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[Linux Mint 18 Sarah]: a couple of questions - Page 3

post #21 of 73
Quote:
Originally Posted by LostParticle View Post

Okay, glad it works for you, and yes, I as well dual boot between Windows 10 Pro, my main OS currently, and Linux Mint 18. Until a week ago I was using my second SSD for the Windows Insider program but I got bored of it, and anyway I've already gotten a good idea about how the Anniversary (of Win 10) will be, so I thought to give Mint a chance. With all the Telemetry Windows 10 is using I feel the need to start familiarizing myself with, and learning, Linux Mint. Until I will be capable to perform in Mint 90 - 95% of everything I'm doing in Windows.

So, were you not able to monitor frequencies in Mint, after all?

My research has led me to this thread. That person has found a way to monitor voltages on his ASUS Z97M-PLUS motherboard. I am sorry to admit this but I do not understand or fully understand, almost anything mentioned in that thread!... frown.gif Not a native English speaker, either...

Right now I'm posting this post from Windows but when, on Mint, I give the command

cat /etc/sensors3.conf

as suggested in that thread, it says that I should visit lm-sensors.org and find a configuration file for my motherboard! Well...that site is down each time I've tried to access it! And Goggling has not returned ANY result about a configuration file for my motherboard. Lost...don't know what to do frown.gif
Warning: Spoiler! (Click to show)




Pretty impressive that so few people in this gorgeous forum are dealing with Linux...

There's some applets that are available, I run one that shows realtime CPU frequency, temp, load, network speed etc but no voltage. Right click on applet bar and go add applets then select available online. There's a bunch of different ones on there not sure any do voltage, but gkrellm appears to show realtime core voltage on my system(mint 17.3) and doesn't take up much desktop and real easy to configure.

Here's the applet display



and gkrellm, this can be shrunk down considerably depending on selected sensors EDIT: it also remembers where it should be on the desktop


Edited by frack0 - 7/18/16 at 10:48pm
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post #22 of 73
On the note of the "lack of" Linux users, OCN used to have quite a large Linux community, unfortunately a few of the core members of the group were run off by certain other individuals.

On topic though:

For current core frequency monitoring - you'll need to use a specialized tool for any Intel Core series processors. This tool is `i7z` and uses mathematics to calculate the current core frequencies on the fly. This is how all of the modern Windows applications do it as well since the reported CPU frequency is always going to be based on the multiplier and bclk. In fact, on Linux with generations prior to (may be mistaken here) Ivy Bridge - the multiplier could only report the maximum NON-TURBO multiplier and so overclocked CPUs using a normally turbo only multiplier would always report their CPU frequency incorrectly. Here's an example using my system:
http://puu.sh/q6Evp/4b9785e4c1.png
As you can see the actual core frequency seems to "vary" quite a bit, even the reported numbers are all over the place. You can blame this one on Intel, they don't report the value like they used to. This CPU is overclocked to 4.4ghz, it reports 4009mhz, the BCLK+Multiplier calculates out to 4008mhz. The estimated frequency based on math comes out to ~4.35-4.45ghz.

For monitoring hardware, the lm-sensors suite is the best tool available. It can take some time for new platforms to hit the suite but usually everything is able to be probed using sensors-detect, especially if ACPI is enabled and working properly. Usually answering the default to the questions in sensors-detect is the best and safest approach. Probing for sensors that aren't there can cause kernel panics and data loss. YMMV. Google is your friend here, since if your board doesn't show up with the automatic selections, you may need to see what other people have done to get things working.
Once you have lm-sensors set up, you have literally dozens of options for actually monitoring the data. For one, you could use `watch` to run the `sensors` utility on a loop:
Code:
watch -ctn 10 sensors
The above would run "sensors" in a terminal every ten seconds.
You could also do as above and use some of the KDE Plasmoids, a desktop applet, or a dedicated utility like GKRELLM, as well as the defacto-standard for system monitoring on Linux: Conky. Conky is probably one of the most powerful desktop applications available for Linux and can do pretty much anything you could imagine for adding realtime monitoring on your desktop. Check it out:
Simple sidebar type conky configurations:
http://img06.deviantart.net/a791/i/2011/011/9/6/simple_conky_by_pemete-d36ydt3.png

