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Overclocking i5-3570k to 4.2 GHz, do these numbers look OK?

post #1 of 36
Thread Starter 
Hi all, thanks for taking the time to look here. Decided to take the plunge and finally try to squeeze some extra juice out of my 4 year old 3570k. My numbers and questions below.
Setup:
CPU: i5-3570k
Mobo: Asrock Z77 Pro4
Cooler: CM Hyper 212 Evo

I left voltages on Auto for the time being and simply raised the multiplier to 42. Didn't change any other settings.

Results @ 4.2 GHz after Prime95 testing for 10 minutes:

http://i.imgur.com/DXvkZw9.png



- Do these temperatures look OK?
- Does the VCORE at max 1.24 V look OK? Is this voltage level bad for CPU longevity?
- I'm a bit concerned about the delta between "VCORE" and "VID". From googling around, I've seen that VID is not the actual voltage, and is more of a "requested" voltage, whereas VCORE is the actual voltage. Am I safe in just ignoring the VID value?
- Should I be concerned that there is such a large voltage drop off between VID and VCORE?

Thanks for your feedback!
post #2 of 36

Hey adequatelength. Welcome to OCN!

 

Those temperatures are safe, but they are higher than what you'd expect for only 4.2 GHz.

 

The voltage is safe, but it's probably a lot higher than it needs to be for only 4.2 GHz. This is due to using Auto.

 

The VID is just the voltage that the CPU should need for that clock and that multiplier. That's really all it is. It's not a number that you can change, so you can pretty much ignore it.

It's a computer!
(19 items)
 
  
CPUMotherboardGraphicsRAM
i5-2500K @ 4.5GHz (1.368-1.384V fixed voltage) ASUS P8P67 EVO B3 (UEFI ver. 1850) GTX 780 ASUS DirectCU II (1228 / 6300, 1.180V) G.SKILL Ripjaws X 8GB (2 x 4GB) 1866MHz, CL9 
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It's a computer!
(19 items)
 
  
CPUMotherboardGraphicsRAM
i5-2500K @ 4.5GHz (1.368-1.384V fixed voltage) ASUS P8P67 EVO B3 (UEFI ver. 1850) GTX 780 ASUS DirectCU II (1228 / 6300, 1.180V) G.SKILL Ripjaws X 8GB (2 x 4GB) 1866MHz, CL9 
Hard DriveHard DriveHard DriveOptical Drive
250 GB Samsung 840 EVO (C:\) 250 GB Samsung 840 EVO (D:\) 150 GB WD VelociRaptor Samsung SH-S243N 24x DVD Burner 
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Filco Majestouch 104-key Cherry MX Blues w/NKRO Corsair HX650 (Bronze, ordered on 12-12-2009) CM 690 Intellimouse Optical (1.1A) 1000Hz polling rate 
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post #3 of 36
Thread Starter 
Hi TwoCables, thanks for the welcome and for your feedback.

Yes, it seems Auto does kick the voltage higher than needed, even at stock frequencies I saw Vcore around 1.16V. Do you think this is playing a part in the seemingly higher than normal temps for my 4.2 GHz clock?. Unfortunately my BIOS doesn't allow a manual voltage setting so I'd have to tinker with negative offsets to lower this.

Would it be OK, in terms of my CPU's health, to leave the voltage as is in the picture around 1.2-1.24 V? I'd prefer to not tinker with settings if I don't need to.

You also mentioned that my Vcore voltage is a lot higher than it needs to be @ 4.2 GHz, but then also said the VID (which is higher then the actual Vcore) is the voltage the CPU should need. I am confused as this seems to contradict. Is this a result of Intel programming a conservative VID into the CPU to be higher than the actual needed Vcore in real practice?

Thanks again for taking the time to respond!
post #4 of 36
I just overclocked my 3570k last week. There are some good guides on ocn for ivy bridge overclocking. Try reducing your pll voltage to reduce your temps if you cant reduce your vcore any further without loosing stability. 80degrees is fine for stress testing conditions. You wont reach anywhere near that in real usage

Edit: sorry didnt realise you left voltages on auto. If you want lower temps you will have to manually set voltages. Those temps and volts are fine if you dont want to set manually. Wont do any harm!
Edited by mastablades - 6/26/16 at 3:16am
post #5 of 36
Quote:
Originally Posted by adequatelength View Post

Hi TwoCables, thanks for the welcome and for your feedback.

