisher64 View Post

I'm just saying, it's been happening, so what's the surprise that Microsoft wants to do it?

Again, different levels of expected privacy. I expect more privacy on my desktop than on my phone. That is why it's more rage inducing when microsoft does it. Their software is in contact with a deeper level of expected privacy.
Quote:
Second, it's not a cop out, it's the truth, have you heard anyone say "I'm not using iPhone because they track me? " or same for Android? And why do you expect more privacy on your desktop than your phone? Your phone is a mini computer....you can buy stuff on it with easily accessible credit card info (just like pc), cell phones are becoming known for "gaming consoles" for some apparent reason (again I don't always agree), and has personal information on it. What's the difference?

Do you have your whole repository of pictures/movies on your phone? do you have your tax information on your phone? Do you have copies of legal documents (insurance policies, deeds, living wills, employment information, etc) on our phone?

I have all these things on my desktop but not my phone. I would say that's a pretty huge difference.
Quote:
Also, when she posts on FB...it's FB's property at that point...not her's...just wanting to throw that out there as well. Does this mean people are going to stop using Facebook?

FB was just an example. Let's say she keeps it on her phone but shows it to friends and coworkers. Let's say I'm one of those people she shows it to. Do I now have the right to stand outsid her bedroom window with a telephoto lens and take pictures of her every morning while she changes cloths? The answer is still no.

A phone is still more likely to bee seen by other people. I might explicitly show people photos or I might pass my phone to someone and they might use it for something, giving them temporary access to photos. But either way, it's still more public than my desktop. It's like the difference between the kitchen and your bedroom. One is more private than the other.
Edited by serothis - 2/23/16 at 9:57am
Langour
(13 items)
 
  
CPUMotherboardGraphicsRAM
i5 2500k @ 4.7ghz MSI p67a-gd80 MSI N580GTX Lightning @ 960mhz Mushkin Ridgeback 8gb (2 x 4gb) 
Hard DrivePowerCase
WD blue caviar 1T; Mushkin Castillo SSD 60gb Corsair 850HX Corsair 600T Special Edition 
  hide details  
Reply
Langour
(13 items)
 
  
CPUMotherboardGraphicsRAM
i5 2500k @ 4.7ghz MSI p67a-gd80 MSI N580GTX Lightning @ 960mhz Mushkin Ridgeback 8gb (2 x 4gb) 
Hard DrivePowerCase
WD blue caviar 1T; Mushkin Castillo SSD 60gb Corsair 850HX Corsair 600T Special Edition 
  hide details  
Reply
post #24 of 36
Quote:
Originally Posted by Dienz View Post

This 'article' was an issue like 3 or 4 weeks ago, and it's coming up again??
Quote:
Originally Posted by serothis View Post


Again, different levels of expected privacy. I expect more privacy on my desktop than on my phone. That is why it's more rage inducing when microsoft does it. Their software is in contact with a deeper level of expected privacy.
Do you have your whole repository of pictures/movies on your phone? do you have your tax information on your phone? Do you have copies of legal documents (insurance policies, deeds, living wills, employment information, etc) on our phone?

You have to think about what you mean on your phone. Do you use Google Chrome or Firefox? That sync passwords and favorites? Most tax information/legal documents/insurance (I know for a fact, BCBS emails me and I log in through a web browser to view claims) is easily available on the internet, and if you sync passwords/history/etc....it's just as available on your phone as your PC. Also as for the pictures and videos, personally I do not...technically again. Do you use Google Photos to autobackup your pictures to the cloud? Or Dropbox? Are you logged in on your phone? Again...very easily accessible from your phone. Am I wrong on this? If you backup your tax documents as well to the cloud...again...most have clients on their phone that they can access all this...and if you store it on Google's Cloud, I'm sure Google has seen what's on there...and is phoning home if something illegal (torrents) go up. Just like Dropbox...
post #25 of 36
Quote:
Originally Posted by Punisher64 View Post


You have to think about what you mean on your phone. Do you use Google Chrome or Firefox? That sync passwords and favorites? Most tax information/legal documents/insurance (I know for a fact, BCBS emails me and I log in through a web browser to view claims) is easily available on the internet, and if you sync passwords/history/etc....it's just as available on your phone as your PC. Also as for the pictures and videos, personally I do not...technically again. Do you use Google Photos to autobackup your pictures to the cloud? Or Dropbox? Are you logged in on your phone? Again...very easily accessible from your phone. Am I wrong on this? If you backup your tax documents as well to the cloud...again...most have clients on their phone that they can access all this...and if you store it on Google's Cloud, I'm sure Google has seen what's on there...and is phoning home if something illegal (torrents) go up. Just like Dropbox...

