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Coax over Ethernet?

post #1 of 4
Thread Starter 
Hey guys, moved into a brand new apartment and they did something stupid....

Instead of installing coax throughout the building, they installed fiber lines + cat 5e internally. The problem? There are no local retail fiber providers. There is a local cable company now doing tv/internet installs but I don't want wires inside my new place running to my router, multiple tvs, etc. Above my front door is my cable termination point and my ethernet termination point (every room has an ethernet port).

Now, would it be possible to convert coax signal --> over ethernet --> convert it back to coax at the end? For example, using something like these cables?

https://www.amazon.com/Extender-Converter-Adapter-sender-receiver/dp/B00LNLETMA


If not these cables, then what is the best method? The cable company will provide me with a cable modem and 2 x set top boxes for my TVs.
    
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post #2 of 4
There seems to be several solutions to this, which seem to be available, and you can send various audio and video signals over cat5. In the first instance, you'll need something like this - http://www.netshop.co.uk/product/530/ptp-rf01

This should allow you to get your cable signal over Cat5. If you look for RF over Cat5 and HDMI or video over Cat5 you'll find solutions.

So, in short, Yes you can. Wisdom seem to be using "Baluns" to do this.
post #3 of 4
Thread Starter 
Thanks for the reply!

Now, I am glad to learn I can send the signal over cat5e, but do you think it will cause problems when I through in the cable companies set top boxes into the mix for TV? Will they be able to read the signal after its been converted from coax to cat5e and back?
    
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post #4 of 4
I'm sure they will, as long as the baluns are rated to work at the frequency of the set top boxes. It may struggle a little, looking at the frequency bands, they go up to about 1Ghz, but if i remember right, CAT5 is only rated up to about 500Mhz. Might be worth looking up. It should be better than this on a short run though, so you may get away with it.

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/North_American_television_frequencies

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Category_5_cable

Actually, it's worse than i thought. Cat5 is only rated to 100Mhz, so you may have problems. Only way to see though, will be to try it. Sorry.

Edit : It's CAT6 that can do 500Mhz

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Category_6_cable
Edited by latelesley - 7/25/16 at 10:13am
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