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Help with homemade water cooler

post #1 of 4
Thread Starter 
Here is some photos from my current progress on this water cooler:
Warning: Spoiler! (Click to show)





I started with this copper plate, that I removed from a old GPU heat sink, it was kinda glued/soldered to the aluminium on the heat sink, it was from a 550Ti... After cleaning this plate, I cutted this pieces of copper into form, and melt some tin with soldering iron only in the side that I planned to solder to the copper heat spreader. Then I made a rudimentary wooden frame, to support the copper pieces into position. You can see the wooden sticks in one of the photos. After all preparations with the frame, I cutted pieces of tin soldering wire, and filled the spaces between the copper pieces with the tin, that have a nice flux core, 1.5mm solder. Next, I placed the copper plate on a burner (home stove) at low heat, and slowly finding the right amount of heat, I was testing the heat with a wire of solder on my hand, poking it on the copper surface. Once it was hot enough, I melted a little of this tin wire all over the area that I was planning to place the copper fins on the frame, and seconds later I placed it very carefully, and watch the flux and tin doing his things, going to place. I turned down the burner on the next second, and left it cooling down naturally. The result was that you can see on the photos.

Now, I need to make the walls of the block, but I'm not sure how make it. I don't think that I can use the soldering iron on it to solder pieces of copper because the copper itself would absorb all the heat. I can't bring the copper back to the stove, because it would melt all the my work that I did on the copper fins. Not sure if is possible to make another solder there, maybe you guys have some ideias. I don't have many resources to use here, but I have some copper (very thick flat pieces), I have new pcb's single layer copper, have some aluminum, some acrylic, but no glue to acrylic (I have acetone maybe it can glue acrylic, I don't know), and I have some other things, epoxy glue, glue for motor block seals, pvc, etc..

A idea that I was having would be use a pocket hand burner (butane torch) but I think that the one that I have has gone to the limb.. Maybe a homemade hho torch, with some sodium hydroxide, and alum, I did that many years ago for fun, is easy to made and burns for 5 to 10 minutes.. I'm not sure if the heat would spread too much on the copper and melt my work anyway, maybe if I place on side on water and solder side per side.. I don't know..
Edited by frcent - 7/13/16 at 4:27am
post #2 of 4
Welcome to OCN.

You're not thinking ahead. Now you have made a part you cant add to because, as you say, the solder will melt.

Solder all the pieces that have to be soldered at once.

Also, your copper base is much to thin. It should be between 6mm and 8mm thick. That will give you much better heat transfer.

Here's some ideas:
Use a steel wire to hold the sides on when you solder.
You could put wood between the upright pieces of copper to hold then while you solder.
When it's soldered, turn it over and sand the surfaces in a piece of sand paper on a flat surface to get everything level.
Use a piece of plastic, thick enough to thread for barbs, as the top.
Plan out the barb placement and shapes of the upright pieces to get the best water flow through the water block. The upright pieces don't have to be flat and straight, they can be curved too.
Cut a rubber gasket to go between the copper block and plastic top.
You can thread holes in the copper for attaching the top.
Don't forget O rings under the bolts.

You may want to look around ProForums as there a quite a fer threads on making water blocks. It's an old forum but has a lot of good information.



Good Luck!
My System
(15 items)
 
  
CPUMotherboardGraphicsRAM
FX6300 Black M5A99X EVO R2.0 Nvidia GTS450 Team Vulcan PC3 12800 
Hard DriveOptical DriveCoolingOS
Samsung 840 PRO Asus DRW-1608P (x2) Custom Water Cooling Win7 (Ult), Win 8.1 & Win Server 2012 R2 
MonitorKeyboardPowerCase
2 X Samsung 915N Ducky Shine III, Blue Cherry/Blue LEDs PCP&C 1kw Lian Li PC-71 (W/Window) 
MouseAudio
Logiteck G400s none 
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My System
(15 items)
 
