Overclock.net › Forums › Intel › Intel CPUs › How can I get a more precise Vcore (Adaptive mode)
New Posts  All Forums:Forum Nav:

How can I get a more precise Vcore (Adaptive mode)

post #1 of 6
Thread Starter 
I found my stable manual voltage to be 1.36v running at 4.7 GHz. After this, I decided to use adaptive mode at 1.25v with an offset of .11v so that I'll have enough voltage for when my CPU is running at max frequency. I tweaked around the adaptive voltage and the offset, however I'm finding that my Vcore in the OS increases in these increments:

1.344v (UEFI set to 1.35)
1.360v (UEFI set to 1.355)
1.376v (UEFI set to 1.355)
1.392v (UEFI set to 1.36)

In order for me to be stable in adaptive mode, I have to set the Vcore in the UEFI which gives me 1.392v in the OS. If I decide to max out at 1.376v, then the Vcore will actually fluctuate between 1.344v and 1.376v which will sometimes cause me to crash. Is there a way to fine tune the settings so I can max out at 1.38v or something? Or should I not worry too much and stick to the fluctuation between 1.36v and 1.39v?
post #2 of 6
Quote:
Originally Posted by Timid View Post

I found my stable manual voltage to be 1.36v running at 4.7 GHz. After this, I decided to use adaptive mode at 1.25v with an offset of .11v so that I'll have enough voltage for when my CPU is running at max frequency. I tweaked around the adaptive voltage and the offset, however I'm finding that my Vcore in the OS increases in these increments:

1.344v (UEFI set to 1.35)
1.360v (UEFI set to 1.355)
1.376v (UEFI set to 1.355)
1.392v (UEFI set to 1.36)

In order for me to be stable in adaptive mode, I have to set the Vcore in the UEFI which gives me 1.392v in the OS. If I decide to max out at 1.376v, then the Vcore will actually fluctuate between 1.344v and 1.376v which will sometimes cause me to crash. Is there a way to fine tune the settings so I can max out at 1.38v or something? Or should I not worry too much and stick to the fluctuation between 1.36v and 1.39v?

I don't really know how to answer you this, but the only time i got precise voltage is when it set it to manual, my adaptive setting is always off by about .0.1-0.05 +/-

beside, I set the max # of the adaptive setting with the offset set to auto, I think what you can try is to fine tune your offset number to the smallest little voltage your motherboard allows
post #3 of 6
Thread Starter 
Quote:
Originally Posted by sammyk View Post

I don't really know how to answer you this, but the only time i got precise voltage is when it set it to manual, my adaptive setting is always off by about .0.1-0.05 +/-

beside, I set the max # of the adaptive setting with the offset set to auto, I think what you can try is to fine tune your offset number to the smallest little voltage your motherboard allows

If I use an Auto offset with 1.36v, then my Vcore can spike all the way up to 1.42 so I prefer the manual offset method. The problem I am having is that regardless of what adaptive voltage or offset I use, my Vcore in the OS jumps in 16mV increments. If I set it to 1.355, it will range from 1.344 to 1.376 which will cause me to crash during stress testing and if I set it to 1.356 it will fluctuate between 1.360 to 1.392 but generally stay in the 1.376/1.392 range which is 16-32 more mV than necessary.

I don't know if it's better to just keep it at a constant 1.36v in manual mode because adaptive mode will drop down to .9-1.2v during idle.
post #4 of 6
Quote:
Originally Posted by Timid View Post

If I use an Auto offset with 1.36v, then my Vcore can spike all the way up to 1.42 so I prefer the manual offset method. The problem I am having is that regardless of what adaptive voltage or offset I use, my Vcore in the OS jumps in 16mV increments. If I set it to 1.355, it will range from 1.344 to 1.376 which will cause me to crash during stress testing and if I set it to 1.356 it will fluctuate between 1.360 to 1.392 but generally stay in the 1.376/1.392 range which is 16-32 more mV than necessary.

I don't know if it's better to just keep it at a constant 1.36v in manual mode because adaptive mode will drop down to .9-1.2v during idle.

personally, I woundn't suggest doing any type of stress test using adaptive mode, I had my 4770k on my old asus board, it would hit 1.5-1.6v while running aida64, heat the cpu up to 95c underwater cool... I now have my new rig running at 1.14 in adaptive voltage, it could sometimes bump up to 1.16 or 1.17, but just for a very little amount of time only when I threw very heavy load at it. It will sit at .7-.9 idle now

but i mean if you can test it that your cpu could run at 1.36v stable under manual, I guess you can turn that back to adaptive after finishing all the stress tests you would like to do, cuz basically nothing could stress your cpu that much in real world situation, thus your cpu may not necessary run at higher voltage at all.
post #5 of 6
Adaptive voltage is best for getting good power consumption at idle and conserving energy. Is your motherboard bios updated? Also, I haven't really played around with this much on my rig but there is something called turbo boost voltage. You may want to explore/research that to see if that will bump the volts between each set voltage.
post #6 of 6
P.S, if your cooling can handle the heat, it's fine to run it at manual, just might me asking, is it a ivy-bridge cpu? I just think that running it at 1.36 might be a bit high, in my standard for normal day to day usage.




I just run a quick check, the min offset voltage on my motherboard is .001, I guess it really depends on what your motherboard is programmed to behavior when under load, mine would give about that much more juice to the cpu, but your might differ, and just like Cakewalk said, I would suggest that you check if there's a newer version of bios for your MB, that's all I could help lol, sorry if nothing helped at all
Edited by sammyk - 2/23/16 at 8:03pm
New Posts  All Forums:Forum Nav:
  Return Home
  Back to Forum: Intel CPUs
Overclock.net › Forums › Intel › Intel CPUs › How can I get a more precise Vcore (Adaptive mode)