The flaw of this is argument is that all of this requires the user to set up access with other companies. All of this requires the user to willingly put that information out there (outside the user's personal desktops environment). At that point the information is in environments with different levels of expected privacy. If that information then becomes public, It again does not forfeit your expected levels of privacy for your desktop.

Again, it doesn't matter if that information is out there or could be attained another way. it doesn't matter if some one steals my tax records from some other server, I still expect my desktop to remain private. That's the issue at hand here. That's why microsoft get's grief while other companies do not (or not as much).

EDIT: I would even go as far as to say it doesn't matter how relaxed my security procedures are, different environments have different expected levels of privacy. If I leave the front door to my home unlocked, that doesn't give strangers the right to walk in and poke around.

For the record: I do not sync/save passwords or use a universal key. I memorize all of mine. I do not use drop box. I use photobucket and imgur but only for a means to post those pictures on the internet. They do not act as a complete repository. No I don't auto upload. I do not use google docs for legally sensitive information. That stuff is backed up and encrypted. My "cloud" is my own private server, not a public one.
Edited by serothis - 2/23/16 at 10:35am
Langour
(13 items)
 
  
CPUMotherboardGraphicsRAM
i5 2500k @ 4.7ghz MSI p67a-gd80 MSI N580GTX Lightning @ 960mhz Mushkin Ridgeback 8gb (2 x 4gb) 
Hard DrivePowerCase
WD blue caviar 1T; Mushkin Castillo SSD 60gb Corsair 850HX Corsair 600T Special Edition 
  hide details  
Reply
Langour
(13 items)
 
  
CPUMotherboardGraphicsRAM
i5 2500k @ 4.7ghz MSI p67a-gd80 MSI N580GTX Lightning @ 960mhz Mushkin Ridgeback 8gb (2 x 4gb) 
Hard DrivePowerCase
WD blue caviar 1T; Mushkin Castillo SSD 60gb Corsair 850HX Corsair 600T Special Edition 
  hide details  
Reply
post #26 of 36
Why is this thread still here? It should be locked. This was already debunked before the start date of this thread.

Methodology was practically non-existent. Read debunked article... the premise for the entire article was flawed from the beginning,
The Big Ugly 2.5
(13 items)
 
Spectre x360
(7 items)
 
 
CPUMotherboardGraphicsRAM
Intel i7 2600k Asus P8P67 B3 MSI GTX 1080 Ti 16GB Corsair XMS3 1600 
Hard DriveHard DriveHard DriveOptical Drive
Samsung 850 Pro 512GB Barracuda 7200.12 1TB Hitachi 7K3000 2TB Pioneer BDR-206D 
OSMonitorPowerCase
W7 Pro x64 Dell U3415W Corsair AX850 Corsair 600T 
Mouse
Logitech G500 
CPURAMHard DriveOS
i7 6500U 8GB DDL3L 256GB M.2  Windows 10 
MonitorKeyboardCase
2560 x 1440 Touchscreen Awesome! Aluminum Billet 
  hide details  
Reply
The Big Ugly 2.5
(13 items)
 
Spectre x360
(7 items)
 
 
CPUMotherboardGraphicsRAM
Intel i7 2600k Asus P8P67 B3 MSI GTX 1080 Ti 16GB Corsair XMS3 1600 
Hard DriveHard DriveHard DriveOptical Drive
Samsung 850 Pro 512GB Barracuda 7200.12 1TB Hitachi 7K3000 2TB Pioneer BDR-206D 
OSMonitorPowerCase
W7 Pro x64 Dell U3415W Corsair AX850 Corsair 600T 
Mouse
Logitech G500 
CPURAMHard DriveOS
i7 6500U 8GB DDL3L 256GB M.2  Windows 10 
MonitorKeyboardCase
2560 x 1440 Touchscreen Awesome! Aluminum Billet 
  hide details  
Reply
post #27 of 36
Quote:
Originally Posted by Punisher64 View Post

This stuff has to stop.

