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Moving to Nvidia - confused on what Gsync adds to 144Hz

post #1 of 12
Thread Starter 
Hi,

I'm looking to buy a new 27" monitor to replace my aging Samsung Syncmaster (1920x1080). It's a good monitor, but obviously nothing special. I am saving up for an Nvidia 1060 (when available) and I am confused as to what Gsync actually adds above and beyond a 144Hz refresh rate. I guess what I'm confused on it this, since the G-sync monitors seem to add anywhere between $75-$100 to the price of the monitor, what am I getting in return for that premium? I'm guessing Gsync would just ensure that if I hit FPS > 144/sec then it would eliminate frame tearing at those higher rates, but honestly, I'm not sure I'd really notice the difference than if I just locked the rate at 144. There seems to be a point of diminishing returns to me with regards to visual perception of frame rates (maybe I'm wrong on this).

Sorry if this post sounds dumb, I've not purchased a new monitor in over five years and haven't owned an Nvidia card in that much time either, so I want to make the best decision possible. Right now, it just seems like a monitor with a low response time and a 144Hz refresh rate is all I would really need.

But I'm open to input, any suggestions?

Monitor budget: $300 - $350 US for the monitor - 27" (1080p is fine, I'm not that concerned about 4K, etc.).
Edited by TinyRichard - 7/17/16 at 7:08am
post #2 of 12
Tearing exists at any framerate, not just above 144. G-sync eliminates tearing at any framerate, and also makes motion look slightly more fluid at framerates below refresh rate.
    
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post #3 of 12
Thread Starter 
Quote:
Originally Posted by ToTheSun! View Post

Tearing exists at any framerate, not just above 144. G-sync eliminates tearing at any framerate, and also makes motion look slightly more fluid at framerates below refresh rate.

Oh, well, shoot I didn't realize that. Okay... that is helpful, I'm learning new information, thank you.
post #4 of 12
G-sync eliminates tearing without adding lag or stutter. It's a huge improvement for games that run at low or medium fps. Above 100 fps the difference with/without g-sync is less obvious as many people can't see tearing at high fps (even though it's definitely still there).
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post #5 of 12
Quote:
Originally Posted by TinyRichard View Post

Quote:
Originally Posted by ToTheSun! View Post

Tearing exists at any framerate, not just above 144. G-sync eliminates tearing at any framerate, and also makes motion look slightly more fluid at framerates below refresh rate.

Oh, well, shoot I didn't realize that. Okay... that is helpful, I'm learning new information, thank you.
To elaborate, if you plan on playing games at settings that might net you framerates that may dip below max refresh rate, i believe g-sync (or freesync, for that matter) is a good investment, as it will make the experience better.

If you're ABSOLUTELY certain you won't play games below 144 FPS and you're on a budget, you can probably save yourself some money. Though, truthfully, don't we all play some graphics intensive games every now and then?
    
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post #6 of 12
Thread Starter 
Okay, I get what everyone is saying now. Looks like I need to save another benjamin (or two) and grab a Gsync enabled monitor. Thanks!
post #7 of 12
As others have said, gsync is mainly beneficial when your fps is lower than 144 or whatever the max refresh may be. The difference is less noticeable the higher you get, but it is still a nice experience - when I was testing one, I definitely felt like it was a little less jarring if my fps was fluctuating around, say, 100-130. You can most definitely still feel a huge difference if you fps goes from, say, 100 to 60 - gsync isn't magic or anything. Something to note about vsync/gsync interaction and input lag: If your framerates hit 144+, vsync takes over and you will suffer the normal vsync input lag (you can disable vsync, but then you'll obviously just get tearing when when above 144fps). However, you can combat this by using something like rivatuner to cap your fps at 140 or so (input lag tests show you need to cap it at 135-140, if you go higher, you can still suffer some lag). This is the same trick people do when just using vsync and capping your fps 1 or 2 below your refresh rate, except with gsync you don't have to deal with the slight microstutter you could sometimes notice since gsync will be syncing your refresh rate directly to your fps. Is it worth the 100-150 premium? Imo, probably not - at least if you're typically playing at 100+ fps. To me, this should just be considered a regular feature. I'm pretty sure all the earlier reviews of gsync where people were going nuts over how smooth it looks was mainly due to those people not experiencing a high refresh monitor before or something - to those that have been gaming at a high refresh rate/fps for years, gsync is just like "oh... that's neat and a nice replacement to vsync". Nvidia not supporting regular adaptive sync monitors so they could make more money with gsync definitely leaves a bad taste in my mouth, but I'm really not a fan of AMD's products, so I suppose I have to live with this "Nvidia tax".

tldr: Nice feature, but not game breaking if you consistently game at 100+ fps/hz already. Probably not worth the premium, but if you use Nvidia, you have no choice. If you use gsync, cap your fps at 135-140 (assuming 144hz) to eliminate input lag (if vsync enabled) or tearing (if vsync disabled).
Edited by Ickz - 7/17/16 at 9:23am
post #8 of 12
Had a friend ask a similar question recently, without actually looking at the technology is hard to explain, basically it's really useful when you fps fall lower than 144, if you plan to upgrade your GPU every few year using high-end ones than gsync is not needed, if you plan to "buy and forget" than gsync will ensure you will get fluid enough game experience in the future.

Gsync yes if

-lower than 144hz
-no more gpu upgrades for a while
-no more monitor upgrades for a while
-planning to upgrade to DP 1.4 (4k/144hz) or triple monitor setup, etc

gsync no if

-adm card (duh?)
-144hz stable
-high end GPU upgrades
post #9 of 12
Thread Starter 
Thank you all for the comments, it is useful in making sense of the terminology, which will eventually help me make a better product choice when I finally select a monitor. I probably won't buy another monitor for 5+ years, so it sounds like it just makes more sense to pay a little more now, get a Gsync enabled monitor and ensure a better experience over the long term.
post #10 of 12
Quote:
Originally Posted by TinyRichard View Post

Thank you all for the comments, it is useful in making sense of the terminology, which will eventually help me make a better product choice when I finally select a monitor. I probably won't buy another monitor for 5+ years, so it sounds like it just makes more sense to pay a little more now, get a Gsync enabled monitor and ensure a better experience over the long term.

Something that I feel has been left out in this thread is ULMB. Basically Ultra Low Motion Blur which you'll find on monitors that also support G-Sync is designed to minimise motion-blur and effectively make an image look cleaner. The drawback of ULMB and G-Sync is that neither can be used simultaneously; essentially you have to choose. From what I've read it seems that people with 144Hz monitors seem to prefer ULMB if you can sustain higher and constant framerates (100+), not just your monitor's refresh rate, which makes sense. G-Sync has minimal advantages if you have a high stable framerate and it seems that ULMB is the go to option. However, if your framerate is all over the joint then you'll likely experience severe tearing and should opt for G-Sync. That being said it comes down to the individual - if you play heaps of FPSs and hate tearing with a burning passion or if you find that ULMB doesnt make a difference then stick with G-Sync, it's entirely in the eye of the beholder.

Just seemed like something worth mentioning if you're going for a 144Hz G-Sync monitor.
Edited by MercurySteam - 7/19/16 at 1:04am
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