Overclock.net › Forums › Overclockers Care › Overclock.net Folding@Home Team › Join Overclock.net's Folding@Home Team
New Posts  All Forums:Forum Nav:

Join Overclock.net's Folding@Home Team - Page 2

post #11 of 1061
Can someone tell me what this is in laman terms?
My System
(13 items)
 
  
CPUMotherboardPower
Pentium 4, 2.4A @ 3.02 MSI 865 Neo 350W Generic 
  hide details  
Reply
My System
(13 items)
 
  
CPUMotherboardPower
Pentium 4, 2.4A @ 3.02 MSI 865 Neo 350W Generic 
  hide details  
Reply
post #12 of 1061
Thread Starter 
You are contributing to the betterment of mankind by donating your idle cpu processes to science. Nobody makes a cent off of it, nothing bad happens to your PC (not even a noticeable performance hit). All good, no bad.
post #13 of 1061
k ERRM GIVE ME A SEC
My System
(13 items)
 
  
CPUMotherboardOSMonitor
Amd Athlon 64 3200 ASUS KnV8 Windows Xp pro Hp Pavillion fx50 
PowerCaseMouse
Jeantech 600W Akasa Clear UV reactive Microsoft Multimedia 
  hide details  
Reply
My System
(13 items)
 
  
CPUMotherboardOSMonitor
Amd Athlon 64 3200 ASUS KnV8 Windows Xp pro Hp Pavillion fx50 
PowerCaseMouse
Jeantech 600W Akasa Clear UV reactive Microsoft Multimedia 
  hide details  
Reply
post #14 of 1061
ARTICLE PROVIDED BY http://folding.stanford.edu/science.html
(THIS AVOIDS PLAGERISM)
WHAT ARE PROTEINS?

Proteins are necklaces of amino acids --- long chain molecules. Proteins are the basis of how biology gets things done. As enzymes, they are the driving force behind all of the biochemical reactions which make biology work. As structural elements, they are the main constituent of our bones, muscles, hair, skin and blood vessels. As antibodies, they recognize invading elements and allow the immune system to get rid of the unwanted invaders. For these reasons, scientists have sequenced the human genome -- the blueprint for all of the proteins in biology -- but how can we understand what these proteins do and how they work?



RELATIONSHIP TO THE HUMAN GENOME PROJECT

Since proteins play such fundamental roles in biology, scientists have sequenced the human genome. The genome is in a sense a "blueprint" for these proteins -- the genome contains the DNA code which specifies the sequence of the amino acids beads along the protein "necklace."



WHY DO PROTEINS "FOLD"?

However, only knowing this sequence tells us little about what the protein does and how it does it. In order to carry out their function (eg as enzymes or antibodies), they must take on a particular shape, also known as a "fold." Thus, proteins are truly amazing machines: before they do their work, they assemble themselves! This self-assembly is called "folding."

One of our project goals is to simulate protein folding in order to understand how proteins fold so quickly and reliably, and to learn how to make synthetic polymers with these properties. Movies of the results of some of these simulation results can be found here.



PROTEIN FOLDING AND DISEASE: BSE (Mad Cow), Altzheimer's, ...

What happens if proteins don't fold correctly? Diseases such as Alzheimer's disease, cystic fibrosis, BSE (Mad Cow disease), an inherited form of emphysema, and even many cancers are believed to result from protein misfolding.

When proteins misfold, they can clump together ("aggregate"). These clumps can often gather in the brain, where they are believed to cause the symptoms of Mad Cow or Alzheimer's disease.



PROTEIN FOLDING AND NANOTECHNOLOGY: Building man made machines on the nanoscale

In addition to biomedical applications, learning about how proteins fold will also teach us how to design our own protein-sized "nanomachines" to do similar tasks. Of course, before nanomachines can carry out any activity, they must also be assembled.



WHY IS PROTEIN FOLDING SO DIFFICULT TO UNDERSTAND?

It's amazing that not only do proteins self-assemble -- fold -- but they do so amazingly quickly: some as fast as a millionth of a second. While this time is very fast on a person's timescale, it's remarkably long for computers to simulate.

In fact, it takes about a day to simulate a nanosecond (1/1,000,000,000 of a second). Unfortunately, proteins fold on the tens of microsecond timescale (10,000 nanoseconds). Thus, it would take 10,000 CPU days to simulate folding -- i.e. it would take 30 CPU years! That's a long time to wait for one result!



