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Transporting with the Noctua D15 attached - Page 3

post #21 of 45
Thread Starter 
Thanks for the confirmation. I felt worried even leaving it there with them, and I even asked the guy who I talked with to hand-tighten the cooler only. But another guy ended up doing the work and of course the guy I talked to didn't leave any notes for the one who worked on it. I also asked them to use the Noctua paste that came with the cooler but of course I have no way of knowing if they really did, other than checking the tube for signs of use.

I'm thinking the best I can do now is remove the cooler and check for damage, and re-install the cooler myself, leaving the CPU alone. But if these dummies don't know how to install a Noctua cooler, how can I be sure they installed the CPU safely? The whole reason I brought it there was because although I do understand how to do it, I didn't feel confident with installing the CPU without bending the pins. My first PC 5 years ago went without a hitch but this one gave me some trouble. Now I'm wondering if I made a mistake bringing it there.
post #22 of 45
Thread Starter 
Quote:
Originally Posted by JackCY View Post

Just remove the cooler for transport if you are worried.

At this point I'm wondering if he cracked the motherboard or applied too much pressure on the CPU - the damage may have already been done. Hopefully that Noctua mount did its job and prevented over-tightening. I don't know how that mount holds up against an electric screwdriver. I know it's supposed to prevent over-tightening but I don't know how crazy that guy went with the electric screwdriver. He told me he's done this many times (not specifically the Noctua - just PCs in general), but right from the start I felt uneasy leaving it with them. It's running now overnight at their shop which makes me a bit worried too - no supervision.
Edited by miles17 - 6/19/16 at 4:27pm
post #23 of 45
Quote:
Originally Posted by miles17 View Post

At this point I'm wondering if he cracked the motherboard or applied too much pressure on the CPU - the damage may have already been done. Hopefully that Noctua mount did its job and prevented over-tightening. I don't know how that mount holds up against an electric screwdriver. I know it's supposed to prevent over-tightening but I don't know how crazy that guy went with the electric screwdriver. He told me he's done this many times (not specifically the Noctua - just PCs in general), but right from the start I felt uneasy leaving it with them. It's running now overnight at their shop which makes me a bit worried too - no supervision.

You are safe there, the Noctua mount would strip or break prior to over tightening. Just get your PC home and lose that number.
post #24 of 45
Thread Starter 
Quote:
Originally Posted by ciarlatano View Post

You are safe there, the Noctua mount would strip or break prior to over tightening. Just get your PC home and lose that number.

Glad to hear, but are you talking about just those 2 center front screws (with the tension springs), or does this apply to the 4 backplate screws also? Because what if he used the power screwdriver on those 4 backplate screws? Could tht crack the motherboard? He didn't actually tell me which screws he used the power screwdriver on, so I have to assume he may have used it on all of them unless I can get him to tell me which ones he used it on.
post #25 of 45
Quote:
Originally Posted by miles17 View Post

Glad to hear, but are you talking about just those 2 center front screws (with the tension springs), or does this apply to the 4 backplate screws also? Because what if he used the power screwdriver on those 4 backplate screws? Could tht crack the motherboard? He didn't actually tell me which screws he used the power screwdriver on, so I have to assume he may have used it on all of them unless I can get him to tell me which ones he used it on.

It applies to all of them.
post #26 of 45
Quote:
Originally Posted by miles17 View Post

At this point I'm wondering if he cracked the motherboard or applied too much pressure on the CPU - the damage may have already been done. Hopefully that Noctua mount did its job and prevented over-tightening. I don't know how that mount holds up against an electric screwdriver. I know it's supposed to prevent over-tightening but I don't know how crazy that guy went with the electric screwdriver. He told me he's done this many times (not specifically the Noctua - just PCs in general), but right from the start I felt uneasy leaving it with them. It's running now overnight at their shop which makes me a bit worried too - no supervision.
Using electric screwdriver is not really a problem. How it is used is what makes the difference, just like a regular screwdriver.

Like ciarlatano said, the motherboard is not damaged. Worst case would be the mount itself is damaged.
post #27 of 45
Thread Starter 
Okay, good to hear. I'll try not to worry too much but I can't help it since I wasn't there to see what he did. I asked them specifically to hand-tighten only. The guy told me on the phone last night that this cooler is steel and a better cooler would have been copper, and said several times that the stock cooler would have been adequate, even after I explained to him that I live in a 3rd floor apartment which gets very hot in the summer even with air conditioning. In fact, when I dropped it off the first thing the guy at the counter asked me is if I had the stock cooler instead! I don't understand how they are supposed to be a PC shop and yet they aren't even familiar with Noctua mounts. That shop has been there for ages - scary.
post #28 of 45
Thread Starter 
Quote:
Originally Posted by doyll View Post

Worst case would be the mount itself is damaged.

Meaning what specifically? What should I look for when I pick it up? At this point, part of me says as long as it posts and everything is working, I should leave it all alone. But since I'll be adding the video card and components, and some of the additional wiring, I think I should at least inspect the mount, but I doubt if there would be anything I could see anyways.
post #29 of 45
Quote:
Originally Posted by miles17 View Post

Okay, good to hear. I'll try not to worry too much but I can't help it since I wasn't there to see what he did. I asked them specifically to hand-tighten only. The guy told me on the phone last night that this cooler is steel and a better cooler would have been copper, and said several times that the stock cooler would have been adequate, even after I explained to him that I live in a 3rd floor apartment which gets very hot in the summer even with air conditioning. In fact, when I dropped it off the first thing the guy at the counter asked me is if I had the stock cooler instead! I don't understand how they are supposed to be a PC shop and yet they aren't even familiar with Noctua mounts. That shop has been there for ages - scary.
The only steel in that cooler is the mounting bracket. Everything else is copper, aluminum, lead solder and a very thin coat of plating to give it a shiny silver look. Whoever they are, they have no idea what computers are made of or how cooler work.
Quote:
Originally Posted by miles17 View Post

Meaning what specifically? What should I look for when I pick it up? At this point, part of me says as long as it posts and everything is working, I should leave it all alone. But since I'll be adding the video card and components, and some of the additional wiring, I think I should at least inspect the mount, but I doubt if there would be anything I could see anyways.
If it can be taken apart and put back together everything is fine.
post #30 of 45
Thread Starter 
Quote:
Originally Posted by doyll View Post

The only steel in that cooler is the mounting bracket. Everything else is copper, aluminum, lead solder and a very thin coat of plating to give it a shiny silver look. Whoever they are, they have no idea what computers are made of or how cooler work.


If it can be taken apart and put back together everything is fine.

Yeah, I was just on the Noctua site this minute and read this in their FAQ:

"The base of Noctua CPU coolers is made from hard-wearing nickel plated copper"

Wow, this PC shop is unbelievable. Everything they have told me is wrong.
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