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Good LGA2011 Cooler? - Page 2

post #11 of 20
Quote:
Originally Posted by ehume View Post

I have tested the Genesis. It's in my review of heatsinks. While it's a fine cooler, it was 2c behind the D15.

OP: make sure the heatsink you get has at least 6 heatpipes. Aside from AIO's, all of the major league coolers have 6 or more heatpipes. Also, look at the size of the fin stack. The larger the fin area, the greater the cooling capacity. And the 2011 chips have the potential of emitting the most heat.
Guess that mean Phanteks PH-TC14PE is not a 'major league cooler' in your mind? poke.gif It only has 5x pipes. biggrin.gif
I find it as good as any of the 6x or 8x pipe coolers. tongue.gif
post #12 of 20
Quote:
Originally Posted by doyll View Post
 
Quote:
Originally Posted by ehume View Post

I have tested the Genesis. It's in my review of heatsinks. While it's a fine cooler, it was 2c behind the D15.

OP: make sure the heatsink you get has at least 6 heatpipes. Aside from AIO's, all of the major league coolers have 6 or more heatpipes. Also, look at the size of the fin stack. The larger the fin area, the greater the cooling capacity. And the 2011 chips have the potential of emitting the most heat.
Guess that mean Phanteks PH-TC14PE is not a 'major league cooler' in your mind? poke.gif It only has 5x pipes. biggrin.gif
I find it as good as any of the 6x or 8x pipe coolers. tongue.gif


That depends. Are the heatpipes 8mm? As for "major league," that depends on whether it keeps my system at a net of 66c or below, or low enough that Real Temp does not log an error at 98c.

 

The OEM has not sent a Phanteks for review, so I can't comment on it. I wouldn't have thought the DeepCool Lucifer K2 would make it, but it did. Probably a Phanteks would, too. But until I can test one, it will go unrated.

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post #13 of 20
I was joking, when I first posted but your reply changes that.

You posted up sounding like it was a proven fact.
Quote:
Originally Posted by ehume View Post

...OP: make sure the heatsink you get has at least 6 heatpipes. Aside from AIO's, all of the major league coolers have 6 or more heatpipes. ...
And I pointed out you left out one of the best coolers available from your list.

Now you post making all kinds of excuses for not including the 5x pipe Phateks PH-TC14PE
Quote:
Originally Posted by ehume View Post


That depends. Are the heatpipes 8mm? As for "major league," that depends on whether it keeps my system at a net of 66c or below, or low enough that Real Temp does not log an error at 98c.

The OEM has not sent a Phanteks for review, so I can't comment on it. I wouldn't have thought the DeepCool Lucifer K2 would make it, but it did. Probably a Phanteks would, too. But until I can test one, it will go unrated.
There is no depends in your first statement

Your original post makes no mention of heatpipe size.

Keeping 'your system at at net 66c or below' is not a prerequisite of being one of the best coolers available. No idea what you are on about 98c errors, but also not relevant.

You should know that Phanteks PH-TC14PE is one of the best coolers on the market. The fact you have not personally tested it is not part of knowing this and therefor also relevant.

OEM does not need to send you a Phanteks for you to know it's cooling ability.

What the Lucifer K2 does or does not do is irrelevant.

No 'probably' involved. Phanteks PH-TC14PE is one of the best.
You do not need to test one. Many other reputable tester have and all agree it is.

Do you now consider your testing to be better and more credible than any of the rest of us?

Or is it that you cannot admit you made a mistake when you posted up saying 'make sure the heatsink you get has at least 6 heatpipes' and 'all of the major league coolers have 6 or more heatpipes' to be good?