Yes, it seems Auto does kick the voltage higher than needed, even at stock frequencies I saw Vcore around 1.16V. Do you think this is playing a part in the seemingly higher than normal temps for my 4.2 GHz clock?. Unfortunately my BIOS doesn't allow a manual voltage setting so I'd have to tinker with negative offsets to lower this.

Would it be OK, in terms of my CPU's health, to leave the voltage as is in the picture around 1.2-1.24 V? I'd prefer to not tinker with settings if I don't need to.

You also mentioned that my Vcore voltage is a lot higher than it needs to be @ 4.2 GHz, but then also said the VID (which is higher then the actual Vcore) is the voltage the CPU should need. I am confused as this seems to contradict. Is this a result of Intel programming a conservative VID into the CPU to be higher than the actual needed Vcore in real practice?

Thanks again for taking the time to respond!

 

You're welcome!

 

I forgot to say that yeah, the higher voltage is the cause for the temps.

 

A negative offset may or may not give you the results your after. The offset setting starts "behind the scenes" using the VID and then adding or subtracting a certain amount of voltage (your offset). It's an offset off of the VID. So, that's where the VID can come in to play for us. It's not as simple though as adding or subtracting; you have to take into account vDroop. VDroop is when the voltage droops down under heavier loads (your light-loading situations result in a higher voltage).

 

That voltage is safe (and if you end up wondering why I didn't tell you before, it's in my first reply).

 

The VID is just supposed to be what the CPU should need, but we overclockers usually find that this isn't the case. I don't know how they arrive at the VID though.

It's a computer!
(19 items)
 
  
CPUMotherboardGraphicsRAM
i5-2500K @ 4.5GHz (1.368-1.384V fixed voltage) ASUS P8P67 EVO B3 (UEFI ver. 1850) GTX 780 ASUS DirectCU II (1228 / 6300, 1.180V) G.SKILL Ripjaws X 8GB (2 x 4GB) 1866MHz, CL9 
Hard DriveHard DriveHard DriveOptical Drive
250 GB Samsung 840 EVO (C:\) 250 GB Samsung 840 EVO (D:\) 150 GB WD VelociRaptor Samsung SH-S243N 24x DVD Burner 
Optical DriveCoolingOSMonitor
Samsung SH-S203N 20X DVD Burner Thermaltake Frio Win 7 Home Premium x64 SP1 Retail AOC G2460PG (24" 1920 x 1080 144Hz G-SYNC) 
KeyboardPowerCaseMouse
Filco Majestouch 104-key Cherry MX Blues w/NKRO Corsair HX650 (Bronze, ordered on 12-12-2009) CM 690 Intellimouse Optical (1.1A) 1000Hz polling rate 
Mouse PadAudioAudio
Basic, but premium round X-Fi Titanium HD Klipsch ProMedia 2.1 (with 16 AWG Monster Cable... 
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It's a computer!
(19 items)
 
  
CPUMotherboardGraphicsRAM
i5-2500K @ 4.5GHz (1.368-1.384V fixed voltage) ASUS P8P67 EVO B3 (UEFI ver. 1850) GTX 780 ASUS DirectCU II (1228 / 6300, 1.180V) G.SKILL Ripjaws X 8GB (2 x 4GB) 1866MHz, CL9 
Hard DriveHard DriveHard DriveOptical Drive
250 GB Samsung 840 EVO (C:\) 250 GB Samsung 840 EVO (D:\) 150 GB WD VelociRaptor Samsung SH-S243N 24x DVD Burner 
Optical DriveCoolingOSMonitor
Samsung SH-S203N 20X DVD Burner Thermaltake Frio Win 7 Home Premium x64 SP1 Retail AOC G2460PG (24" 1920 x 1080 144Hz G-SYNC) 
KeyboardPowerCaseMouse
Filco Majestouch 104-key Cherry MX Blues w/NKRO Corsair HX650 (Bronze, ordered on 12-12-2009) CM 690 Intellimouse Optical (1.1A) 1000Hz polling rate 
Mouse PadAudioAudio
Basic, but premium round X-Fi Titanium HD Klipsch ProMedia 2.1 (with 16 AWG Monster Cable... 
  hide details  
Reply
post #6 of 36
Thread Starter 
Quote:
Originally Posted by mastablades View Post

I just overclocked my 3570k last week. There are some good guides on ocn for ivy bridge overclocking. Try reducing your pll voltage to reduce your temps if you cant reduce your vcore any further without loosing stability. 80degrees is fine for stress testing conditions. You wont reach anywhere near that in real usage

Edit: sorry didnt realise you left voltages on auto. If you want lower temps you will have to manually set voltages. Those temps and volts are fine if you dont want to set manually. Wont do any harm!

