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Case Labs Lead Times - Whoa - Page 2

post #11 of 27
In fairness, I'll post that my accessory orders shipped today. Woot!
post #12 of 27
Quote:
Originally Posted by WorldExclusive View Post


Without trying to know too much, is there a benefit financially to doing paid up front, made to order cases?
I think it's time to go with packaged upgrades in 2-3 stages instead of item upgrades.

Make a vanilla case with a 2-3 stage package upgrade kit. All made in bulk.

From a business stand point, there's a HUGE advantage in having the payment up front. You're floating material and labor costs and carrying inventory otherwise. Every business would do this if they could.

If you think about it, many of the parts to their cases are universal. That would mean they likely already make them in bulk. All of the accessory and replacement parts have much smaller wait times.
I imagine only the unique large pieces and the individual boxing take the time (and the whole waiting for a group of orders to make a particular color).

If you're taking more orders than you can produce, it doesn't really matter if you try to batch them or not, unless for some reason batching them gains you more capacity. I'm guessing they already have their retooling times mapped out well enough to know when they can efficiently move from one part to the next to maximize output.
post #13 of 27
Quote:
Originally Posted by Groo21 View Post

From a business stand point, there's a HUGE advantage in having the payment up front. You're floating material and labor costs and carrying inventory otherwise. Every business would do this if they could.

If you think about it, many of the parts to their cases are universal. That would mean they likely already make them in bulk. All of the accessory and replacement parts have much smaller wait times.
I imagine only the unique large pieces and the individual boxing take the time (and the whole waiting for a group of orders to make a particular color).

If you're taking more orders than you can produce, it doesn't really matter if you try to batch them or not, unless for some reason batching them gains you more capacity. I'm guessing they already have their retooling times mapped out well enough to know when they can efficiently move from one part to the next to maximize output.

As a customer, I rather buy what's in stock and receive it in 3-5 days, than to wait a weeks for a paid item. CL can look at their monthly numbers an estimate how many cases they need to stock to fulfill orders. If they sell 200 S8 cases per month, they can have 150 cases ready to go at the start of each month, with pre-packaged upgrades so they don't have to customize anything. The other 50 can be easily made later in the month if necessary. If they sell out before the end of the month, they remain sold out until the start of the next month. Production issues come into play when you never place a firm stop. If CL can only produce 100 S8 cases per month and they have orders for 200, they didn't adhere to a firm stop. Sold out should have been placed on the website once they reach 100. Companies practice this method to keep customer service quality high, not their revenues.

When it's all about generating a constant stream of revenue, a company is certain to lose focus on customer service.
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post #14 of 27
Quote:
Originally Posted by WorldExclusive View Post

As a customer, I rather buy what's in stock and receive it in 3-5 days, than to wait a weeks for a paid item. CL can look at their monthly numbers an estimate how many cases they need to stock to fulfill orders. If they sell 200 S8 cases per month, they can have 150 cases ready to go at the start of each month, with pre-packaged upgrades so they don't have to customize anything. The other 50 can be easily made later in the month if necessary. If they sell out before the end of the month, they remain sold out until the start of the next month. Production issues come into play when you never place a firm stop. If CL can only produce 100 S8 cases per month and they have orders for 200, they didn't adhere to a firm stop. Sold out should have been placed on the website once they reach 100. Companies practice this method to keep customer service quality high, not their revenues.

When it's all about generating a constant stream of revenue, a company is certain to lose focus on customer service.

Let you know how naive I was, my first CaseLabs case a Magnum M8 back in 2013, I assumed a paid custom order arrived to CaseLabs Fulfillment Dept., they pulled the panels and parts from a shelf, wrapped them in plastic, boxed them up in say 30minutes and stacked the days orders up to ship out the next morning.

Boy, was I ever wrong. rolleyes.gif
     
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post #15 of 27
Quote:
Originally Posted by WorldExclusive View Post

As a customer, I rather buy what's in stock and receive it in 3-5 days, than to wait a weeks for a paid item. CL can estimate how many cases they need to stock to fulfill orders. If they sell out before the end of the month, they remain sold out until the start of the next month. Production issues come into play when you never place a firm stop. Sold out should have been placed on the website once they reach 100. Companies practice this method to keep customer service quality high, not their revenues.


From a customer point of view, I agree. Everyone wants their order sooner rather than later.

In this case, given that they're already 8 weeks to ship, it already means they are producing material as fast as they humanly can. So it's not possible to get to the quick-ship state until they get caught up. It's possible they rarely ever get below their capacity to build up inventory. Only CL knows that for sure.