Old Silver Arrow is still withing 3-5c of top coolers in today's market .. and it only has 4 pipes. thumbsdownsmileyanim.gif
post #14 of 20
getting abit off track here smile.gif

the OP wanted a good cooler for a LGA2011 which means there are RAM slots on both sides of the socket. it may be easier to just recommend a single tower like a true spirit 140 or something similar.

one thing the OP may want to consider is that a high performance HSF (such as an NH-D15) can be part of the "fail safe" design of the build. a fan failure on the server can trigger a shutdown, but if you have a strong enough cooler that can passively cool the chip at medium loads means you won't have down time even in the event of a fan failure. obviously he'd need to set up software to notify him of a fan failure, but he won't have to find that out because the server is down biggrin.gif
post #15 of 20
Quote:
Originally Posted by psyclum View Post

getting abit off track here smile.gif

the OP wanted a good cooler for a LGA2011 which means there are RAM slots on both sides of the socket. it may be easier to just recommend a single tower like a true spirit 140 or something similar.

one thing the OP may want to consider is that a high performance HSF (such as an NH-D15) can be part of the "fail safe" design of the build. a fan failure on the server can trigger a shutdown, but if you have a strong enough cooler that can passively cool the chip at medium loads means you won't have down time even in the event of a fan failure. obviously he'd need to set up software to notify him of a fan failure, but he won't have to find that out because the server is down biggrin.gif
A little. blushsmiley.gif But clarifying what top tier coolers are is relevant to topic.

We need to know how tall @MNiceGuy's RAM is if a large cooler is used.

There are many new coolers in the 212 cooling range, many cool bettr and cost less than 212.

Coolers similar to H110 are all much larger than 212.

Something like Thermalright Macho Rev. A or any of the 140mm fan models are quite good. The Le Grand Macho or Macho Zero are passsive / semi-passive.
Edited by doyll - 7/5/16 at 1:46am
post #16 of 20
Thread Starter 
Thanks again everyone for the insight on this.

This system will be using Ripjaws Z memory modules which come in at 40mm height.

Also worth noting, this system is running a very mild overclock of 3.9GHz across all cores (Turbo core sync). While overclocking is nice, I don't find it as necessary in this application as it is in a dedicated gaming rig. In this situation, I imagine those 12 logical cores are going to pay higher dividends.

Currently the H110 that is cooling things is more than adequately in my experience. One of the unit's fans starting having trouble so I unplugged it. While of course this did affect cooling performance I found that the CPU still remained within acceptable ranges.

I do understand that having a larger, more capable cooler could potentially allow the system to run passively but I see a couple drawbacks with that. Without leveraging the CPU fan failure shutdown feature, the system would either continue to run at elevated temperatures or would eventually shut down due to thermals. Neither seem very good for the hardware. While this system is meant to be high availability, it is not critical to any revenue-generating function so downtimes are acceptable.

In summary, I don't know that I really need something that's at the upper limit of cooling performance based on the fact I don't know that the CPU throws enough heat to warrant one, noise is of zero concern, and I don't wish to have a passive failover method.

Thoughts?
post #17 of 20
we are only throwing out ideas that may help you in your efforts. a well designed server build would include provisions for any "single" mechanical failure such as fan or PSU failure that's why I suggest a high performance cooler. a "single" fan failure should not take down a server regardless of where that fan may be located. whether it be an intake fan, CPU fan, or PSU fan, there should be some redundancy to ensure continual service of the server.

you can set the fan up as a push/pull on the CPU for redundancy purpose if you prefer staying with a cooler that is of the 212 evo caliber. however, considering a good heatsink really never depreciate much over time, investing in a good cooler is always a good bet when it comes to allocating funds for a build. i mean, how many top end rigs on OCN are still built around the tried and true NH-D14 that is almost 7 years old? a high performance air heatsink like the NH-D14 is only limited by the available mounting kit for new sockets (which noctua will happily provide as stated on their web site.). it wouldn't surprise me at all if someone is still using an NH-D14 10 years from now (assuming something crazy doesn't happen in the "post silicon age" after intel's 7nm chips) we don't know what cooling will be like after the migration to graphene/diamond chips running at 10Ghz+ so predicting pass the next 10 years would be silly, but it's pretty safe bet that any high end cooler you get today will be good for at least 10 years down the road.
post #18 of 20
Thread Starter 
Quote:
Originally Posted by psyclum View Post

we are only throwing out ideas that may help you in your efforts. a well designed server build would include provisions for any "single" mechanical failure such as fan or PSU failure that's why I suggest a high performance cooler. a "single" fan failure should not take down a server regardless of where that fan may be located. whether it be an intake fan, CPU fan, or PSU fan, there should be some redundancy to ensure continual service of the server.

