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[IGN]NASA Knows how to Land People on Mars inside a Month - Page 3

post #21 of 39
Quote:
Originally Posted by hhuey5 View Post

it reminds me of Star Trek Deep Space Nine Episode
...
the only difference is bring your own lasers to sail

I'm really surprise that it has take such a long time to realize this new engine
Its apparent when NASA put up the umbrella on skylab that solar wind had an effect

it doesn't take much physics to come up with the principle of the solar sail
I know there is at least one syfy author who use the solar sail in his book
I wonder if it was Nivens or someone else

Yeah, Nivens has always been above the curve out by himself.
post #22 of 39

Us ocners are all astrophysicists at heart

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post #23 of 39
Seems legit.
Quote:
Originally Posted by Calibos View Post

Thats about as useful as me 'knowing' how to travel to Alpha Centuri in a few hours. I 'just' need an Alcubierre Warp Drive.

Yep.
post #24 of 39
Quote:
Lubin explains that the proposed system would require about the same amount of energy as the upcoming Space Launch System to get to "relativistic speeds." Which is to say speeds matching a significant percentage of the speed of light. In this case, 30 percent in about 10 minutes.

Someone misunderstood something.

To start with - the same energy as the SLS? Is that once it is in orbit, or is that from the ground? Because I would like to see the laser that can get something into orbit.

On seconds thoughts, I really wouldn't like to see it.

Additionally, 0.3c in ten minutes involves quite a lot of acceleration:
Warning: Spoiler! (Click to show)
c = 299,792,458 m/s
0.3c = 89,937,737 m/s

10 minutes = 600 seconds

a = dV/t

a = 89,937,737/600 = 149,896 m/s²

OK, this is ignoring relativity because I can't remember the equations off the top of my head, and I can't be bothered to look them up.

15,279G

I don't know that we have anything that could survive fifteen thousand G's.

Edit: I was wrong, it turns out that 15,000G is the rating of electronics in artillery shells. So we could probably build something useful that could survive that acceleration. /Edit




Quote:
Originally Posted by KonaJoe View Post

The acceleration/deceleration forces to reach mars within 1 month would mean roughly constant +5g forces the whole way.

I can see what you are saying, but it's actually not that bad - you'd be seeing accelerations of somewhere around 0.0137G.

The fastest way to get a ship between two planets is to accelerate halfway there, and then decelerate for the other half. You could make use of aerobraking in Mars' atmosphere, meaning you could accelerate for a little over half way there and ditch the remaining speed when you get there, but that then means that you have to add in extra heat shielding and design your orbital vessel for wind resistance.

If we ignore aerobraking (and the relative motion of the planets, and orbital velocity, and a whole bunch of other things), we can quite easily work out the required accelerations.

Earth - Mars distance is between 54.6 and 401 million kilometers depending on their relative positions in orbit. We probably won't be travelling to Mars when it is 401m km away, partly because it would take longer and partly because the sun would be in the way.

So let's assume an average - 225m km.
Warning: Spoiler! (Click to show)
1 month is 2,592,000 seconds.

We need to get half way in half the time, so 112,500,000,000m in 1,296,000s

Equations of motion give us s=ut+1/2at²

Since we are starting out from "rest", u=0
So s = 1/2at²
Rearranging gives a = 2s/t²

a = (2 * 112,500,000,000)/1,296,000²
a = 0.134m/s

a=0.0137G


We can easily survive that, after all we survive 73 times that every day, although it might just be enough to make some tasks annoying.

Incidentally, on the way you would also pass about 170km/s, becoming the fastest man made object by far (currently held by the Helios 2 probe, at 70km/s, despite what Fox news says)
Edited by GingerJohn - 2/23/16 at 5:26am
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post #25 of 39
Quote:
Originally Posted by KonaJoe View Post

The acceleration/deceleration forces to reach mars within 1 month would mean roughly constant +5g forces the whole way.

A single g of constant acceleration would get you to Mars in about two days.

We aren't anywhere near able to keep up that sort of acceleration for any significant period of time, however. If we were, it would completely revolutionize space travel. We could explore the entire solar system in a matter of months, reach nearby stars in under a decade, and maintain Earth-like artificial gravity the entire time.
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post #26 of 39
This article is really useless. The technology has been under research for a while now but they still have yet to actually APPLY the technology and are along way from doing so. Theory is nothing without practical application.
post #27 of 39
Quote:
Originally Posted by Blameless View Post

A single g of constant acceleration would get you to Mars in about two days.

We aren't anywhere near able to keep up that sort of acceleration for any significant period of time, however. If we were, it would completely revolutionize space travel. We could explore the entire solar system in a matter of months, reach nearby stars in under a decade, and maintain Earth-like artificial gravity the entire time.

you seen Salvage One Translinear Vector Principle
Quote:
Back in 1979 there was a shortlived (1 1/2 season) TV show called "Salvage 1." The plot was that a curmudgeonly rocket scientist (Andy Griffith) built a home-made rocket in his junk yard, with the intent of going to the moon and salvaging discarded Apollo hardware.

The flight plan was based on an idea called the "Trans-Linear Vector Principle." Under this principle, the rocket lifted off for the moon under slow but constant acceleration. Although the initial velocity seemed much too slow to ever reach the moon, the steady acceleration soon brought the Vulture to great speeds once in space. Acceleration continued until they reached the halfway point between the Earth and Moon, at which time the ship began to decelerate ending in a smooth touchdown on the lunar surface. Total time to reach the moon was a mere 24 hours compared to three days for the Apollo missions. The trip back home followed the same procedure. The advantages of the Trans-Linear Vector Principle were many:
Two days round trip to the moon and back.
A single stage rocket was all that was needed for the flight, reducing complexity.
No mid-flight orbiting of either the Earth or the moon. It was a direct ascent and descent flight.
No re-entry heating since the trip through the atmosphere was a slow, gentle descent.
No weightlessness since the ship was always in a state of acceleration or deceleration.
segment end at 18:14

its suppose to save on fuel


scientist need a platform in space or the moon to test out their theories
an environment that self-sustaining; needing very little from earth

as long as they remain on earth smothered with politics n budgeting
all these great ideas just get written as thesis n stored on the shelf
until another scientist has some budget to test the next study goes along until the money runs out
results get written up n put back on the book shelf
Edited by hhuey5 - 2/24/16 at 3:53pm
post #28 of 39
It really irritates me that Obama axed Bush's manned-moon-mission-by-2020 initiative in favor of going after some asteroid to land on. The moon is a serious resource that is reasonably close by and the US should absolutely start prioritizing getting humans back up there as soon as possible. Other countries like China are aggressively targeting manned-moon missions in the near-term yet the only country to ever accomplish this feat (nearly 50 years ago at that) is sitting on its hands and allowing its own space program to languish. A Mars mission is absolutely feasible and important as well but what better way to prepare for such an ambitious program than to hone the skills and resources necessary with manned moon missions that are so much closer to home?
post #29 of 39
Quote:
Originally Posted by Majin SSJ Eric View Post

A one month journey to Mars rather than eight would make the trip far more feasible and cost-effective. NASA has got to start using SOMETHING that is not still based on a chemical rocket relic from WWII. Its nearly 2020 for God's sakes!
We already have the technology to go to Mars in a week or less, and we've had it since before we had the huge chemical rockets that took us to the Moon.

What we haven't had is the political will to build the thing.
     
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post #30 of 39
no thank you I have a fear of heights so going to mars or the moon doesn't appeal to me lol.
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