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XMP enabled on Gigabyte Gaming 7 overclocks CPU - Page 2

post #11 of 30
Thread Starter 
Thanks for sharing all that advice. Some of it makes my head spin which is why I didn't really want to bother with overclocking to begin with. I know it can be exciting and fun for some but these days I just want my PC to run cool and stable and I'm happy. Coming from my old 2.7Ghz CPU the Skylake is a miracle. No need to push it any farther.

So if I disable XMP leaving the memory at 2133, the CPU at 4.2GHz on Auto and the vcore at 1.26 everything should be stable and safe? I just wasn't sure the vcore was enough at 1.26 with the CPU running at turbo by default. If it's okay then I'm just going to leave XMP disabled and not worry about the minor difference between 2133 vs 2400.
Edited by miles17 - 6/24/16 at 1:07pm
post #12 of 30
Thread Starter 
I did follow your suggestion and enabled EIST but it made no difference, at least in the UEFI BIOS. Enabling it made no difference to temps, vcore or CPU frequency, both with XMP enabled and disabled. Setting EIST back to auto made no difference so I've left it on auto. I'm thinking leaving XMP off is the way to go to make it easiest on myself, as long as the vcore at 1.26 isn't too low for the CPU running at 4.2GHz.
post #13 of 30
Quote:
Originally Posted by miles17 View Post

I did follow your suggestion and enabled EIST but it made no difference, at least in the UEFI BIOS. Enabling it made no difference to temps, vcore or CPU frequency, both with XMP enabled and disabled. Setting EIST back to auto made no difference so I've left it on auto. I'm thinking leaving XMP off is the way to go to make it easiest on myself, as long as the vcore at 1.26 isn't too low for the CPU running at 4.2GHz.

If you leave everything at defaults (including memory), it should be stable and cool. You definitely want EIST enabled (it is by default) because it underclocks your CPU when not in a workload. I don't own the 6700k but have the 6600k. Same CPU without hyper-threading and a slower factory clock (as well as smaller cache). 1.26v sounds about right for 4.2Ghz.
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post #14 of 30
Thread Starter 
EIST was on Auto by default. I'm guessing it's enabled. I'll just leave everything at the defaults then.
post #15 of 30
Quote:
Originally Posted by miles17 View Post

I see. But I really didn't want to get into overclocking and voltages. That's why I just wanted to do a quick XMP to bump the memory to 2400 and leave it at that. Now it seems I might have to start playing with settings which I don't want to do. I have no experience with overclocking which is why I didn't want to get into it. 4.0GHz/4.2Ghz is plenty fast enough for me.

I just don't want the vcore to be too high now. Either way the CPU is running at 4.2GHz. Would it make sense then to just leave the memory at 2133 and leave it at that? this way the vcore is running at 1.26 and should be stable. Or is 1.26 not enough for the CPU to be running at 4.2GHz? I don't want to have to start spending hours or days running stability tests back and forth for zero gain in CPU performance. The only benefit with XMP is bumping the memory to 2400 and that comes at a cost of a higher vcore which then I'd need to experiment with to see how low I can lower it safely. I think I'd rather just disable XMP and not worry about it since from what I've been reading today the difference between 2133 vs 2400 is negligible at best anyways.

Sorry for all the questions. Like I said I'm inexperienced with overclocking and I didn't want to be bothering with this, Now I"m worried that the vcore may be too high or low depending on what I set XMP to. You would think whatever XMP sets the vcore to should be safe, but I guess it bumps it up too high?

Either way you should be fine. As long as you aren't using the stock CPU cooler I would enable XMP. The voltage is going to be on the high side, but not dangerous. 1.3 is fine. High temps are your enemy not necessarily voltage.

EDIT: thiussat is correct. If you want quite, cool, stable, and no worries just leave XMP off. You wont notice it and it sounds like it will give you the best peace of mind.
Edited by GBT-MatthewH - 6/24/16 at 3:48pm
post #16 of 30
You probably won't notice any difference between 2133 and 2400 anyway.