you can set the fan up as a push/pull on the CPU for redundancy purpose if you prefer staying with a cooler that is of the 212 evo caliber. however, considering a good heatsink really never depreciate much over time, investing in a good cooler is always a good bet when it comes to allocating funds for a build. i mean, how many top end rigs on OCN are still built around the tried and true NH-D14 that is almost 7 years old? a high performance air heatsink like the NH-D14 is only limited by the available mounting kit for new sockets (which noctua will happily provide as stated on their web site.). it wouldn't surprise me at all if someone is still using an NH-D14 10 years from now (assuming something crazy doesn't happen in the "post silicon age" after intel's 7nm chips) we don't know what cooling will be like after the migration to graphene/diamond chips running at 10Ghz+ so predicting pass the next 10 years would be silly, but it's pretty safe bet that any high end cooler you get today will be good for at least 10 years down the road.

I completely understand and greatly appreciate the discussion so far. If my response above seemed inflammatory in any way I do apologize as it wasn't intentional.

I think your approach is absolutely right on when the topic is a server. Most small business class servers and higher have features to maximize uptime and error-free operation (redundant PSU, ECC memory, UPS, etc.).

For me, if the server goes down then it's down until I figure out what happened to it. The current iteration of this box is basically a glorified redundant data server with some media usage sprinkled in. With X79 I'm looking to tinker with VMs and expand the media serving functions. In other words, if the device is no longer available, personal files won't be accessible and some folks are going to have to find something else to watch or listen to. In the event of a catastrophic failure, the entire data structure is accessible on backup devices. Very minimal impact.

I agree that spending more on a cooler, so long as the manufacturer is known for keeping up with sockets, makes more sense than spending a little extra on something like a graphics card. I remember when the NH-D14 came out. That was back when I was thin, young, and vibrant wink.gif I was surprised to see it as a recommendation in this thread on the basis that it was even still viable.
post #19 of 20
NH-D!4 is not only viable, but considered one of the top cooler recommendations at the 160mm height limit even with today's market choices smile.gif alot of the smaller cases that has a HSF height limit of 160mm still benefit strongly by NH-D14's performance since nothing at that height significantly out perform the tried and true D14. the D14 still compete well with larger coolers in the 165mm or even the 170mm height range in terms of performance per decibel cost since the D14 was never a loud cooler in the 1st place.

you will eventually need to replace the fan as it wears out over a decade of service, but as far as the heatsink itself, a regular annual cleaning to remove excess dust and it's good for another year of worry free service. no significant technological breakthrough in cooling has been introduced since the D14 that would make it obsolete so yes a great cooler 7 years ago is still a great cooler today smile.gif the only thing that has changed in the market since the introduction of the D14 has been height, and the proliferation of 140mm fans. newer/taller coolers do cool better, but only at a cost of needing a wider case or more decibel cost from the fans.
post #20 of 20
Quote:
Originally Posted by MNiceGuy View Post

Thanks again everyone for the insight on this.

This system will be using Ripjaws Z memory modules which come in at 40mm height.

Also worth noting, this system is running a very mild overclock of 3.9GHz across all cores (Turbo core sync). While overclocking is nice, I don't find it as necessary in this application as it is in a dedicated gaming rig. In this situation, I imagine those 12 logical cores are going to pay higher dividends.

Currently the H110 that is cooling things is more than adequately in my experience. One of the unit's fans starting having trouble so I unplugged it. While of course this did affect cooling performance I found that the CPU still remained within acceptable ranges.