Thanks for your input! Maybe you won't be able to answer this exactly, but for the 3570k what voltage would you consider safe but not significantly degrading the CPU? I'd like to squeeze a little extra life out of my 3570k but don't want to do it at the expense of a huge lifetime decrease.
post #7 of 36
Thread Starter 
Quote:
Originally Posted by TwoCables View Post

You're welcome!

I forgot to say that yeah, the higher voltage is the cause for the temps.

A negative offset may or may not give you the results your after. The offset setting starts "behind the scenes" using the VID and then adding or subtracting a certain amount of voltage (your offset). It's an offset off of the VID. So, that's where the VID can come in to play for us. It's not as simple though as adding or subtracting; you have to take into account vDroop. VDroop is when the voltage droops down under heavier loads (your light-loading situations result in a higher voltage).

That voltage is safe (and if you end up wondering why I didn't tell you before, it's in my first reply).

The VID is just supposed to be what the CPU should need, but we overclockers usually find that this isn't the case. I don't know how they arrive at the VID though.

Thank you again for your feedback!

So I am just curious now that you mention it, do you know what causes Vdroop? Electrical resistive losses? Is it normal to have such a large Vdroop between the VID and Vcore as mine is? (Is this indicative of a poorly performing motherboard?)

Thanks for confirming the voltage is safe. From what I've seen people recommend 1.5 V as an absolute max for the 3570k, so it seems I'm OK in that regard. I'd like to use this computer for another 4-5 years if possible (just picked up a new GTX 1070 biggrin.gif). So 1.24 V is safe, would you say it's low enough to where I don't need to worry that i'm significantly shortening my CPU's lifespan?

Finally, I've been focusing only on Temps/VCore to determine health/safety. Are there any other important parameters (other BIOS settings, other voltages, etc) that I need to check to make sure everything is OK? Or am I pretty good with just these two (Temperature, VCORE)?

Thanks again for considering my questions!! redface.gif I really appreciate it.
post #8 of 36
Quote:
Originally Posted by adequatelength View Post


Thank you again for your feedback!

So I am just curious now that you mention it, do you know what causes Vdroop? Electrical resistive losses? Is it normal to have such a large Vdroop between the VID and Vcore as mine is? (Is this indicative of a poorly performing motherboard?)

Thanks for confirming the voltage is safe. From what I've seen people recommend 1.5 V as an absolute max for the 3570k, so it seems I'm OK in that regard. I'd like to use this computer for another 4-5 years if possible (just picked up a new GTX 1070 biggrin.gif). So 1.24 V is safe, would you say it's low enough to where I don't need to worry that i'm significantly shortening my CPU's lifespan?

Finally, I've been focusing only on Temps/VCore to determine health/safety. Are there any other important parameters (other BIOS settings, other voltages, etc) that I need to check to make sure everything is OK? Or am I pretty good with just these two (Temperature, VCORE)?

Thanks again for considering my questions!! redface.gif I really appreciate it.

 

You're quite welcome, adequatelength!

 

Intel designed CPUs to have vDroop. This is kind of a safety feature so that dangerous micro spikes in voltage don't happen. On the lowest quality motherboards (like boards that shouldn't be used for overclocking lol), eliminating vDroop can result in these spikes and they're impossible to see without special equipment to monitor the voltage. Fortunately, today's boards that are safe for overclocking - like yours - don't allow this problem to occur. So, eliminating vDroop is pretty much safe because the motherboard is designed to make it safe.