WARNING: RANT INCOMING

If you think that Windows 10 was the first to 'phone home' and to collect data, you must be living under a rock. Apple and Google track exactly where you take pictures as well as can tell you where you've been (all that data is logged, especially the no-no trips you don't want your gf/wife to find out about). My phone, without me telling it a single thing mind you, can tell me where I work, where my house is, and normally what days I do what. Here comes the second part of the rant....with all the cyber hacking going on, Microsoft is in a way (NOTE: I do not agree totally with the phone home system) protecting us from security flaws. Also, here's the biggest part: don't do anything bad...and well....nothing to worry about! Good grief people, quit complaining about the stupid stuff that's meant to help us just because you're scared big brother is going to find that secret folder of pr0n that you've been hiding.
First off, I never said Microsoft was the sole problem, nor did I forget to go out of my way to point out that the entire market is being pushed in the direction of data collection. I went on to highlight the fact that the alarmist attitude we're seeing from journalists is provoked by how the government is dealing with this exploitatively instead of protectively. That's why journalists are searching for an example of corporations lying about data collection -- because the government has granted corporations legal immunity to lie, through CISA. CISA impacts the free market viability of honest privacy policy, so journalists are doing their job and trying to find dishonest privacy policy. Unfortunately, mainstream media is fundamentally broken and smaller journalists can't hire a software engineer to validate their sources. That does not mean they should stop trying to break this story. Warning: Spoiler! (Click to show)
The conversation isn't even about Windows 10; people are just focusing on Windows 10 because it's the most likely product to trailblaze transgressions of our government. The real intention of all these reports is to expose the intentions of the government, not Microsoft.

Secondly, it's difficult for Microsoft or any other corporation to protect you from security flaws when the government is pressuring them to create security flaws. Encryption, also, is under fire from the government and will likely be illegal within a decade or so. They move slowly, and if you were alive around the time that they were warming us up to law involving copyright, speech, privacy, and software licenses.. you'd understand how this works.

Thirdly and lastly, the concern about breach of privacy doesn't come from people who are afraid of being caught doing something wrong. Privacy law is not to protect criminals. It's to protect innocent people from criminal governments. We understood that all-access government was dangerous during the formation of the country before the information age; I find it baffling to see people so confused about this concept all of a sudden.

You said it yourself. GPS alone makes it easy to find out where you work, who you're spending time with, what church you go to, what protests you attend. Very accurate algorithms already exist to scavenge web history for targeted advertising to define your next purchase. How hard is it to use that to find potential political adversaries or proliferators of unfavorable speech? No one is saying they're scared of privacy infringement because they're doing something wrong. Privacy infringement, especially on this technological scale, is scary all on it's own. You don't need to be a conspiracy theorist to see that; it was once understood as a fundamental individual right necessary to maintain a free society and that's why it was a cornerstone of our society.
Quote:
Originally Posted by Punisher64 
You did give consent, when you accepted the EULA. Check.Mate.
You did not need to have knowledge, let alone give consent, when CISA S. 2588 was passed for you, your children, and your children's children. And again, this is a failed argument. A EULA is contract law and can not void your inalienable human right to privacy from the government. You offer that a person retains the right to exclude themselves from modern day life as a way to escape government surveillance; it's hard for me to address all the things that are wrong with that suggestion, but I think even the most steadfast toady needs not have it explained to them. If you're not interested enough to think out your opinion, you shouldn't give one.

And I'll add: when the majority of the population is too ignorant to see the problem with the destruction of privacy from government, the individual who works hard to retain his right to privacy will still suffer the damage. Want for privacy is quickly becoming perceived as backward, suspicious, isolationism. The inalienable right for privacy outlined in our constitution is losing it's value without official denouncement. Suggesting that a person should not participate in modern life to solve their thirst for a right to privacy is just.. insane.
Edited by Mookster - 2/23/16 at 7:42pm
Trash Box
(15 items)
 
 
G73JH-A1
(13 items)
 
CPUMotherboardGraphicsRAM
i7 980x @ 4.4GHz Asus P6X58D-E Gigabyte 8GB GTX 1070 G1 Gaming 24GB Corsair Dominators 1600MHz 
Hard DriveHard DriveMonitorKeyboard
2x256GB C300's R0 1TB Samsung 850 Pro ASUS MG279Q, Catleap Q270 G19 
PowerCaseMouse
Corsair AX1200 Silverstone RV-02 G9x 
CPUMotherboardGraphicsRAM
AMD 965BE 125W Asus M4A77D Asus 5770 Cucore 4GB Kingston 800MHz 
Hard DriveOptical DriveOSKeyboard
2x750GB Seagates 22x LG DVD-RW w7 Ultimate 64-bit  G15 
PowerCase
Antec Earthwatts 430W 80+ Antec New Solution NSK6580B 
CPUMotherboardGraphicsRAM
720QM AsusTek Mobility HD5870 8GB Kingston 1600MHz 
Hard DriveOptical DriveOSMonitor
256GB C300/500GB Seagate Bluray Combo w7 Ultimate 64-bit 17'' 1080P 
Case
G73JH-A1 
  hide details  
Reply
Trash Box
(15 items)
 
 
G73JH-A1
(13 items)
 
