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Adaptive Voltage Giving Higher VCore than Manual

post #1 of 8
Thread Starter 
I have been able to get my system to a stable 4.7 GHz # 1.37 Vcore in the UEFI. I've run 5 passes of ROG and CineBench without any issues. I've also passed 4 hours of ROG stress test and an overnight loop of x264. My temps have not exceeded 70C throughout all this (I have HT turned off as I don't need it). Anyway, my Vcore always shows as 1.360 in the OS and the UEFI even though it's set to 1.37 (manual mode). However, when I set it to adaptive mode and use the same 1.370, my Vcore actually goes all the way up to 1.41 but never goes as low as 1.360. The offset is set to 0.001 as I can't make it Auto again.

I thought adaptive voltage was better because it can determine when to use less voltage if the CPU isn't in use. And to add on to that, the CPU frequency is always at 4.7 GHz even at idle, but I'm not sure how to change this to make it under-clock when idle and overclock when necessary.
Edited by Timid - 2/22/16 at 6:14pm
post #2 of 8
I have the 6700k and the Asus Z170-AR

I managed to find a stable 4.5Ghz OC with 1.320 vcore on manual voltage.

I also managed to find an equivalent adaptive voltage by setting the additional turbo voltage to Auto, and setting the offset to +0.080 or +0.090 depending on stability (haven't had a chance to fully test yet) but with these settings I managed to find the equivalent vcore under load.

I would recommend that you keep your additional turbo voltage to Auto and increase your offset only, obviously that would differ from one system to another but its worth a shot.

please keep inmind that the settings I posted above were related to my personal PC and might differ in your case. I hope this helps, GL. thumb.gif
post #3 of 8
If you are using adaptive voltage, you can usually tweak your voltage offset (not sure what its called on asus) to get closer to what you found you needed manually.

As for the clocking down at low use, make sure your c-states and EIST are enabled in your bios, then you have to go into your windows power option and change your minimum processor state to 5%.
post #4 of 8
Quote:
Originally Posted by kl6mk6 View Post

If you are using adaptive voltage, you can usually tweak your voltage offset (not sure what its called on asus) to get closer to what you found you needed manually.

As for the clocking down at low use, make sure your c-states and EIST are enabled in your bios, then you have to go into your windows power option and change your minimum processor state to 5%.

on point, +rep good sir.
post #5 of 8
Thread Starter 
Quote:
Originally Posted by kl6mk6 View Post

If you are using adaptive voltage, you can usually tweak your voltage offset (not sure what its called on asus) to get closer to what you found you needed manually.

As for the clocking down at low use, make sure your c-states and EIST are enabled in your bios, then you have to go into your windows power option and change your minimum processor state to 5%.

I've read the adaptive voltage should be set to whatever your stable manual voltage is when you're overclocking, so in my case I set it to 1.37. Note that when I set 1.37v in manual mode, HWMonitor and the UEFI sees 1.36v being provided, which I tested and found to be stable.

I adjusted the offset previously and can no longer make it auto meaning the lowest I can set it to is 0.001v. Even when I set it to that and use an adaptive voltage of 1.37, my new Vcore now hovers between 1.379 and 1.41 and never goes lower than the 1.379. This doesn't make sense considering the manual Vcore of 1.37 never goes above 1.36v in the OS.

As for the 2nd part, I was able to change that and now my CPU speeds go as low as 1.8 GHz, but my Vcore remains the same.

EDIT: I was under the impression that the way adaptive voltage worked meant if I set it to 1.37v, my voltage will never go above that, however it can go below that depending on my processor frequency. Since I had my minimum state set to 100% in Windows, it makes sense why it never dropped below, but what I don't understand is why it rises as high as 1.41v even with an offset of 0.001v which would total to 1.371v.
Edited by Timid - 2/22/16 at 8:28pm
post #6 of 8
Hello, try increasing offset value and decreasing the vcore accordingly. Eg, http://www.overclock.net/t/1570313/skylake-overclocking-guide-with-statistics/5670#post_24891730
post #7 of 8
Quote:
Originally Posted by Timid View Post

I've read the adaptive voltage should be set to whatever your stable manual voltage is when you're overclocking, so in my case I set it to 1.37. Note that when I set 1.37v in manual mode, HWMonitor and the UEFI sees 1.36v being provided, which I tested and found to be stable.

I adjusted the offset previously and can no longer make it auto meaning the lowest I can set it to is 0.001v. Even when I set it to that and use an adaptive voltage of 1.37, my new Vcore now hovers between 1.379 and 1.41 and never goes lower than the 1.379. This doesn't make sense considering the manual Vcore of 1.37 never goes above 1.36v in the OS.

As for the 2nd part, I was able to change that and now my CPU speeds go as low as 1.8 GHz, but my Vcore remains the same.

EDIT: I was under the impression that the way adaptive voltage worked meant if I set it to 1.37v, my voltage will never go above that, however it can go below that depending on my processor frequency. Since I had my minimum state set to 100% in Windows, it makes sense why it never dropped below, but what I don't understand is why it rises as high as 1.41v even with an offset of 0.001v which would total to 1.371v.

Hmmm, some mfgs will have the ability to do a negative offset. Try manually typing it in with a (-) before your offset?
post #8 of 8
Quote:
Originally Posted by Timid View Post

I've read the adaptive voltage should be set to whatever your stable manual voltage is when you're overclocking, so in my case I set it to 1.37. Note that when I set 1.37v in manual mode, HWMonitor and the UEFI sees 1.36v being provided, which I tested and found to be stable.

I adjusted the offset previously and can no longer make it auto meaning the lowest I can set it to is 0.001v. Even when I set it to that and use an adaptive voltage of 1.37, my new Vcore now hovers between 1.379 and 1.41 and never goes lower than the 1.379. This doesn't make sense considering the manual Vcore of 1.37 never goes above 1.36v in the OS.

As for the 2nd part, I was able to change that and now my CPU speeds go as low as 1.8 GHz, but my Vcore remains the same.

EDIT: I was under the impression that the way adaptive voltage worked meant if I set it to 1.37v, my voltage will never go above that, however it can go below that depending on my processor frequency. Since I had my minimum state set to 100% in Windows, it makes sense why it never dropped below, but what I don't understand is why it rises as high as 1.41v even with an offset of 0.001v which would total to 1.371v.

Any update to this? I'm also experiencing this. If I use adaptive, the vcore boosts to 1.28v even if I set a maximum of 1.25v. All along I thought that under 100% load, adaptive would use 1.25v and when idle, it would use a lower voltage.
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