 

You asked if it's normal to have such a large vDroop between the VID and the vCore. The VID isn't an actual voltage that is being supplied to the CPU. It's just a specification, more or less. It's what the voltage probably needs to be at in order to keep the CPU stable at that clock and at that multiplier - even though we usually find that we can set the voltage much lower, probably thanks to our good motherboards. The only time you need to pay any attention to the VID is when calculating what your Offset voltage should be set to in order to achieve your desired voltage at full load. With absolutely no vDroop, this can be a very simple mathematical calculation. With some vDroop though, it's not quite as simple as that - but it's still easy. Of course, you could just set the Offset blindly and then experiment, but that's harder and more time-consuming. Yet, that's the way most people do it because almost no one knows any better and so almost no one is teaching it.

 

Ivy Bridge's voltages are a funny thing. Some Ivy Bridge CPUs have a safe voltage range that's very similar to Sandy Bridge while others have a much lower range. The ones with the lower range tend to do enable about 4.5 GHz with roughly the same voltage you're using, or lower. The ones with the range that's similar to Sandy Bridge need well over 1.3V, like closer to 1.35V. All these voltages that I am talking about are only as seen in CPU-Z while the CPU is under full load. I'm not talking about the voltage setting in the BIOS. You want to always go by what CPU-Z shows you under full load.

 

Even so, degradation won't occur if all you're doing is gaming. There's a guy here on OCN named $ilent who experienced degradation to his Sandy Bridge CPU, but it was only because he had his voltage at about 1.408V, his clock at about 4.8 or 4.9 or maybe it was 5 GHz, and he had a full-load on it 24/7 for several months. Yeah, several months, like, easily longer than half a year. I think he was Folding or Mining. I forget which. Anyway, the degradation was so bad that he had to drop is clock down a few hundred MHz so that he didn't have to increase his voltage. Other than that, his CPU was still fine - just not quite as awesome of an overclocker anymore. It was no big real really. Degradation isn't quite as horrible as it might sound.

 

So, whichever of the two safe ranges your CPU has, you have nothing to worry about at all. Even if you have the lower of the two ranges, your still well within the safe area.

 

Regarding other things to make sure you pay attention to, I'm not 100% sure when it comes to Ivy Bridge. Sure, both Sandy and Ivy Bridge are very similar, but even so I'll have to leave this one up to someone who can give you a more confident answer.

It's a computer!
(19 items)
 
  
CPUMotherboardGraphicsRAM
i5-2500K @ 4.5GHz (1.368-1.384V fixed voltage) ASUS P8P67 EVO B3 (UEFI ver. 1850) GTX 780 ASUS DirectCU II (1228 / 6300, 1.180V) G.SKILL Ripjaws X 8GB (2 x 4GB) 1866MHz, CL9 
Hard DriveHard DriveHard DriveOptical Drive
250 GB Samsung 840 EVO (C:\) 250 GB Samsung 840 EVO (D:\) 150 GB WD VelociRaptor Samsung SH-S243N 24x DVD Burner 
Optical DriveCoolingOSMonitor
Samsung SH-S203N 20X DVD Burner Thermaltake Frio Win 7 Home Premium x64 SP1 Retail AOC G2460PG (24" 1920 x 1080 144Hz G-SYNC) 
KeyboardPowerCaseMouse
Filco Majestouch 104-key Cherry MX Blues w/NKRO Corsair HX650 (Bronze, ordered on 12-12-2009) CM 690 Intellimouse Optical (1.1A) 1000Hz polling rate 
Mouse PadAudioAudio
Basic, but premium round X-Fi Titanium HD Klipsch ProMedia 2.1 (with 16 AWG Monster Cable... 
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It's a computer!
(19 items)
 
  
CPUMotherboardGraphicsRAM
i5-2500K @ 4.5GHz (1.368-1.384V fixed voltage) ASUS P8P67 EVO B3 (UEFI ver. 1850) GTX 780 ASUS DirectCU II (1228 / 6300, 1.180V) G.SKILL Ripjaws X 8GB (2 x 4GB) 1866MHz, CL9 
Hard DriveHard DriveHard DriveOptical Drive
250 GB Samsung 840 EVO (C:\) 250 GB Samsung 840 EVO (D:\) 150 GB WD VelociRaptor Samsung SH-S243N 24x DVD Burner 
Optical DriveCoolingOSMonitor
Samsung SH-S203N 20X DVD Burner Thermaltake Frio Win 7 Home Premium x64 SP1 Retail AOC G2460PG (24" 1920 x 1080 144Hz G-SYNC) 
KeyboardPowerCaseMouse
Filco Majestouch 104-key Cherry MX Blues w/NKRO Corsair HX650 (Bronze, ordered on 12-12-2009) CM 690 Intellimouse Optical (1.1A) 1000Hz polling rate 
Mouse PadAudioAudio
Basic, but premium round X-Fi Titanium HD Klipsch ProMedia 2.1 (with 16 AWG Monster Cable... 
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post #9 of 36
Thread Starter 
Thank you so much for the detailed post. I am confident to stick with the numbers I have right now then.