Complex LUA-assisted conky configurations:
http://img15.deviantart.net/2f10/i/2011/057/8/a/conky___lua_ubuntu_by_fenouille84-d3af8o5.png
http://devmadness.com/wp-content/uploads/2015/04/black_pearl_conky_by_ninquitassar-d4nkub7.jpg
https://curiousandcrazy.files.wordpress.com/2015/09/screenshot-from-2015-09-08-232101.png

The limit is only your patience and imagination. There's literally hundreds of thousands of posts about conky configuration with examples and presets including extensions and all sorts of other things. You can pretty much tinker to your hearts content. I opt for something very minimal when I do use Conky but I haven't had time to fiddle with a real Linux desktop in quite some time, right now I just rock XFCE4 stock with minimal tweaks. Nothing really serious like my old setup:
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post #23 of 73
Thread Starter 
Thank you very much, @frack0 and @Xaero252 for your rich replies, +REP to both of you smile.gif

Your suggestions require quite some time, lots of reading and effort, as I observe. Unfortunately, this specific period I do not have so much time. For sure I will research this further though because I definitely want to make Linux Mint my primary OS or equal to my primary OS - currently Win 10 Pro. This means to be able to do almost everything I'm doing in Windows, in Mint. And indeed I am even right now, like 90% of it. smile.gif

Anyway, when it comes to monitoring i7z did the trick for me. Here's a screenshot from my system:
Warning: Spoiler! (Click to show)

It does not monitor the wealth of the values HWiNFO64 is capable of monitoring, in Windows, but it is good enough for now, in combination with Psensor for the temperatures.

One last question (even though I might revisit this thread for other inquiries on Linux Mint):

I have observed that my system is not idling as it idles in Windows. While i7z is monitoring and my system is idle, so I do not touch the mouse at all for approx. 10 minutes, I observe that my Core Ratio never settles down to x8 (so, at 800 MHz). It keeps fluctuating and rising up to 4700 MHz, which is my current OC (overclock). Why is this happening? Is this how it is supposed to happen in Mint? Because in Windows 10 Pro if I leave my system in peace, after 1 -2 minutes my cores lower down to 800 MHz and they stay there! At least this is what HWiNFO64 is showing me.

Note please that I have observed this behavior both with the recommended kernel, as well as with the latest one.

Thank you! thumb.gif


PS:
Quote:
Originally Posted by Xaero252 View Post


...

For monitoring hardware, the lm-sensors suite is the best tool available. It can take some time for new platforms to hit the suite but usually everything is able to be probed using sensors-detect, especially if ACPI is enabled and working properly.

...

Can you please tell me how can I check this out? I mean, how can I verify that it is enabled and working properly?
Edited by LostParticle - 7/19/16 at 10:05am
    
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post #24 of 73
Quote:
Originally Posted by LostParticle View Post

