Overclock.net › Forums › Components › Mice › Why are DIY mice so rare?
New Posts  All Forums:Forum Nav:

Why are DIY mice so rare? - Page 5

post #41 of 61
Analog ways have too big of tolerances usually. Even if possible i believe it's really hard to make everything so accurate that it has no wobble/play/travel. I think clay and the likes are useful for prototyping though.
post #42 of 61
Quote:
Originally Posted by M1st View Post

Analog ways have too big of tolerances usually. Even if possible i believe it's really hard to make everything so accurate that it has no wobble/play/travel. I think clay and the likes are useful for prototyping though.

Not so big as you think smile.gif with care and without making all of those things on hurry mode, it can be done accurate smile.gif
post #43 of 61
Thread Starter 
Thanks for the comments. I am slowly getting the picture why DIY keyboards are much more common.
Quote:
Originally Posted by M1st View Post

Warning: Spoiler! (Click to show)
I'm the person who attempted to DIY completely custom mouse shell for g303 internals via 3d printing and abandoned the idea.

Problem with 3d printing mouse shell is materials. Some of them are just bad for these purposes, and those that are good are way too expensive. Also building a decent mouse shell requires alot of test trials which are taking very much time, cuz the process is: 1) CAD the model, 2) send it to printing company, 3) wait, 4) receive the model, 5) repeat. Not to say that they take alot of money.
I checked your project. Pretty nice!
Quote:
Originally Posted by wareya View Post

Warning: Spoiler! (Click to show)
Shell is the biggest thing keeping me from custom-making a mouse

Shells have to secure the sensor and switches at a minimum so you generally have to mutilate an existing mouse
I suppose you have not found a decent shape then or do you think the shell is a more important matter to DIY than the electronics?
Quote:
Originally Posted by Furiosus View Post

Warning: Spoiler! (Click to show)
I've got a DIY Sensei 3366 following qsxcv's guidance and code. Gaming friend who studies electronic engineering also just built one using this, will try and get him to post it up!
Nice job! Please do smile.gif Did he go further and make a printed circuit board or does he also use the Teensy(?) board?
Quote:
Originally Posted by wareya View Post

Warning: Spoiler! (Click to show)
"99% of the comments were against the idea, because it meant it'd be harder to replace the keycaps

people literally break stock stems trying to take crappy OEM keycaps off, making it harder to take off keycaps is a serious problem

side note: keyboard firmware is generally garbage, just like mice, except the situation is significantly worse because people don't notice keyboard key latency and literally act like it doesn't matter. building your own keyboard lets you stick a teensy in it and do whatever you want thumb.gif

Believe it or not, there is a lot to gain with a custom mouse. Most mouse firmware is garbage. The only reason they're not common is because it's very hard to make a custom mouse of acceptable physical quality. That's why most custom mouse projects are really just mods of existing mice with some of the parts being substituted.
You mention the firmware being garbage but also mention about physical quality. Do you mean the shell quality or the physical quality of the electronics? I mean, you could just design a printed circuit board for a shell you like or are the measures too hard to get correct?
Quote:
Originally Posted by genericcc View Post

Warning: Spoiler! (Click to show)
I like how we went from people begging for years for an optical sensei to people complaining about the abudance of sensei clones in only 6 months.
I did not understand. Can you elaborate? I have seen people asking for a renewed version of the Sensei but how does it relate to DIYing?
post #44 of 61
Made an Aurora Adder in the spirit of this thread last night haha

http://www.overclock.net/t/1606337/so-i-made-an-aurora-adder
Edited by QLsya - 7/19/16 at 8:33am
post #45 of 61
Quote:
Originally Posted by M1st View Post

Analog ways have too big of tolerances usually. Even if possible i believe it's really hard to make everything so accurate that it has no wobble/play/travel. I think clay and the likes are useful for prototyping though.
A DIY mouse is by definition prototyping. It's also easier to manufacture to fit than to manufacture to tolerance, at least in very small production volumes(it's much easier to make part B match part A than to make both part A and B match independent reference C).