  
CPUMotherboardGraphicsRAM
FX6300 Black M5A99X EVO R2.0 Nvidia GTS450 Team Vulcan PC3 12800 
Hard DriveOptical DriveCoolingOS
Samsung 840 PRO Asus DRW-1608P (x2) Custom Water Cooling Win7 (Ult), Win 8.1 & Win Server 2012 R2 
MonitorKeyboardPowerCase
2 X Samsung 915N Ducky Shine III, Blue Cherry/Blue LEDs PCP&C 1kw Lian Li PC-71 (W/Window) 
MouseAudio
Logiteck G400s none 
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post #3 of 4
Thread Starter 
Thanks smile.gif

Yes, I have to make a new plan now ^^' But I did not know that the copper base was thin to this, I thought that too much copper between the CPU and the water could actually create excessive heat resistance ^^' But I don't have much experience on it anyway.. Could I solder another copper piece on this base to increase it? Look what I have here:



At left, this two pieces are the same sizes... This other on top right is a little more thick, 8mm I think, but is square, about the same area as a AMD IHS, just a little more big I think. Maybe I could solder this square piece where I soldered the copper fins on the original copper base, and move the copper fins in the top of this piece. It would help to be more like you said?



Or maybe solder this square piece on the bottom of the copper base, like this?



I have the two other pieces also, but not sure how to use them. Before I post here yesterday, I was just thinking in cut then to make the walls of the block, but now I'm not sure what to do. Maybe start for beginning again, and transfer the copper fins to one of this pieces and cut the thin copper base to make wall to the block? I don't know...

I also have a big copper heat sink, but this is really big. It is to me more a backup plan, because I don't know even how to seal this thing, and also no ideia how to make the water flow properly on it, because it has long fins for all the copper base, and the water probably will have to enter for multiple points, with more pressure also, a least I think. Here a photo from this heatsink:
Warning: Spoiler! (Click to show)



EDIT:

About what I said, use one of the other pieces as the base, would be something like this I think:


Warning: Spoiler! (Click to show)




Edited by frcent - 7/14/16 at 6:12am
post #4 of 4
I think this is the best idea, but there are problems doing it that way.



If you can find some pure silver solder (or solder that has a lot of silver in it) that would be excellent for soldering on a bigger base. Silver is a better conductor than even copper!

For attaching copper sides and/or a copper top there's a product that's sold in the USA called JB Weld. I've used it many times, even on automobile exhaust manifolds!



Of course you can continue on with the thinner base. Usually with these kinds of projects it isn't until you make the third one that you get it right. First one for practice and working out problems, second to try and improve performance, and finally the third incorporating what was learned form the first two and improving that.

You can Google Image Water Block and you'll see a lot of ideas for block and fin designs.

Good luck
My System
(15 items)
 
  
CPUMotherboardGraphicsRAM
FX6300 Black M5A99X EVO R2.0 Nvidia GTS450 Team Vulcan PC3 12800 
Hard DriveOptical DriveCoolingOS
Samsung 840 PRO Asus DRW-1608P (x2) Custom Water Cooling Win7 (Ult), Win 8.1 & Win Server 2012 R2 
MonitorKeyboardPowerCase
2 X Samsung 915N Ducky Shine III, Blue Cherry/Blue LEDs PCP&C 1kw Lian Li PC-71 (W/Window) 
MouseAudio
Logiteck G400s none 
  hide details  
Reply
My System
(15 items)
 
  
CPUMotherboardGraphicsRAM
FX6300 Black M5A99X EVO R2.0 Nvidia GTS450 Team Vulcan PC3 12800 
Hard DriveOptical DriveCoolingOS
Samsung 840 PRO Asus DRW-1608P (x2) Custom Water Cooling Win7 (Ult), Win 8.1 & Win Server 2012 R2 
MonitorKeyboardPowerCase
2 X Samsung 915N Ducky Shine III, Blue Cherry/Blue LEDs PCP&C 1kw Lian Li PC-71 (W/Window) 
MouseAudio
Logiteck G400s none 
  hide details  
Reply
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