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Multiple Case fan Power supply - Page 2

post #11 of 16
Both the 3-pin and 4-pin fans get their power through the second pin. It's 12 Volt.

With the 3-pin fans you have, when you want to control those, what happens is that you need to change those 12V. You reduce it and the fan runs slower. With that fan control product you found, it will change the 12V into something else when you turn the knob. This thing will be manual. There's no way to change anything automatic with software.

If you'd have 4-pin fans, those get a PWM signal on the fourth pin that changes their speed. They want constant 12V on the second pin. That PWM splitter product you found that uses Molex power from the PSU can only work with that idea. It has no electronics in it, it's just a bunch of wires without logic. It will always wire 12V to the second pins of all fans that are connected. This means if you connect 3-pin fans, they will run at their full speed always, and there's no way to control them.

Looking at that PDF file about your motherboard you linked to, there was a sentence in there that said the 4-pin fan headers all do PWM signal. I would then guess those fan headers are not good to control a 3-pin fan. The way I read it, I would expect the second pin to supply a constant 12V, so 3-pin fans will always only run at their full speed. What you could do with your motherboard is use that Phanteks fan hub thingy. It's this here:

http://www.newegg.com/Product/Product.aspx?Item=N82E16811984004&cm_re=phanteks_fan_hub-_-11-984-004-_-Product

What it does is, it takes in 12V from the PSU, and it takes in a PWM signal from a motherboard fan header. It uses the PWM signal to transform the 12V and control 3-pin fans. This thing is intended to be used to control everything through software. You would use a software that came with your motherboard, or you would maybe use BIOS settings, or you would try to use a program called "SpeedFan". It's about programming something that will change the speed of fans automatically depending on temperature readings, not manual changes.
Edited by deepor - 6/22/16 at 5:16pm
post #12 of 16
Thread Starter 
I have another computer and it has a MSI Gaming 7 Z97A mobo. It has 4 pin PWM headers on it on all of its fan connectors and I have 3 pin fans on it and I control them through the MSI provided fan control.

I dont want PWM control I want to set the fans at 1 speed and not have them rev but I also want to turn them down if I choose. If I use a fan controller I can do that but I also want to monitor the speed through software. So I need a signal to go into the mobo. That PWM splitter product that I found uses Molex power from the PSU but it says that it also works with 3 and 4 pin fans So if I plug that connector in I will be able to see the fan rpms and I can also hook to the fan controller to change the speed as I want . Does that sound right?
post #13 of 16
I tried thinking through this problem (tried to think about what connectors there are and what will plug into what), and I don't think that's possible, seeing the speed on the motherboard while using the fan controller for manual control. I think if you use the fan controller, you won't know what's going on (you would just listen to the noise changing). I don't see how you would add the PWM splitter to the setup.
post #14 of 16
Thread Starter 
OK How bout this. Install the fan controller here is a link for it http://www.newegg.com/Product/Product.aspx?Item=N82E16817182348&ignorebbr=1&cm_re=fan_controller-_-17-182-348-_-Product plug it into main power http://i1024.photobucket.com/albums/y301/jason_hash1/Fan%20COntrol_zpstveupdak.png as seen in picture. Then use this connector http://www.newegg.com/Product/Product.aspx?Item=N82E16812423164&ignorebbr=1 and plug it into the fan wire here as seen in photo http://i1024.photobucket.com/albums/y301/jason_hash1/Fan_zpsnztmee6y.png Would that provide manual control and give a signal? The controller would provide the power and the power supply and limiter would be betwenn the fans and the power they receive??????????????
post #15 of 16
Quote:
Originally Posted by deepor View Post

.

Agree. tongue.gif
post #16 of 16
Quote:
Originally Posted by Magnarider View Post

OK How bout this. Install the fan controller here is a link for it http://www.newegg.com/Product/Product.aspx?Item=N82E16817182348&ignorebbr=1&cm_re=fan_controller-_-17-182-348-_-Product plug it into main power http://i1024.photobucket.com/albums/y301/jason_hash1/Fan%20COntrol_zpstveupdak.png as seen in picture. Then use this connector http://www.newegg.com/Product/Product.aspx?Item=N82E16812423164&ignorebbr=1 and plug it into the fan wire here as seen in photo http://i1024.photobucket.com/albums/y301/jason_hash1/Fan_zpsnztmee6y.png Would that provide manual control and give a signal? The controller would provide the power and the power supply and limiter would be betwenn the fans and the power they receive??????????????

If you're ok with splicing wires, can cut each fan cable and run a single wire from each fan's rpm line to an empty fan header on the MB so its speed can be reported. However, in that case, might as well run each fan to its own header. But, you have more fans than headers. So the compromise is:

A) Don't worry about the fan speed, just monitor the temps and adjust the fans manually to the least annoying noise level.

B) Spend a bit more for a fan controller that displays the fan speed on the controller's LCD.

C) Build the system first, test it in-situ to determine how many fans are actually required. Then start the posting process all over again. biggrin.gif
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