A SOLUTION: DISTRIBUTED DYNAMICS



To solve the protein folding problem, we need to break the microsecond barrier. Our group has developed a new way to simulate protein folding which can break the microsecond barrier by dividing the work between multiple processors in a new way -- with a near linear speed up in the number of processors. Thus, with 1000 processors, we can break the microsecond barrier and help unlock the mystery of how proteins fold.
My System
(13 items)
 
  
CPUMotherboardOSMonitor
Amd Athlon 64 3200 ASUS KnV8 Windows Xp pro Hp Pavillion fx50 
PowerCaseMouse
Jeantech 600W Akasa Clear UV reactive Microsoft Multimedia 
  hide details  
Reply
My System
(13 items)
 
  
CPUMotherboardOSMonitor
Amd Athlon 64 3200 ASUS KnV8 Windows Xp pro Hp Pavillion fx50 
PowerCaseMouse
Jeantech 600W Akasa Clear UV reactive Microsoft Multimedia 
  hide details  
Reply
post #15 of 1061
Hey guys I installed it but for team number it says 0 and I don't know how to change it so that it's on our team. Plz help!
post #16 of 1061
figured it out! go to config.
my bad
post #17 of 1061
Oh, I was wondering how a program was folding proteins

OK this makes much more sense, shall do.
My System
(13 items)
 
  
CPUMotherboardPower
Pentium 4, 2.4A @ 3.02 MSI 865 Neo 350W Generic 
  hide details  
Reply
My System
(13 items)
 
  
CPUMotherboardPower
Pentium 4, 2.4A @ 3.02 MSI 865 Neo 350W Generic 
  hide details  
Reply
post #18 of 1061
Does this add anything to my HD?

Just wondering because while it's running it says "56843789" bytes downloaded... (that was a fake number)
My System
(13 items)
 
  
CPUMotherboardPower
Pentium 4, 2.4A @ 3.02 MSI 865 Neo 350W Generic 
  hide details  
Reply
My System
(13 items)
 
  
CPUMotherboardPower
Pentium 4, 2.4A @ 3.02 MSI 865 Neo 350W Generic 
  hide details  
Reply
post #19 of 1061
It uses temporary files...and when it says bytes, remember how many bytes are in a megabyte. :-P
Raven
(15 items)
 
  
CPUMotherboardGraphicsRAM
i7 950 EVGA FTW3 XFX Double Dissipation R9-290X-EDFD Radeon R9 290X 6x2GB Geil Black Dragon 
Hard DriveOptical DriveCoolingOS
Corsair Force F120 HD/BD Combo CORSAIR Hydro H70 CWCH70 120mm High Performance... Win7 Pro x64 
MonitorKeyboardPowerCase
Hanns G 27.5 Logitech G somethin Zalman 850 Silverstone Raven 
MouseAudio
Steel Series Diablo III Razer Barracuda AC-1 
  hide details  
Reply
Raven
(15 items)
 
  
CPUMotherboardGraphicsRAM
i7 950 EVGA FTW3 XFX Double Dissipation R9-290X-EDFD Radeon R9 290X 6x2GB Geil Black Dragon 
Hard DriveOptical DriveCoolingOS
Corsair Force F120 HD/BD Combo CORSAIR Hydro H70 CWCH70 120mm High Performance... Win7 Pro x64 
MonitorKeyboardPowerCase
Hanns G 27.5 Logitech G somethin Zalman 850 Silverstone Raven 
MouseAudio
Steel Series Diablo III Razer Barracuda AC-1 
  hide details  
Reply
post #20 of 1061
I'm picky about my drive :-D

How long does it take for me to show up in the team stats? I've got 2/400 done lol 1%!!
My System
(13 items)
 
  
CPUMotherboardPower
Pentium 4, 2.4A @ 3.02 MSI 865 Neo 350W Generic 
  hide details  
Reply
My System
(13 items)
 
  
CPUMotherboardPower
Pentium 4, 2.4A @ 3.02 MSI 865 Neo 350W Generic 
  hide details  
Reply
New Posts  All Forums:Forum Nav:
  Return Home
  Back to Forum: Overclock.net Folding@Home Team
Overclock.net › Forums › Overclockers Care › Overclock.net Folding@Home Team › Join Overclock.net's Folding@Home Team