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All around high temps after switching to bigger case

post #1 of 9
Thread Starter 
I just transferred everything to a new case (750d), but I'm getting rather high idle temperatures.
Not really sure why. I have 2 intake on the front, 1 intake on bottom, 1 rear exhaust, and 3 top exhaust (2 for the PC radiator).

Temperatures
Motherboard 50 °C (122 °F)
CPU 51 °C (124 °F)
CPU Package 50 °C (122 °F)
CPU IA Cores 50 °C (122 °F)
CPU GT Cores 42 °C (108 °F)
CPU #1 / Core #1 50 °C (122 °F)
CPU #1 / Core #2 49 °C (120 °F)
CPU #1 / Core #3 46 °C (115 °F)
CPU #1 / Core #4 43 °C (109 °F)
GPU1: GPU Diode 57 °C (135 °F)
GPU2: GPU Diode 64 °C (147 °F)

The hard

Nothing has been overclocked
My top GPU reaches 82c when gaming, while the bottom goes to around 60c. Not really sure what to do, since the fan directions and everything else looks fine.

I am using a Coolmaster Seidon for my CPU.

Here are my specs

Operating System
Windows 10 Home N 64-bit
CPU
Intel Core i7 4790K @ 4.00GHz 48 °C
Haswell 22nm Technology
RAM
16.0GB Dual-Channel DDR3 @ 799MHz (10-10-10-27)
Motherboard
MSI Z97S SLI Krait Edition (MS-7922) (SOCKET 0) 50 °C
Graphics
XB271HU (2560x1440@144Hz)
Acer GD235HZ (1080x1920@60Hz)
DELL U3011 (2560x1600@60Hz)
2047MB NVIDIA GeForce GTX 980 Ti (Gigabyte) 57 °C
2047MB NVIDIA GeForce GTX 980 Ti (EVGA) 64 °C
ForceWare version: 368.81
SLI Enabled
Storage
465GB Samsung SSD 850 EVO 500GB (SSD) 33 °C
931GB Western Digital WDC WD1002FAEX-00Z3A0 (SATA) 38 °C
238GB OCZ-VERTEX4 (SSD)
2794GB Seagate ST3000DM001-9YN166 (SATA) 37 °C
Optical Drives
ASUS DRW-24B1ST i
Audio
Realtek High Definition Audio
post #2 of 9
I hate to be the bearer of bad news.....but the 750D has notoriously bad airflow. That is the root of your issue. They make a replacement front panel for it that helps a bit but doesn't completely solve it - http://www.corsair.com/en-us/obsidian-series-750d-high-airflow-intake-kit

If you are still in the return window, you might want to consider that route. You can head over to the Phanteks thread and look at the comments from many who switched from Corsair (a lot of 750D) and are far happier with the airflow, flexibility, looks and build quality - http://www.overclock.net/t/1418637/official-case-phanteks-case-club-for-lovers-owners
post #3 of 9
What cairlatano said. thumb.gif
post #4 of 9
Quote:
Originally Posted by ciarlatano View Post

I hate to be the bearer of bad news.....but the 750D has notoriously bad airflow. That is the root of your issue. They make a replacement front panel for it that helps a bit but doesn't completely solve it - http://www.corsair.com/en-us/obsidian-series-750d-high-airflow-intake-kit

design a bad product, then sell people the fix to bad design.. excellent marketing strat biggrin.gif sounds like alot of games that's been releasing lately biggrin.gif
post #5 of 9
Isn't the 750d meant to be a silent case instead of being a cooling king?
post #6 of 9
Quote:
Originally Posted by poinguan View Post

Isn't the 750d meant to be a silent case instead of being a cooling king?
Not really. Selling is what drives the market and few people have even an inkling of how airflow really works.
Honestly, few cases are meant to do anything but sell. Anything to do with good airflow, cooling and quiet is more by accident than planning. While that statement might seem radical it is more true than false. Case designers are mostly 'designers' not airflow and sound engineers. The 'design' cases that look nice and then the marketing department writes hyped up statements that average buyer sees as appealing.

For example the best possible airflow for a normally orientated motherboard case is front to back.
  • A front intake fan directly in front of CPU. Name a few cases with this airflow design. There are a few, but very few.
  • A back panel that has as much exhaust vent area as front panel has intake vent area. Again, there are a few but very few.
  • A back panel with lots of vent area in alignment with GPU / PCIe sockets. Again, a few but very few.
  • Venting that has similar airflow area to the fans that can be mounted on them. The best perforated metal I know of are 5mm or 6mm hex grill and they block 19-19.8% of their area. Front grills are 'decorative' blocking 50+% of their area.
post #7 of 9
Quote:
Originally Posted by poinguan View Post

Isn't the 750d meant to be a silent case instead of being a cooling king?

No, the 750D is meant to be as profitable as possible for Corsair.

Quote:
Originally Posted by psyclum View Post

design a bad product, then sell people the fix to bad design.. excellent marketing strat biggrin.gif sounds like alot of games that's been releasing lately biggrin.gif

Definitely not their regular marketing strategy. Typically they don't bother with a (in this case really half hearted) fix.

Quote:
Originally Posted by doyll View Post

Not really. Selling is what drives the market and few people have even an inkling of how airflow really works.
Honestly, few cases are meant to do anything but sell. Anything to do with good airflow, cooling and quiet is more by accident than planning. While that statement might seem radical it is more true than false. Case designers are mostly 'designers' not airflow and sound engineers. The 'design' cases that look nice and then the marketing department writes hyped up statements that average buyer sees as appealing.