I would almost guarantee they aren't doing line switches for each individual order at this point. This is a great Industrial Engineering problem if any of the younger crowd in this thread are wondering what to major in in college.

One of the hardest things for a small business to do is expand. Going from smaller production to larger production without losing quality is HARD. Particularly when quality is one of your key selling points. There is the whole IP issue with going the common route of overseas production. The next thing you know 10 companies are selling unbranded knockoffs of all of your products from the same factory (or the one next door) from where you source.
Edited by Groo21 - 7/9/16 at 10:17am
post #16 of 27
Quote:
Originally Posted by Groo21 View Post

From a customer point of view, I agree. Everyone wants their order sooner rather than later.

In this case, given that they're already 8 weeks to ship, it already means they are producing material as fast as they humanly can. So it's not possible to get to the quick-ship state until they get caught up. It's possible they rarely ever get below their capacity to build up inventory. Only CL knows that for sure.

I would almost guarantee they aren't doing line switches for each individual order at this point. This is a great Industrial Engineering problem if any of the younger crowd in this thread are wondering what to major in in college.

One of the hardest things for a small business to do is expand. Going from smaller production to larger production without losing quality is HARD. Particularly when quality is one of your key selling points. There is the whole IP issue with going the common route of overseas production. The next thing you know 10 companies are selling unbranded knockoffs of all of your products from the same factory (or the one next door) from where you source.

Thermalfake is already trying.
post #17 of 27
Yes. I strongly considered it before I ordered from Case Labs.

It should probably be a wake up call to case labs to review their current designs, see what Thermaltake thought needed improvement, and consider some updates.

Case Labs will never lose out on build quality.

Though they might lose out in features or air flow.

There are some mind boggling air flow decisions made on the S8 that the Core 9 addresses.
post #18 of 27
Quote:
Originally Posted by Groo21 View Post

From a customer point of view, I agree. Everyone wants their order sooner rather than later.

In this case, given that they're already 8 weeks to ship, it already means they are producing material as fast as they humanly can. So it's not possible to get to the quick-ship state until they get caught up. It's possible they rarely ever get below their capacity to build up inventory. Only CL knows that for sure.

It's could be possible they are now reliant on pre-orders to maintain monthly revenue because of not using production stops. Stops produce less money, but it never exceeds capacity. If this is not the case, new orders should be suspended until they reach 50% capacity and lower. I'm a web designer, and I had to suspend taking on new designs until the current work was finished. Lost out on new business but my income remained the same. I didn't increase my income but I did increase my customer service. Some of those deals did come back weeks later.

Quote:
Originally Posted by Groo21 View Post


One of the hardest things for a small business to do is expand. Going from smaller production to larger production without losing quality is HARD. Particularly when quality is one of your key selling points.

I'm going through that now. Going from a one man swiss army knife to three trainees. It takes time for me to train them, but I can already feel the efficiency of my company increasing. I primarily expanded to deliver projects on time. By paying three new people I make less money in the short term, but with reduced workload I can increase how many projects I can take on. I'm sure that what's being said here wasn't already considered. CL makes tons more money and has more experience in business than me. But at times we don't believe a simple answer can be a solution to a complicated problem. Simple answers are usually the more painful approach to solving the problem. We like to entertain complicated answers to find ways to lessen the pain, but in the end you will need to face it and overcome it.
Edited by WorldExclusive - 7/10/16 at 6:19am
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post #19 of 27
Quote:
Originally Posted by Case Labs View Post

I understand the concern, but no, this is nothing like what happened with Frozen. Manufacturing output has increased 30% since the first of the year. That may not sound like much for those of you outside of manufacturing, but for those who are, you know that's a big deal. Sales are simply rising faster.

I know we get a lot of suggestions on how to "fix" it (more space, more people, more equipment) and if it was that simple, believe me, I would be all over it, but as you might guess, it's not. It's still a daily topic of discussion internally though as I am not at all satisfied with our current situation.
How about, *cough*, stop taking orders when fulling them takes longer than 14 days? 2 months wait? That's unreal. On the other hand if people willingly and knowingly order a case when the 2 month wait is told them before they confirm the order, it's up to them to decide whether they want to or not onto that long waiting list.
post #20 of 27
I absolutely love Cade Labs and enjoyed the s8 build I did. But there lead times and delivery times just doesn't allow me to buy cases from them on a regular basis. If I know months ahead of a build its ok, most of my builds are last minute and people want them now. Unless they can deliver in a timely manner I can't generally buy from them. frown.gif
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