Can you please tell me how can I check this out? I mean, how can I verify that it is enabled and working properly?
Sure thing!
The Linux Kernel hardware autodetection _SHOULD_ automatically see that ACPI is available on your motherboard, and probe the necessary drivers to pull information from those ACPI sensors. To find out if it did it's job you can run "dmesg | grep -i acpi" This should output something like this:
Code:
[    0.000000] BIOS-e820: [mem 0x00000000bf780000-0x00000000bf797fff] ACPI data
[    0.000000] BIOS-e820: [mem 0x00000000bf798000-0x00000000bf7dbfff] ACPI NVS
[    0.000000] ACPI: Early table checksum verification disabled
[    0.000000] ACPI: RSDP 0x00000000000FB200 000024 (v02 ACPIAM)
[    0.000000] ACPI: XSDT 0x00000000BF780100 00005C (v01 051211 XSDT1500 20110512 MSFT 00000097)
[    0.000000] ACPI: FACP 0x00000000BF780290 0000F4 (v03 051211 FACP1500 20110512 MSFT 00000097)
[    0.000000] ACPI: DSDT 0x00000000BF7804B0 00D8B5 (v01 A1545  A1545000 00000000 INTL 20060113)
[    0.000000] ACPI: FACS 0x00000000BF798000 000040
[    0.000000] ACPI: FACS 0x00000000BF798000 000040
[    0.000000] ACPI: APIC 0x00000000BF780390 0000D8 (v01 051211 APIC1500 20110512 MSFT 00000097)
[    0.000000] ACPI: MCFG 0x00000000BF780470 00003C (v01 051211 OEMMCFG  20110512 MSFT 00000097)
[    0.000000] ACPI: OEMB 0x00000000BF798040 000072 (v01 051211 OEMB1500 20110512 MSFT 00000097)
[    0.000000] ACPI: HPET 0x00000000BF78F4B0 000038 (v01 051211 OEMHPET  20110512 MSFT 00000097)
[    0.000000] ACPI: DMAR 0x00000000BF7980C0 000140 (v01 AMI    OEMDMAR  00000001 MSFT 00000097)
[    0.000000] ACPI: OSFR 0x00000000BF78F4F0 0000B0 (v01 051211 OEMOSFR  20110512 MSFT 00000097)
[    0.000000] ACPI: Local APIC address 0xfee00000
[    0.000000] ACPI: PM-Timer IO Port: 0x808
[    0.000000] ACPI: Local APIC address 0xfee00000
[    0.000000] ACPI: INT_SRC_OVR (bus 0 bus_irq 0 global_irq 2 dfl dfl)
[    0.000000] ACPI: INT_SRC_OVR (bus 0 bus_irq 9 global_irq 9 high level)
[    0.000000] ACPI: IRQ0 used by override.
[    0.000000] ACPI: IRQ9 used by override.
[    0.000000] Using ACPI (MADT) for SMP configuration information
[    0.000000] ACPI: HPET id: 0x8086a301 base: 0xfed00000
[    0.000032] ACPI: Core revision 20160108
[    0.005511] ACPI: 1 ACPI AML tables successfully acquired and loaded
[    0.931388] PM: Registering ACPI NVS region [mem 0xbf798000-0xbf7dbfff] (278528 bytes)
[    0.939841] ACPI: bus type PCI registered
[    0.939842] acpiphp: ACPI Hot Plug PCI Controller Driver version: 0.5
[    0.944134] ACPI: Added _OSI(Module Device)
[    0.944135] ACPI: Added _OSI(Processor Device)
[    0.944136] ACPI: Added _OSI(3.0 _SCP Extensions)
[    0.944137] ACPI: Added _OSI(Processor Aggregator Device)
[    0.944355] ACPI: Executed 1 blocks of module-level executable AML code
[    1.007337] ACPI: Interpreter enabled
[    1.007352] ACPI: (supports S0 S1 S3 S4 S5)
[    1.007353] ACPI: Using IOAPIC for interrupt routing
[    1.007976] PCI: MMCONFIG at [mem 0xe0000000-0xefffffff] reserved in ACPI motherboard resources
[    1.008264] PCI: Using host bridge windows from ACPI; if necessary, use "pci=nocrs" and report a bug
[    1.011960] ACPI: PCI Root Bridge [PCI0] (domain 0000 [bus 00-ff])
[    1.011963] acpi PNP0A08:00: _OSC: OS supports [ExtendedConfig ASPM ClockPM Segments MSI]
You'll see that ACPI is first exposing the BIOS to the OS, and then adding various other hardware and sensors to the table of available hardware the kernel can see. Most of the above output is just debugging output showing that yes, indeed ACPI is working. It's not something you should have to mess with, and is expected to "just work" at this point in time. Any modern system should have ACPI available, enabled and working. The only case where it wouldn't is if for some reason the Kernel you are running was compiled without ACPI support.

Edit:
As far as your concerns with the CPU speed fluctuating during idle, depending on the current CPU Governor and the power save settings you have configured, this is more or less normal behavior. You are probably using the "ondemand" governor which is going to fork CPU resources over AS SOON as they are requested. You could try the "powersave" governor or any of the others, see here for more details:
https://wiki.archlinux.org/index.php/CPU_frequency_scaling

And here for further powersaving tips:
https://wiki.archlinux.org/index.php/Power_management
https://wiki.archlinux.org/index.php/laptop

You'll find that on Linux you actually have a lot more direct control over the CPU's frequency scaling, since you can even employ daemons to control the CPU frequency manually throughout a normal day, and respond to events like user interaction. For example you could schedule any time from 11pm to 4pm to run the CPU at 800mhz for energy savings, and then run the ondemand scheduler from 4pm to 11pm. And automatically switch to the ondemand scheduler if the computer has been used, and switch away from it after being idle for 30 minutes. It's quite robust, if a bit tedious to configure.