There are still a couple of case mfg around that aren't completely unscrupulous, and actually make cases designed around function at reasonable prices. But, that is far from the norm.
Edited by ciarlatano - 7/31/16 at 8:43am
post #8 of 9
Before you go off and invest in a new case because "everything we buy is all marketing hype", I would suggest asking in the 750D owners club to see what others have done. It is known it's not the best airflow case but there probably some things you can do to help it instead of just throwing up your hands in advertising disgust and streaking through the ballpark to protest words on retail boxes.
 
Spare Parts
(8 items)
 
 
CPUMotherboardGraphicsRAM
intel i5 750 Lynnfield Gigabyte GA-P55-USB3 ASUS Strix GTX 960 G.SKILL Ripjaws X Series 16GB (2 x 8GB) 240-Pin... 
Hard DriveCoolingCoolingCooling
Crucial BX100 SSD 500GB EKWB EK-KIT L120 Corsair SP120 Koolance 2x140mm Radiator HX-CU1402V 
CoolingCoolingOSMonitor
Corsair AF140 Bitspower VG-NGTX960 Windows 7 Ultimate 64 bit Samsung Curved 27" S27D590C 
KeyboardPowerCaseMouse
Corsair Strafe RGB Apevia Iceburg 680 watts Apevia X-Sniper 2 EVGA Torq X3 Laser 
CPUMotherboardGraphicsRAM
AMD Phenom 9750 ASUS M3A78-CM PNY XLR8 GTX 460 Corsair XMS2 (4 x 1GB) 
Hard DriveCoolingCoolingPower
Hitachi 5K500 Silenx 92mm EFFIZIO Corsair SP 120 Red LED Antec 500watt 
CPUMotherboardGraphicsRAM
Intel Core i5-6400 Skylake ASRock A170A-X1/3.1 Gigabye G1 Gaming GTX 970 Windforce CORSAIR Vengeance LPX 16GB (4 x 4GB) 288-Pin DD... 
CoolingCoolingCoolingCooling
Bykski CPU-XPR-A High Performance Acrylic Nicke... EKWB Acrylic Nickel GPU Block Monsoon MMRS Reservoir Bykski BY-PUMP-XPH-PA Water Cooling Pump 
CoolingCoolingCoolingCooling
Koolance 240 30 FPI Radiator Magicool 280 14 FPI Radiator Bitfenix Spectre PWM 120mm Fan ML140 140mm PWM Premium Magnetic Levitation Fan 
OSPowerCase
Windows 10 Pro Corsair RM Series 850 Thermaltake Suppressor F31 
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Spare Parts
(8 items)
 
 
CPUMotherboardGraphicsRAM
intel i5 750 Lynnfield Gigabyte GA-P55-USB3 ASUS Strix GTX 960 G.SKILL Ripjaws X Series 16GB (2 x 8GB) 240-Pin... 
Hard DriveCoolingCoolingCooling
Crucial BX100 SSD 500GB EKWB EK-KIT L120 Corsair SP120 Koolance 2x140mm Radiator HX-CU1402V 
CoolingCoolingOSMonitor
Corsair AF140 Bitspower VG-NGTX960 Windows 7 Ultimate 64 bit Samsung Curved 27" S27D590C 
KeyboardPowerCaseMouse
Corsair Strafe RGB Apevia Iceburg 680 watts Apevia X-Sniper 2 EVGA Torq X3 Laser 
CPUMotherboardGraphicsRAM
AMD Phenom 9750 ASUS M3A78-CM PNY XLR8 GTX 460 Corsair XMS2 (4 x 1GB) 
Hard DriveCoolingCoolingPower
Hitachi 5K500 Silenx 92mm EFFIZIO Corsair SP 120 Red LED Antec 500watt 
CPUMotherboardGraphicsRAM
Intel Core i5-6400 Skylake ASRock A170A-X1/3.1 Gigabye G1 Gaming GTX 970 Windforce CORSAIR Vengeance LPX 16GB (4 x 4GB) 288-Pin DD... 
CoolingCoolingCoolingCooling
Bykski CPU-XPR-A High Performance Acrylic Nicke... EKWB Acrylic Nickel GPU Block Monsoon MMRS Reservoir Bykski BY-PUMP-XPH-PA Water Cooling Pump 
CoolingCoolingCoolingCooling
Koolance 240 30 FPI Radiator Magicool 280 14 FPI Radiator Bitfenix Spectre PWM 120mm Fan ML140 140mm PWM Premium Magnetic Levitation Fan 
OSPowerCase
Windows 10 Pro Corsair RM Series 850 Thermaltake Suppressor F31 
  hide details  
Reply
post #9 of 9
Quote:
Originally Posted by ciarlatano View Post


There are still a couple of case mfg around that aren't completely unscrupulous, and actually make cases designed around function at reasonable prices. But, that is far from the norm.
I have my favorites, basically the same ones you like. thumb.gif

But to design a really good flowing case would be designing a case that does not conform with what 'normal' cases look like. One of the best flowing cases is the old Apple Mac Pro.

Now that optical drives are becoming obsolete we are seeing a few full with full front venting.

What Radnad said. thumb.gif

I went off on a tangent about how poorly the airflow is in most case designs. You might find the "Ways to Better Cooling" link in my sig of interest. 1st post is index, click on topics to see them.5th is a good starting point.

You can get your case to flow and cool your system fine. It will take some work and likely a little experimenting to get good performance, but it will work.
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