I do understand that having a larger, more capable cooler could potentially allow the system to run passively but I see a couple drawbacks with that. Without leveraging the CPU fan failure shutdown feature, the system would either continue to run at elevated temperatures or would eventually shut down due to thermals. Neither seem very good for the hardware. While this system is meant to be high availability, it is not critical to any revenue-generating function so downtimes are acceptable.

In summary, I don't know that I really need something that's at the upper limit of cooling performance based on the fact I don't know that the CPU throws enough heat to warrant one, noise is of zero concern, and I don't wish to have a passive failover method.

Thoughts?

Quote:
Originally Posted by MNiceGuy View Post

I completely understand and greatly appreciate the discussion so far. If my response above seemed inflammatory in any way I do apologize as it wasn't intentional.

I think your approach is absolutely right on when the topic is a server. Most small business class servers and higher have features to maximize uptime and error-free operation (redundant PSU, ECC memory, UPS, etc.).

For me, if the server goes down then it's down until I figure out what happened to it. The current iteration of this box is basically a glorified redundant data server with some media usage sprinkled in. With X79 I'm looking to tinker with VMs and expand the media serving functions. In other words, if the device is no longer available, personal files won't be accessible and some folks are going to have to find something else to watch or listen to. In the event of a catastrophic failure, the entire data structure is accessible on backup devices. Very minimal impact.

I agree that spending more on a cooler, so long as the manufacturer is known for keeping up with sockets, makes more sense than spending a little extra on something like a graphics card. I remember when the NH-D14 came out. That was back when I was thin, young, and vibrant wink.gif I was surprised to see it as a recommendation in this thread on the basis that it was even still viable.

psyclum has summed it up quite well. thumb.gif

A good cooler is like a good case. It can be used for many many years.

The Define R5 is a great case, but the stock fans in front are sadly lacking in performance. Replacing them with something better and higher speed rating and using motherboard temp/speed control means if a fan does fail and heat starts to rise the speed of other fans is increased. End result is system stays cool and we hear more noise from case .. meaning it's time to investigate why. wink.gif "Ways to Better Cooling" thread linked in my sig might be of interest. 1st post is index, click on topic of interest to see it. 5th is a good basic guide to case airflow, 4th is PWM control of case fans, 48th is Define R2 -R5 case mods.

As for fan redundancy, using a 2x fan cooler or a semi-passive cooler like the Thermalright 140mm fan Macho coolers gives you a fan on cooler that sets very close to rear exhaust .. meaning case airflow 'semi-passively' moving through the cooler keeps things cool. I have used Thermalright HR-22, Le Grand Macho, Macho rev.A & B, Macho Direct, etc. All work very well. Le Grand Macho is one of the best passive / semi-passive, but Macho rev.A & B are close. While HR-22 is biggest with most heatpipes, the Le Grand Macho seems to slightly outperform it. Macho Direct is lower price but does an amazing job. I only mention these because they are offset back and end up flowing air even without cooler fan/s.

CPU cooler mount patterns (knock on wood) seem to be rather constant for many years now. But most good cooler companies have traditionally supplied mounts when cooler mounting changes were needed. Some do it free while some sell them. Either way it's not expensive.

Honestly, 2x front and 1x bottom intakes with case raised so bottom vents get better airflow and no exhaust fans needed. Remove the bottom and back grills and not only does airflow increase, but noise levels go even lower. With the bottom filter sliding out the front and front filter accessed by opening the front door of Define R5, it is super easy to keep them cleaned and in a smoke free house there is almost no dirt buildup inside of case.

As for what fans to use, there are many. Thermalright TY-147A is coming out in a square version soon, new F D Venturi look to be good, Phanteks PH-F140XP, PH-F140SP and PH-F140MP are good, Noctua are good but more expensive in most places, .. and that's only a few of what I consider very good.

Edit: Define R5 has 180mm CPU clearance. This is 188mm surface of motherboard to side cover. 40mm Ripjaw RAM plus 3mm RAM socket is 43mm leaving 143mm for fan between top of RAM and case. (29th post in 'Ways to Better Cooling') wink.gif
Edited by doyll - 7/6/16 at 4:18am
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