Another Edit:

As far as the wealth of values hwinfo64 monitors, I believe almost all of the information available in that tool is probably available in sysfs, by default. Obviously this isn't very useful to the end-user, but it is there. For example, cat /proc/cpuinfo will tell you more about your CPU than you can possibly care about. `lspci` `lsusb` `lshw` and `dmidecode` can tell you more about the PCI, USB and other hardware devices, and dmidecode can tell you everything about your ram. Unfortunately nobody has really wrapped all of these up into a truly usable tool for actively monitoring the information. Usually its a passive probe and print of the data. You may wish to look at "hardinfo" which provides a GUI to look at the current system. It doesn't do a lot in the way of monitoring, but it will show all of your hardware in a GUI very easily. Also take a look at OpenHardwareMonitor.
Edited by Xaero252 - 7/19/16 at 11:18am
    
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post #25 of 73
Thread Starter 
Okay, thanks a lot for your reply! I am a complete newbie so could you please have a look at my output and tell me if everything is all right with this ACPI?
lm-sensors and sensors show my VCore up to +2.04V ....
Warning: Spoiler! (Click to show)
me@me-desktop ~ $ dmesg | grep -i acpi
[ 0.000000] BIOS-e820: [mem 0x00000000ca96a000-0x00000000ca970fff] ACPI NVS
[ 0.000000] BIOS-e820: [mem 0x00000000de3b9000-0x00000000de4f4fff] ACPI NVS
[ 0.000000] ACPI: Early table checksum verification disabled
[ 0.000000] ACPI: RSDP 0x00000000000F04A0 000024 (v02 ALASKA)
[ 0.000000] ACPI: XSDT 0x00000000DE4C1080 000084 (v01 ALASKA A M I 01072009 AMI 00010013)
[ 0.000000] ACPI: FACP 0x00000000DE4D2770 00010C (v05 ALASKA A M I 01072009 AMI 00010013)
[ 0.000000] ACPI: DSDT 0x00000000DE4C11A0 0115C9 (v02 ALASKA A M I 00000171 INTL 20120711)
[ 0.000000] ACPI: FACS 0x00000000DE4F4F80 000040
[ 0.000000] ACPI: APIC 0x00000000DE4D2880 000092 (v03 ALASKA A M I 01072009 AMI 00010013)
[ 0.000000] ACPI: FPDT 0x00000000DE4D2918 000044 (v01 ALASKA A M I 01072009 AMI 00010013)
[ 0.000000] ACPI: SSDT 0x00000000DE4D2960 000539 (v01 PmRef Cpu0Ist 00003000 INTL 20051117)
[ 0.000000] ACPI: SSDT 0x00000000DE4D2EA0 000B74 (v01 CpuRef CpuSsdt 00003000 INTL 20051117)
[ 0.000000] ACPI: SSDT 0x00000000DE4D3A18 0001C7 (v01 PmRef LakeTiny 00003000 INTL 20051117)
[ 0.000000] ACPI: MCFG 0x00000000DE4D3BE0 00003C (v01 ALASKA A M I 01072009 MSFT 00000097)
[ 0.000000] ACPI: HPET 0x00000000DE4D3C20 000038 (v01 ALASKA A M I 01072009 AMI. 00000005)
[ 0.000000] ACPI: SSDT 0x00000000DE4D3C58 00036D (v01 SataRe SataTabl 00001000 INTL 20120711)
[ 0.000000] ACPI: SSDT 0x00000000DE4D3FC8 005A36 (v01 SaSsdt SaSsdt 00003000 INTL 20120711)
[ 0.000000] ACPI: AAFT 0x00000000DE4D9A00 0007B8 (v01 ALASKA OEMAAFT 01072009 MSFT 00000097)
[ 0.000000] ACPI: UEFI 0x00000000DE4DA1B8 000042 (v01 ALASKA A M I 01072009 00000000)
[ 0.000000] ACPI: Local APIC address 0xfee00000
[ 0.000000] ACPI: PM-Timer IO Port: 0x1808
[ 0.000000] ACPI: Local APIC address 0xfee00000
[ 0.000000] ACPI: LAPIC_NMI (acpi_id[0xff] high edge lint[0x1])
[ 0.000000] ACPI: INT_SRC_OVR (bus 0 bus_irq 0 global_irq 2 dfl dfl)
[ 0.000000] ACPI: INT_SRC_OVR (bus 0 bus_irq 9 global_irq 9 high level)
[ 0.000000] ACPI: IRQ0 used by override.
[ 0.000000] ACPI: IRQ9 used by override.
[ 0.000000] Using ACPI (MADT) for SMP configuration information
[ 0.000000] ACPI: HPET id: 0x8086a701 base: 0xfed00000
[ 0.000021] ACPI: Core revision 20150930
[ 0.009931] ACPI: 6 ACPI AML tables successfully acquired and loaded
[ 0.095402] PM: Registering ACPI NVS region [mem 0xca96a000-0xca970fff] (28672 bytes)
[ 0.095403] PM: Registering ACPI NVS region [mem 0xde3b9000-0xde4f4fff] (1294336 bytes)
[ 0.117007] ACPI FADT declares the system doesn't support PCIe ASPM, so disable it
[ 0.117007] ACPI: bus type PCI registered