One more side question for you! I think that my motherboard (AsRock Z77 Pro4) is considered a "budget" board, not exactly one that hardcore gamers would buy to overclock with. I mean, my board doesn't even allow a basic manual VCore value.

So it seems like the budget boards don't have as high quality of power phases, VRMs, etc. I've been worrying about my CPU temps/voltages when overclocking, but I am wondering: should I also be concerned about possibly damaging my motherboard in the process of OCing as well? The fact that my board is considered "budget" makes me wonder if it might have inferior components that may burn out as a result of OCing.

Thanks again!thumb.gif
post #10 of 36

No, there are actually a lot of people on here who are loving their Z77 Pro4 and many are overclocking (or have overclocked) to as much as ~4.5 GHz and higher.

 

On an unrelated note - that is, to get back to what we were talking about earlier, I do recommend having some fun with experimentation to see what your CPU is capable of in this motherboard. Or you can even see how low you can get the voltage at 4.2 GHz. Sometimes, doing this can be far more fun than using the computer for things like gaming. lol

It's a computer!
(19 items)
 
  
CPUMotherboardGraphicsRAM
i5-2500K @ 4.5GHz (1.368-1.384V fixed voltage) ASUS P8P67 EVO B3 (UEFI ver. 1850) GTX 780 ASUS DirectCU II (1228 / 6300, 1.180V) G.SKILL Ripjaws X 8GB (2 x 4GB) 1866MHz, CL9 
Hard DriveHard DriveHard DriveOptical Drive
250 GB Samsung 840 EVO (C:\) 250 GB Samsung 840 EVO (D:\) 150 GB WD VelociRaptor Samsung SH-S243N 24x DVD Burner 
Optical DriveCoolingOSMonitor
Samsung SH-S203N 20X DVD Burner Thermaltake Frio Win 7 Home Premium x64 SP1 Retail AOC G2460PG (24" 1920 x 1080 144Hz G-SYNC) 
KeyboardPowerCaseMouse
Filco Majestouch 104-key Cherry MX Blues w/NKRO Corsair HX650 (Bronze, ordered on 12-12-2009) CM 690 Intellimouse Optical (1.1A) 1000Hz polling rate 
Mouse PadAudioAudio
Basic, but premium round X-Fi Titanium HD Klipsch ProMedia 2.1 (with 16 AWG Monster Cable... 
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It's a computer!
(19 items)
 
  
CPUMotherboardGraphicsRAM
i5-2500K @ 4.5GHz (1.368-1.384V fixed voltage) ASUS P8P67 EVO B3 (UEFI ver. 1850) GTX 780 ASUS DirectCU II (1228 / 6300, 1.180V) G.SKILL Ripjaws X 8GB (2 x 4GB) 1866MHz, CL9 
Hard DriveHard DriveHard DriveOptical Drive
250 GB Samsung 840 EVO (C:\) 250 GB Samsung 840 EVO (D:\) 150 GB WD VelociRaptor Samsung SH-S243N 24x DVD Burner 
Optical DriveCoolingOSMonitor
Samsung SH-S203N 20X DVD Burner Thermaltake Frio Win 7 Home Premium x64 SP1 Retail AOC G2460PG (24" 1920 x 1080 144Hz G-SYNC) 
KeyboardPowerCaseMouse
Filco Majestouch 104-key Cherry MX Blues w/NKRO Corsair HX650 (Bronze, ordered on 12-12-2009) CM 690 Intellimouse Optical (1.1A) 1000Hz polling rate 
Mouse PadAudioAudio
Basic, but premium round X-Fi Titanium HD Klipsch ProMedia 2.1 (with 16 AWG Monster Cable... 
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