Shim stock and sandpaper go a long way.
1
(13 items)
 
  
CPUMotherboardGraphicsRAM
i7 930 @ 3.6 Gigabyte x58a ud3r Gigabyte GV-R6870C-1GD Mushkin Redline 
Hard DriveOptical DriveMonitorKeyboard
2x 1TB Spinpoint samsung dvd burner Samsung p2370 + Mitsubishi Diamond Pro 930SB WASD keyboards v1 semi custom w/ cherry browns 
PowerCaseMouse
Antec CP-850 Antec P183 CM Storm Spawn 
  hide details  
Reply
1
(13 items)
 
  
CPUMotherboardGraphicsRAM
i7 930 @ 3.6 Gigabyte x58a ud3r Gigabyte GV-R6870C-1GD Mushkin Redline 
Hard DriveOptical DriveMonitorKeyboard
2x 1TB Spinpoint samsung dvd burner Samsung p2370 + Mitsubishi Diamond Pro 930SB WASD keyboards v1 semi custom w/ cherry browns 
PowerCaseMouse
Antec CP-850 Antec P183 CM Storm Spawn 
  hide details  
Reply
post #46 of 61
Quote:
Originally Posted by mr one View Post

Not so big as you think smile.gif with care and without making all of those things on hurry mode, it can be done accurate smile.gif

Can you carve manually with tolerances less than +-0.1mm?
Quote:
Originally Posted by TranquilTempest View Post

A DIY mouse is by definition prototyping. It's also easier to manufacture to fit than to manufacture to tolerance, at least in very small production volumes(it's much easier to make part B match part A than to make both part A and B match independent reference C).

Shim stock and sandpaper go a long way.

We're talking theory anyway. Only way to actually judge whether it's possible or not in this exact field is testing.
post #47 of 61
Diy mouse? Try the Asus ROG sica.
post #48 of 61
Quote:
Originally Posted by M1st View Post

Can you carve manually with tolerances less than +-0.1mm?
Which part of a mouse needs tolerances that tight? The sensor height isn't that sensitive, and pin plunger microswitches have a throw about 5x that.

Also, if you knew anything about high precision, you'd know that humans can hold MUCH better tolerances than that. Many high end machine and measurement tools use hand scraped ways and surfaces, and in the context of making a plastic shell fit the switch placement, you could get that tolerance in a few minutes with some sandpaper or needle files.

Anyway, sculpting a mouse isn't about matching a tolerance, it's about matching your hand.
1
(13 items)
 
  
CPUMotherboardGraphicsRAM
i7 930 @ 3.6 Gigabyte x58a ud3r Gigabyte GV-R6870C-1GD Mushkin Redline 
Hard DriveOptical DriveMonitorKeyboard
2x 1TB Spinpoint samsung dvd burner Samsung p2370 + Mitsubishi Diamond Pro 930SB WASD keyboards v1 semi custom w/ cherry browns 
PowerCaseMouse
Antec CP-850 Antec P183 CM Storm Spawn 
  hide details  
Reply
1
(13 items)
 
  
CPUMotherboardGraphicsRAM
i7 930 @ 3.6 Gigabyte x58a ud3r Gigabyte GV-R6870C-1GD Mushkin Redline 
Hard DriveOptical DriveMonitorKeyboard
2x 1TB Spinpoint samsung dvd burner Samsung p2370 + Mitsubishi Diamond Pro 930SB WASD keyboards v1 semi custom w/ cherry browns 
PowerCaseMouse
Antec CP-850 Antec P183 CM Storm Spawn 
  hide details  
Reply
post #49 of 61
Quote:
Originally Posted by TranquilTempest View Post

Which part of a mouse needs tolerances that tight? The sensor height isn't that sensitive, and pin plunger microswitches have a throw about 5x that.

Also, if you knew anything about high precision, you'd know that humans can hold MUCH better tolerances than that. Many high end machine and measurement tools use hand scraped ways and surfaces, and in the context of making a plastic shell fit the switch placement, you could get that tolerance in a few minutes with some sandpaper or needle files.

Anyway, sculpting a mouse isn't about matching a tolerance, it's about matching your hand.

Sculpting a mouse is both, in fact. Sculpting outer surface is matching the hand, sculpting inner surface is about tolerances. That's why mouse companies who make their own shapes make prototypes out of foam/wood/whatever else. Then they digitize them and make inner structure in CAD. Try to open any modern Logi mouse for example. I really doubt you can do that by hand.

Also, if you overdo things with sandpaper, you can't revert that obviously. To me it looks far more reasonable to do that in CAD.

P. S. tolerances stack. You can get +-0.45 button travel from 0.15 tolerance on bot shell, top shell, and stem of top button.

P. P. S. i'm only interested in your opinion if you did that stuff yourself, i dont need ur theories.
post #50 of 61
http://www.alestrukov.com/works/wooden_mice
A guy who went from DIY to business with wooden mice. He explains alot of stuff there.
New Posts  All Forums:Forum Nav:
  Return Home
  Back to Forum: Mice
Overclock.net › Forums › Components › Mice › Why are DIY mice so rare?