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Corsair SF600/SF450 [SFX PSU] - Owners' Club - Page 4

post #31 of 210
Quote:
Originally Posted by nerdcase View Post

Corsair SF600 went in my Silverstone SG13 last night. Living in a tropical country means ambient temps of 25-35 degrees celsius.

Note to all potential owners of Corsair SF600:
This PSU is super loud when the intake temperature is high (very high in my particular case at 55 degrees celsius)

4790K (4.4 ghz all cores @ 1.15v)
EVGA 980ti (100% power target, 1300 mhz)
Push/Pull Magiccool 120mm radiator with GT15

Ambient: 28 Celsius
Exhaust beside / behind case below PSU exhaust: 55 degrees celsius
PSU exhaust didn't feel that warm as it was drawing air from the top vents of the case.

I'll try to loan a SF450 to see how it behaves it under the same punishing conditions.
Tomshardware indicate that it might be a SF600 specific fan profile and the SF450 has a quieter profile.

Thanks for the feedback, would be interesting to see how SF450 behaves with these conditions. thumb.gif
post #32 of 210
Quote:
Quote:
Originally Posted by nerdcase View Post

Corsair SF600 went in my Silverstone SG13 last night. Living in a tropical country means ambient temps of 25-35 degrees celsius.

Note to all potential owners of Corsair SF600:
This PSU is super loud when the intake temperature is high (very high in my particular case at 55 degrees celsius)

4790K (4.4 ghz all cores @ 1.15v)
EVGA 980ti (100% power target, 1300 mhz)
Push/Pull Magiccool 120mm radiator with GT15

Ambient: 28 Celsius
Exhaust beside / behind case below PSU exhaust: 55 degrees celsius
PSU exhaust didn't feel that warm as it was drawing air from the top vents of the case.

I'll try to loan a SF450 to see how it behaves it under the same punishing conditions.
Tomshardware indicate that it might be a SF600 specific fan profile and the SF450 has a quieter profile.

You have those radiator fans pushing air OUT of the case or sucking the air from the radiator into the case?
post #33 of 210
Quote:
Originally Posted by jonnyGURU View Post


You have those radiator fans pushing air OUT of the case or sucking the air from the radiator into the case?

Top view / birds eye view

Front of SG13
GT15
Fan Filter
Magicool 120mm
GT15



| | | | |
V V V V V


ITX Mobo
Corsair SF600

Rear of SG15



| | | | |
V V V V V


Blue = sandwich
post #34 of 210
Quote:
Originally Posted by nerdcase View Post

Top view / birds eye view

Front of SG13
GT15
Fan Filter
Magicool 120mm
GT15



| | | | |
V V V V V


ITX Mobo
Corsair SF600

Rear of SG15



| | | | |
V V V V V


Blue = sandwich

That makes ZERO sense to me.
post #35 of 210
Quote:
Originally Posted by jonnyGURU View Post

That makes ZERO sense to me.

redface.gif**needs to improve on communication skills** redface.gif

Intake from front

Exhaust from rear (from positive pressure from front intake)

Orange down pointing arrow = warm air
Edited by nerdcase - 5/13/16 at 9:40pm
post #36 of 210
So you're heating up the intake care with your radiator?

Yikes!

No wonder that PSU fan is going full speed ahead.

I'd flip that whole configuration.
post #37 of 210
Quote:
Originally Posted by jonnyGURU View Post

So you're heating up the intake care with your radiator?

Yikes!

No wonder that PSU fan is going full speed ahead.

I'd flip that whole configuration.

Intake from the front is filtered, a requirement given the environment that the PC is in.

I have made a "spacer" out of cardboard to limit the air intake of the PSU to the top vents of the case only. It helped significantly. Fan still spins up under load. but not to the same speed as before. Significantly quieter now. biggrin.gif

PSU
Load: 350-380 watts
Ambient = 30C
Intake = 33.8C,
Exhaust: = 36.5C
Delta = 2.7C

I'll say there's significantly headroom for the fan profile to be relaxed

As per what you said: Hot the PSU intake = Fan working hard.
post #38 of 210
Fan configuration has been flipped. Push Pull fans intake air from inside casing and exhaust to the front. PSU is mounted in case with fan facing up.

However the situation is quite similar. The SF600's fan would spin up to very high speeds at moderate load. 400 watts average peaking at 500 watts or so. Ambient is around 25 degrees to 33 degrees celsius.

With a super cool exhaust temperature of barely 1 degree higher than intake temperature, the PSU fan is noisy enough to be heard when I am wearing IEMs playing games.. It drowns out twin GT15s and the DDC pump by +8db (according to Mobile phone + SPL Meter app).

Once the fan has spin up and is no longer idle, it will NOT stop spinning even after the computer is on a low load idling for 30+ mins. I'm not sure if it is defective or a 'feature"

I intend to sell it and either go back to ATX PSU or try another small SFX/ SFX-L psu.


Any owners in cooler climates thus far? What are your experience with post load fan speeds?
post #39 of 210
Hey guys, I have the Corsair SF600 in a Coolermaster Elite 130 and the amount of hot air it blows out the rear is insane. Are SFX PSU's suppose to be this hot?

It's literally heating up my warm and I am sweating.
post #40 of 210
Quote:
Originally Posted by nerdcase View Post

Intake from the front is filtered, a requirement given the environment that the PC is in.

It wouldn't need to be filtered if you were blowing out the front.

Essentially, the only fans you have are sucking hot air through a hot radiator and the PSU is the only exhaust for the whole case. Honestly, it sounds like ANY PSU you have in there would suffer from the fan having to run faster because it's having to take care of all of the heat in your system.
Quote:
Originally Posted by XxAlbertoxX View Post

Hey guys, I have the Corsair SF600 in a Coolermaster Elite 130 and the amount of hot air it blows out the rear is insane. Are SFX PSU's suppose to be this hot?

It's literally heating up my warm and I am sweating.

It's not generating heat. It's moving heat. If the PSU were generating more heat, it wouldn't be as efficient as it is as AC that is not converted to DC in a less efficient PSU is exhausted as heat. So, odds are, the heat you're feeling is the PSU trying to get rid of the heat generated from your other components.
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