[ 0.117008] acpiphp: ACPI Hot Plug PCI Controller Driver version: 0.5
[ 0.129172] ACPI: Added _OSI(Module Device)
[ 0.129173] ACPI: Added _OSI(Processor Device)
[ 0.129174] ACPI: Added _OSI(3.0 _SCP Extensions)
[ 0.129175] ACPI: Added _OSI(Processor Aggregator Device)
[ 0.132060] ACPI: Executed 15 blocks of module-level executable AML code
[ 0.134475] ACPI: Dynamic OEM Table Load:
[ 0.134479] ACPI: SSDT 0xFFFF88040BC11800 0003D3 (v01 PmRef Cpu0Cst 00003001 INTL 20051117)
[ 0.134904] ACPI: Dynamic OEM Table Load:
[ 0.134907] ACPI: SSDT 0xFFFF88040C089800 0005AA (v01 PmRef ApIst 00003000 INTL 20051117)
[ 0.135355] ACPI: Dynamic OEM Table Load:
[ 0.135357] ACPI: SSDT 0xFFFF88040BC09E00 000119 (v01 PmRef ApCst 00003000 INTL 20051117)
[ 0.136602] ACPI: Interpreter enabled
[ 0.136607] ACPI Exception: AE_NOT_FOUND, While evaluating Sleep State [\_S1_] (20150930/hwxface-580)
[ 0.136611] ACPI Exception: AE_NOT_FOUND, While evaluating Sleep State [\_S2_] (20150930/hwxface-580)
[ 0.136622] ACPI: (supports S0 S3 S4 S5)
[ 0.136623] ACPI: Using IOAPIC for interrupt routing
[ 0.136657] PCI: Using host bridge windows from ACPI; if necessary, use "pci=nocrs" and report a bug
[ 0.143312] ACPI: PCI Root Bridge [PCI0] (domain 0000 [bus 00-7e])
[ 0.143316] acpi PNP0A08:00: _OSC: OS supports [ExtendedConfig ASPM ClockPM Segments MSI]
[ 0.143441] acpi PNP0A08:00: _OSC: platform does not support [PCIeHotplug PME]
[ 0.143518] acpi PNP0A08:00: _OSC: OS now controls [AER PCIeCapability]
[ 0.143519] acpi PNP0A08:00: FADT indicates ASPM is unsupported, using BIOS configuration
[ 0.143871] pci 0000:00:01.0: System wakeup disabled by ACPI
[ 0.143999] pci 0000:00:14.0: System wakeup disabled by ACPI
[ 0.144254] pci 0000:00:1a.0: System wakeup disabled by ACPI
[ 0.144367] pci 0000:00:1c.0: System wakeup disabled by ACPI
[ 0.144479] pci 0000:00:1c.2: System wakeup disabled by ACPI
[ 0.144589] pci 0000:00:1c.3: System wakeup disabled by ACPI
[ 0.144726] pci 0000:00:1d.0: System wakeup disabled by ACPI
[ 0.145162] pci 0000:01:00.0: System wakeup disabled by ACPI
[ 0.153045] acpiphp: Slot [1] registered
[ 0.169715] pci 0000:08:00.0: System wakeup disabled by ACPI
[ 0.177463] ACPI: PCI Interrupt Link [LNKA] (IRQs 3 4 5 6 10 *11 12 14 15)
[ 0.177490] ACPI: PCI Interrupt Link [LNKB] (IRQs 3 4 5 6 *10 11 12 14 15)
[ 0.177516] ACPI: PCI Interrupt Link [LNKC] (IRQs *3 4 5 6 10 11 12 14 15)
[ 0.177542] ACPI: PCI Interrupt Link [LNKD] (IRQs 3 4 *5 6 10 11 12 14 15)
[ 0.177567] ACPI: PCI Interrupt Link [LNKE] (IRQs 3 4 5 6 10 11 12 14 15) *0, disabled.
[ 0.177593] ACPI: PCI Interrupt Link [LNKF] (IRQs 3 4 5 6 10 11 12 14 15) *0, disabled.
[ 0.177618] ACPI: PCI Interrupt Link [LNKG] (IRQs 3 4 5 6 10 11 12 14 15) *0, disabled.
[ 0.177644] ACPI: PCI Interrupt Link [LNKH] (IRQs 3 4 5 6 10 *11 12 14 15)
[ 0.177725] ACPI: Enabled 5 GPEs in block 00 to 3F
[ 0.177942] ACPI: bus type USB registered
[ 0.178032] PCI: Using ACPI for IRQ routing
[ 0.185715] pnp: PnP ACPI init
[ 0.185777] system 00:00: Plug and Play ACPI device, IDs PNP0c01 (active)
[ 0.185830] system 00:01: Plug and Play ACPI device, IDs PNP0c02 (active)
[ 0.185842] pnp 00:02: Plug and Play ACPI device, IDs PNP0b00 (active)
[ 0.185865] system 00:03: Plug and Play ACPI device, IDs INT3f0d PNP0c02 (active)
[ 0.185911] system 00:04: Plug and Play ACPI device, IDs PNP0c02 (active)
[ 0.185955] system 00:05: Plug and Play ACPI device, IDs PNP0c02 (active)
[ 0.185985] system 00:06: Plug and Play ACPI device, IDs PNP0c02 (active)
[ 0.186098] pnp 00:07: Plug and Play ACPI device, IDs PNP0501 (active)
[ 0.186379] system 00:08: Plug and Play ACPI device, IDs PNP0c02 (active)
[ 0.186483] pnp: PnP ACPI: found 9 devices
[ 0.191999] clocksource: acpi_pm: mask: 0xffffff max_cycles: 0xffffff, max_idle_ns: 2085701024 ns
[ 0.554116] ACPI: Power Button [PWRB]
[ 0.554136] ACPI: Sleep Button [SLPB]
[ 0.554155] ACPI: Power Button [PWRF]
me@me-desktop ~ $

