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GPU Question - Open Air vs Blower Fan in my Case? - Page 3

post #21 of 39
Thread Starter 
Quote:
Originally Posted by maddangerous View Post

In that picture, the smaller PSU is not blocking the holes in the back of the case, whereas in your first picture the larger PSU would be.

Those holes are not in the case. Those holes are in the Corsair SFX to ATX adapter which has to be purchased separately. I would be purchasing it though, as it is much nicer than the adapter that comes with the Silverstone SX500-LG I would be buying. I actually used this very PSU in my previous build that I sold. The ATX adapter that comes with the Silverstone SFX-L PSU does not have the extra venting holes like on the Corsair. It also centers the SFX-L PSU into the ATX opening. This would be counterproductive in my situation. The Corsair adapter doesn't center the SFX PSU into an ATX opening, it actually has it so the bottom of the SFX PSU will sit where the ATX would and then adds the venting where the extra height of an actual ATX would be.

The Silverstone SX500-LG SFX-L PSU is actually a pretty nice PSU in my opinion. I never had a single issue with it. The 120mm fan is dead quiet when it is actually spinning, which isn't all of the time because it operates semi-fanless. I experienced zero coil whine / electric noise as well. Johnny Guru gave it a 9/10 and stated that it came out of the "Sirfa" factory. Not sure what that means. It is not the 10/10 that they gave my current PSU, but obviously I am not basing my PSU purchases solely on Johnny Guru.

Included SFX to ATX Adapter



Corsair SFX to ATX Adapter


* For those that do not know, SFX and SFX-L are identical in width, height, and mounting hole pattern. The only difference is SFX-L having added length, just like the name implies.
post #22 of 39
How is this a three page thread? tongue.gif

Waaaaaaaaayyyyyyyyyy overthinking this. Yes, the reference cooler would have clearer air path, but an AIB will have a much better cooler on it and be far quieter. You are seriously probably talking about a couple of degree difference at most by changing out the PSU.
post #23 of 39
Thread Starter 
I understand that. I just really don't like how close the ATX PSU would actually be to an open air cooler. Switching to an SFX-L PSU would solve this problem and provide "some" better air flow. The Corsair SFX to ATX adapter would also add "some" extra venting. I would also benefit from the SFX-L PSU with future case options, as more and more iTX cases are requiring SFX(L) PSUs. I actually thought about this initially and should have acted upon it.

I am definitely overthinking this. HaHa. However, it is not everyday that I am going to build a PC. Right now I am easily in my return window with my current ATX PSU. It would be nothing to order the SFX-L and return my ATX upon receiving it.

Is it worth the trouble? Probably not. I am perfectly content with my current PSU and actually feel it is top notch when you consider I only paid $75 for it. That is why I am trying to make up my mind on what GPU I actually want. If I end up purchasing a blower fan card than it would have all been for "essentially" nothing.

I personally feel that I have two options:

1: Purchase a blower GPU and leave my system as is. I know blower cards aren't quite as "good" as open air and are louder but would provide added exhaust and less overall heat in my system.

2: Purchase an open air GPU and swap my ATX PSU with the SFX-L PSU.

I lean more and more to a blower fan card. I'm not sure that I want to sacrifice $25 to get a PSU that in my opinion is not as "good". (SFX-L is $100 vs $75) I also think a blower fan card would better suit my build in terms of thermals and exhaust of my entire system overall anyways. However, right now my system is dead a$$ quiet. How bad do I want it to stay that way?
Edited by Techbyte - 7/4/16 at 9:31am
post #24 of 39
While I understand where ciarlatano is coming from, I also understand this so-called 'over-thinking' he is teasing us with. I would much rather spend a few extra days 'over-thinking' something than make decisions too quickly and overlook something. thumb.gif
post #25 of 39
Quote:
Originally Posted by doyll View Post

While I understand where ciarlatano is coming from, I also understand this so-called 'over-thinking' he is teasing us with. I would much rather spend a few extra days 'over-thinking' something than make decisions too quickly and overlook something. thumb.gif

I agree, but in this case you are really talking about something incredibly trivial.

BTW - going with the blower pigeonholes you into a reference board, while there are better designs from AIB. So, you get a card that isn't as good that makes more noise. Not a whole lot to think about here. wink.gif
post #26 of 39
Thread Starter 
Quote:
Originally Posted by doyll View Post

While I understand where ciarlatano is coming from, I also understand this so-called 'over-thinking' he is teasing us with. I would much rather spend a few extra days 'over-thinking' something than make decisions too quickly and overlook something. thumb.gif

I agree, which is exactly why I am posting here. I was just looking for input from others is all. If I am going to do the PSU swap I need to get it ordered as my return window on my current PSU is slowly closing.
post #27 of 39
Thread Starter 
Quote:
Originally Posted by ciarlatano View Post

I agree, but in this case you are really talking about something incredibly trivial.