The other option is to manually change the settings for the ram instead of using XMP.

Which on the Gigabyte... you need to change a bios setting so you can enter the few timings you might need to change. Out of the box you can't just enter a memory timing page like some other boards. You actually have to enable a manual timing option and then you can change them.

Possibly change the ram voltage (tho one would think 2400 would still run at the default 1.2v).

and... on these boards instead of having a drop down box for the speed you want (like asus/msi etc) you have to change a memory multiplier setting. Which pretty much at stock is set to 21.33 (or something like that) and you would change it to 24.... for 2400 ram. <- examples are for the standard 100.00 bus aka 21.33 x 100 = 2133 etc

*edit* I should have ended by saying... So as the others have said.. the easiest thing is likely just leaving the stock settings.
Edited by Digitalwolf - 6/25/16 at 4:06am
post #17 of 30
Thread Starter 
I appreciate all the advice from everyone. Thank you. I'm leaving XMP off and calling it a day. I was thinking about EIST and I'm not sure it has any effect on my new PC, unless I'm misunderstanding what it does - because when I enabled it in the BIOS and rebooted, the BIOS was still reporting the CPU running at 4.2GHz with EIST enabled. Shouldn't EIST have downclocked it since it was just in idle in the BIOS?

I'm still not quite sure why the CPU is locked into running constantly at 4.2GHz even in idle in the BIOS because I thought that 4.2 was boost mode only, when needed. But maybe I'm misunderstanding how that works? Is the 1.26 vcore enough to handle the CPU locked into 4.2GHz steadily? Everything is pretty much set on auto at this point so I'd imagine everything should be good. But then XMP bumps up the vcore a bit too high so auto can't always be trusted I guess.
Edited by miles17 - 6/25/16 at 6:54am
post #18 of 30
Quote:
Originally Posted by miles17 View Post

I appreciate all the advice from everyone. Thank you. I'm leaving XMP off and calling it a day. I was thinking about EIST and I'm not sure it has any effect on my new PC, unless I'm misunderstanding what it does - because when I enabled it in the BIOS and rebooted, the BIOS was still reporting the CPU running at 4.2GHz with EIST enabled. Shouldn't EIST have downclocked it since it was just in idle in the BIOS?

I'm still not quite sure why the CPU is locked into running constantly at 4.2GHz even in idle in the BIOS because I thought that 4.2 was boost mode only, when needed. But maybe I'm misunderstanding how that works? Is the 1.26 vcore enough to handle the CPU locked into 4.2GHz steadily? Everything is pretty much set on auto at this point so I'd imagine everything should be good. But then XMP bumps up the vcore a bit too high so auto can't always be trusted I guess.

It's normal. My 6600k is stocked clocked to 3.5Ghz (3.9 turbo) and in the BIOS it always shows it as 3.9Ghz when everything is set to default. EIST really only works once you load the OS.
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Skylake Build
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Intel Core i5-6600k Gigabyte Z-170 Gaming 7 Gigabyte R9 390  Gskill Ripjaws V DDR4 
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Samsung 850 Evo Corsair H115i Windows 10 Pro Asus  
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post #19 of 30
Thread Starter 
Quote:
Originally Posted by thiussat View Post

It's normal. My 6600k is stocked clocked to 3.5Ghz (3.9 turbo) and in the BIOS it always shows it as 3.9Ghz when everything is set to default. EIST really only works once you load the OS.

Oh, that explains it then. Thank you again to everyone that helped me in here.

EDIT: I did read in another thread that in Gigabyte motherboards, voltage has to be set to "OFFSET voltage to make EIST work, it wont work in fixed voltage.". I'm not going to worry about it. It's set to auto and I'll leave it at that.
Edited by miles17 - 6/26/16 at 7:30am
post #20 of 30
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