Also, thanks for clarifying it to me about the Power Management! The truth is that in my Linux Mint when I give "Power Management" I get this: Warning: Spoiler! (Click to show)

Absolutely nothing there, like Balanced or Performance profile or Power Saver, etc...

You gave me links to ArchLinux.... Is it the same on Mint? Are these applicable?

Thanks man! thumb.gif
Edited by LostParticle - 7/19/16 at 11:24am
    
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post #26 of 73
Quote:
Originally Posted by LostParticle View Post

Okay, thanks a lot for your reply! I am a complete newbie so could you please have a look at my output and tell me if everything is all right with this ACPI?
lm-sensors and sensors show my VCore up to +2.04V ....

Also, thanks for clarifying it to me about the Power Management! The truth is that in my Linux Mint when I give "Power Management" I get this:


Absolutely nothing there, like Balanced or Performance profile or Power Saver, etc...

You gave me links to ArchLinux.... Is it the same on Mint? Are these applicable?

Thanks man! thumb.gif

On the first note about voltage; that sensor is being properly detected but may not be reading correct values, this is probably an upstream bug in LM_SENSORS. You actually got me curious and looking at my output I see some address conflicts for ACPI. A bit of research turns up that certain BIOS changes ASUS has made recently (last 3-5 years) internally is preventing exclusive access to ACPI. The workaround is to add acpi_enforce_resources=lax to your kernel command line. This workaround is kind of hacky and not proper, but it does get the job done.
To add this option edit (as root) /etc/default/grub. Change the line that reads GRUB_CMDLINE_LINUX_DEFAULT="quiet" to add acpi_enforce_resources=lax after quiet so it reads GRUB_CMDLINE_LINUX_DEFAULT="quiet acpi_enforce_resources=lax"
After saving the file run (again, as root) update-grub.
If things don't work right or you notice problems, you can boot into failsafe mode to remove that change, and things should return to normal.