BTW - going with the blower pigeonholes you into a reference board, while there are better designs from AIB. So, you get a card that isn't as good that makes more noise. Not a whole lot to think about here. wink.gif

I also agree with you as well, it is pretty trivial. I am just being OCD as always. HaHa. Obviously many others have paired open air GPUs in the Define Nano S while using an ATX PSU and aren't having any real issues. I just seen an opportunity to possibly better my system and GPU airflow and thought I would seek some input.

As far as reference board, the 1070 I would be shooting for would be the Msi 1070 Aero. It definitely seems "reference" like but according to Msi :

"One of the deciding factors in performance is the quality of the components used. That is why MSI only uses MIL-STD-810G certified components for AERO cards. These components have proven durable enough to withstand the torturous circumstances of extreme gaming and overclocking for extended usage."

Do you think they took the reference board and just swapped the power delivery components for their "better" ones? Or is it a custom board. I have been searching but can't find any real info or reviews on the 1070 Aero.
post #28 of 39
IMO PSU is not that huge of a problem. yes it does block some airflow, but if you have ever seen a SLi/Xfire build on a mATX rig, you'll know what i mean biggrin.gif as long as you have good airflow in the case, it will handle it even with internal exhaust coolers.

what it all comes down to is not necessarily temp but db. the noise level is the only thing that will change since both cooler types will get the job done. the temp you run it at depends on your fan curve in afterburner the resulting noise level will be the difference between how efficient the cooling is. personally I feel the larger heatsink would win out here, but that's just an opinion since i don't have solid proof behind how it will work out in that case. if configured properly, he will have 2x140mm +120mm intake and no exhaust fan. exhaust will simply be leakage from the rear and roof exhaust holes. the reason why i recommend 3x intake instead of 2x intake and 1 exhaust is because that case is pretty "leaky". it has roof fan mounts which means there are plenty of roof exhaust leakage area as well as the rear. there isn't much reason to force the hot air out when it will naturally leak out at the area you want it to leave the case in the 1st place.

given sufficient leakage area in a case, the only reason to put exhaust fan is if you want the exhaust to be channeled to a certain area of the case. but in his build, it's not necessary since it will leak out from rear/roof anyway. pumping more cold air into a case this small is likely going to benefit more then trying to draw hot air out of the case. remember, the total volume of this case is 26.8 liter which comes out to less then 1 cubic foot (0.95 cubic foot) and that's the volume including the area behind the mobo tray which really isn't part of this discussion. he can easily replace the air inside the case once per second (only takes 60 actual CFM to accomplish this) without costing him too many decibels. with this MASSIVE amount of airflow, it really doesn't matter if part of his GPU cooler intake is blocked by the PSU, it will still get the job done. (unless he decide to go with a R9 nano or something that small later which will be blocked much more then a regular GPU cooler)

like ciarlatano said, we are more or less splitting hairs at this point since the difference isn't even the temp but the decibel we are trying to optimize.
post #29 of 39
I've done crossfire rigs with both the blower and circulating coolers and both types have to run the shrouded card's fan(s) much harder to keep the same temperatures.

Stirring coolers are a joke as far as actually directing the hot air in any sort of a logical way. The only reason they "work" is because the heatsink and fans are way overkill and people put an obnoxious amount of case fans on a case that's like mesh material. Seems like a waste to me but I'm an engineer not some apartment complex benchmarker.

There's a lot of ways to pull off keeping a card cool. Some are just more logical than others. What it really comes down to is opinion. The manufacturers make these cards so any idiot can slap them together so pretty much anything will "work".
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Hard DriveHard DriveOptical DriveCooling
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post #30 of 39
as i said before, IMO it's of little difference when choosing between the 2 types in this situation. he has enough airflow in the case that either type of cooler can be used w/o significant impact to performance. the reference cooler (blower style) works because its intake is not blocked by the PSU and it has a MUCH stronger fan. however due to the design, it has significantly smaller heatsink making it less efficient at removing the heat from the GPU hence the need for a higher static pressure fan to push pass the high fin density heatsink.

the internal exhaust (aftermarket) design cooler has significantly larger heatsink while sporting weaker fans. a good amount of the fan intake will be blocked by the PSU so the fan will have to work harder to pull the air through the small gap between the PSU and the cooler. compounding the problem is you have recirculation of heat due to the internal exhaust design of the heatsink itself. however this problem is largely mitigated by the massive amount of airflow inherent to the case design and total internal volume of the case.

blower style coolers are loud but gets the job done. aftermarket style cooler have to work harder due to the blockage from the PSU. so either style will cost higher then normal decibel levels. but that's all it is. it's not like one style will offer a significant performance advantage to overclocking since both will perform similarly under these conditions. it's a matter of which one does it louder.
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