CPUMotherboardGraphicsRAM
i7 980x @ 4.4GHz Asus P6X58D-E Gigabyte 8GB GTX 1070 G1 Gaming 24GB Corsair Dominators 1600MHz 
Hard DriveHard DriveMonitorKeyboard
2x256GB C300's R0 1TB Samsung 850 Pro ASUS MG279Q, Catleap Q270 G19 
PowerCaseMouse
Corsair AX1200 Silverstone RV-02 G9x 
CPUMotherboardGraphicsRAM
AMD 965BE 125W Asus M4A77D Asus 5770 Cucore 4GB Kingston 800MHz 
Hard DriveOptical DriveOSKeyboard
2x750GB Seagates 22x LG DVD-RW w7 Ultimate 64-bit  G15 
PowerCase
Antec Earthwatts 430W 80+ Antec New Solution NSK6580B 
CPUMotherboardGraphicsRAM
720QM AsusTek Mobility HD5870 8GB Kingston 1600MHz 
Hard DriveOptical DriveOSMonitor
256GB C300/500GB Seagate Bluray Combo w7 Ultimate 64-bit 17'' 1080P 
Case
G73JH-A1 
  hide details  
Reply
post #28 of 36
Quote:
Originally Posted by serothis View Post

For example. If a girl posts a picture of herself in a bikini at a beach on FB, is it ok for me to stand outside her window with telephoto lens taking pictures of her as she changes cloths? The obvious answer is NO!

Actually, if she is in plain view from a public area, the answer is, creepily, yes.
The Big Ugly 2.5
(13 items)
 
Spectre x360
(7 items)
 
 
CPUMotherboardGraphicsRAM
Intel i7 2600k Asus P8P67 B3 MSI GTX 1080 Ti 16GB Corsair XMS3 1600 
Hard DriveHard DriveHard DriveOptical Drive
Samsung 850 Pro 512GB Barracuda 7200.12 1TB Hitachi 7K3000 2TB Pioneer BDR-206D 
OSMonitorPowerCase
W7 Pro x64 Dell U3415W Corsair AX850 Corsair 600T 
Mouse
Logitech G500 
CPURAMHard DriveOS
i7 6500U 8GB DDL3L 256GB M.2  Windows 10 
MonitorKeyboardCase
2560 x 1440 Touchscreen Awesome! Aluminum Billet 
  hide details  
Reply
The Big Ugly 2.5
(13 items)
 
Spectre x360
(7 items)
 
 
CPUMotherboardGraphicsRAM
Intel i7 2600k Asus P8P67 B3 MSI GTX 1080 Ti 16GB Corsair XMS3 1600 
Hard DriveHard DriveHard DriveOptical Drive
Samsung 850 Pro 512GB Barracuda 7200.12 1TB Hitachi 7K3000 2TB Pioneer BDR-206D 
OSMonitorPowerCase
W7 Pro x64 Dell U3415W Corsair AX850 Corsair 600T 
Mouse
Logitech G500 
CPURAMHard DriveOS
i7 6500U 8GB DDL3L 256GB M.2  Windows 10 
MonitorKeyboardCase
2560 x 1440 Touchscreen Awesome! Aluminum Billet 
  hide details  
Reply
post #29 of 36
Quote:
Originally Posted by coachmark2 View Post

This is Forbes sensationalism at its worst

Here is a well-written rebuttal of the data and Forbes article:

http://www.zdnet.com/article/when-it-comes-to-windows-10-privacy-dont-trust-amateur-analysts/

That was actually a good read, thanks for the link. thumb.gif
post #30 of 36
Quote:
Originally Posted by XAslanX View Post

This isn't a Forbes article, it was written by a Cyber Security Expert. Her credentials check out https://in.linkedin.com/in/swati-khandelwal-4566b78a

With her only jobs being writing about tech stuff.
    
CPUMotherboardGraphicsRAM
i5 3570k 4.8 Ghz ASUS SABERTOOTH Z77 atx MSI 660ti SLI Corsair Vengeance 1866mHz 16Gb 
Hard DriveCoolingOSPower
Mx200 250 GB, 1TB WD Black Corsair H80  Win7 Home Premium Corsair 850HX 
Case
Carbide 400R 
  hide details  
Reply
    
CPUMotherboardGraphicsRAM
i5 3570k 4.8 Ghz ASUS SABERTOOTH Z77 atx MSI 660ti SLI Corsair Vengeance 1866mHz 16Gb 
Hard DriveCoolingOSPower
Mx200 250 GB, 1TB WD Black Corsair H80  Win7 Home Premium Corsair 850HX 
Case
Carbide 400R 
  hide details  
Reply
New Posts  All Forums:Forum Nav:
  Return Home
  Back to Forum: Software News
Overclock.net › Forums › Industry News › Software News › [The Hacker news] Windows 10 Sends Your Data 5500 Times Every Day Even After Tweaking Privacy Settings