On the note of Power Management - that power management application is a gui that provides minimal configuration. Most configuration on Linux is done via configuration files stored on the hard drive. This is a two-edged sword. It puts the power in the hands of the user, and if you make a mistake you'll pay the price. But because they are stored plaintext... as long as the drive isn't unreadable, you can always go back in and fix them.

And finally, in regards to the ArchWiki:
The ArchWiki is almost always applicable. It was written by ArchLinux users, for ArchLinux primarily, but almost all of its content translates very well to any Linux distribution that uses SystemD. The package names and the package management program will be different, but the information is the same. Especially when it comes to core Linux hardware capabilities, since those are the same on every distribution.


A small footnote before I go:
I started my Linux Journey in 2003 with a foray into Ubuntu, followed by some meddling in a strange land called XandrOS. When I began I knew nothing of the terminal, the kernel, graphics drivers, anything. I didn't understand Windows fully much less did I have a grasp of how to navigate a filesystem and configure things. After messing around for a couple of months I became frustrated and gave up. I went back to Windows and eventually came to grasp just about everything one could on Windows. In 2007 I made a proper switch to Linux. It took me probably a year to get to the point that I was comfortable editing files and getting things configured. I was determined and I conquered by desire. I wanted things to look a certain way and work a certain way and I got what I wanted. Don't let yourself get discouraged, it is quite daunting when you look at things from afar, and it seems like its a serious investment of time and resources... but I assure you it is worth the reward. And now it is easier than ever to learn Linux, the GUI provides you the tools to give you a nudge in the right direction, and resources like the Gentoo and ArchLinux wiki and the legacy of information held by the Canonical forums and github make almost any problem just a simple google search away.
    
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post #27 of 73
90℅ of your problems in Linux can be solved by Google, if not it is probably a more complicated fix or a uncommon bug.
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post #28 of 73
Linux will by default apply full power to any task at hand that presents itself for processing. That said, the processor will idle at 800 until something gets scheduled and then it will go to full power until it completes. That is the way the kernel is designed, all or nothing.
There still isn't a good voltage monitor. I use conky for monitoring everything else.
 
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post #29 of 73
Thread Starter 
Hi guys, thanks for all the replies-suggestions-advice!

It requires quite some time to learn/apply all these, so for now I am using just i7z to monitor my CPU activity, and this is good enough for me:

Warning: Spoiler! (Click to show)

Just one question, regarding what's shown above (in the screenshot):

- What do the numbers under the column C7% mean?

Open Hardware Monitor mentioned by @Xaero252 ealrier could be a nice idea - I am aware of this utility from Windows - but...I have uninstalled Mono after following the guide I mention in my first post.


@jdallara, pretty interesting what you say, IF this is Mint's (or Linux) way though, I have no problem with it.

Oh! One more thing! How can I set a custom Zoom Level in Thunderbird? When I am viewing my e-mails in my Inbox I always have to press Ctrl+ to zoom in, because the font is minuscule.

Thank you.
Edited by LostParticle - 7/20/16 at 9:57am
    
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post #30 of 73
Quote:
Originally Posted by LostParticle View Post

Hi guys, thanks for all the replies-suggestions-advice!

It requires quite some time to learn/apply all these, so for now I am using just i7z to monitor my CPU activity, and this is good enough for me:

Warning: Spoiler! (Click to show)

Just one question, regarding what's shown above (in the screenshot):

- What do the numbers under the column C7% mean?

Open Hardware Monitor mentioned by @Xaero252 ealrier could be a nice idea - I am aware of this utility from Windows - but...I have uninstalled Mono after following the guide I mention in my first post.


@jdallara, pretty interesting what you say, IF this is Mint's (or Linux) way though, I have no problem with it.

Oh! One more thing! How can I set a custom Zoom Level in Thunderbird? When I am viewing my e-mails in my Inbox I always have to press Ctrl+ to zoom in, because the font is minuscule.

Thank you.

Unfortunately I don't have a system running at this time, but you should be able to change the default font size in T-bird in the settings menu. If I recall is it set by default for a low res monitor. The number listed under C7% is the amount of time the processor is sitting in its lowest power state.
 
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